Bourbon County Nov. 2019 Election Candidates: Advance Voting Starts Oct. 23

The vote here sign sits in front of the north wing of the Bourbon County Courthouse, 210 S. National.

Bourbon County Clerk Kendell Mason said advance voting will begin  at the courthouse, 210 S. National. Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. beginning October 23rd.  Advance voting ends on November 4th at noon.

CANDIDATES FOR THE 2019 BOURBON COUNTY GENERAL ELECTION

CITY OF BRONSON-CITY COUNCIL

JAMES E. OLSON-1218 CLAY ST, BRONSON, KS 66716

DANIELLE MINOR-506 BAY ST, BRONSON, KS 66716

MICHAEL STEWART-1111 CHARLES ST, BRONSON, KS 66716

CITY OF FORT SCOTT-CITY COMMISSION

HAROLD (PETE) ALLEN-1248 CRAWFORD, FORT SCOTT, KS 66701

KEVIN “SKITCH” ALLEN-324 E. 20TH ST, FORT SCOTT, KS 66701

CYNTHIA BARTELSMEYER-22 ½ N. MAIN ST PO BOX 266, FORT SCOTT, KS 66701

JOSH JONES-617 FAIRWAY, FORT SCOTT, KS 66701

DEB MCCOY-510 S. EDDY, FORT SCOTT, KS 66701

LINDSEY WATTS-1310 HORTON, FORT SCOTT, KS 66701

CITY OF FULTON

NO CANDIDATES FILED

CITY OF MAPLETON

NO CANDIDATES FILED

CITY OF REDFIELD-CITY COUNCIL

WILMA K. GRAHAM-102 W. 4TH ST, REDFIELD, KS 66769

JIMMIE JACKSON-502 W 1ST ST, REDFIELD, KS 66769

L.D. MORRISON-404 3RD, REDFIELD, KS 66769

ANGELA HIXON-311 N PINE ST, REDFIELD, KS 66769

CITY OF UNIONTOWN-CITY COUNCIL

DANEA D. ESSLINGER-205 7TH ST, UNIONTOWN, KS 66779

DAVE WEHRY-206 FULTON, UNIONTOWN, KS 66779

USD 234

JAMES WOOD-523 S HOLBROOK, FORT SCOTT, KS 66701  POSITION 1

DANNY BROWN-424 N FRANKLIN, FORT SCOTT, KS 66701  POSITION 2

MICHELLE HUDIBURG-904 S CRAWFORD, FORT SCOTT, KS 66701 POSITION 2

KELLYE BARROWS-1607 S CRAWFORD, FORT SCOTT, KS 66701  POSITION 3

JOSH JONES-617 FAIRWAY, FORT SCOTT, KS 66701 POSITION 3

SHAWN GOANS-2102 JAYHAWK RD, FORT SCOTT, KS 66701 620-223-3840 POSITION AT LARGE

LYNETTE JACKSON-25 GOLFVIEW DR, FORT SCOTT, KS 66701  POSITION AT LARGE

BILL MICHAUD-7 N MAIN ST, FORT SCOTT, KS 66701  POSITION AT LARGE

USD 235

TROY GOODRIDGE-1335 125TH, REDFIELD, KS 66769  POSITION 1

JASON SUTTERBY-148 HWY 39, SAVONBURG, KS 66772  POSITION 2

JOSHUA HARTMAN-403 CLAY ST, UNIONTOWN, KS 66779  POSITION 3

KOLBY STOCK-1486 JAYHAWK RD, FORT SCOTT, KS 66701  POSITION 3

SALLY JOHNSON-402 HILL ST, UNIONTOWN, KS 66779

FSCC BOARD OF TRUSTEES

DAVID ELLIOTT-1779 LOCUST RD, FORT SCOTT, KS 66701

KIRK HART-715 S LITTLE ST, FORT SCOTT, KS 66701

MICHAEL HOYT-1315 BEECH ST, FORT SCOTT, KS 66701

CURTIS LEAR-643 MAPLE RD, UNIONTOWN, KS 66779

ROBERT NELSON-216 N LINCOLN ST, FORT SCOTT, KS 66701

SOUTHWIND EXTENSION DISTRICT

DIANE BRILLHART-412 130TH ST, FORT SCOTT, KS 66701

PETE WILEY-1476 225TH ST, FORT SCOTT, KS 66701

The school districts of Girard, USD 248 and Arma, USD 346, overlap slightly into Bourbon County, because of this, the following candidates are on the Bourbon County ballot, according to Kendell Mason, Bourbon County Clerk.

USD 248

DALE SHIREMAN-206 E. HOWARD, GIRARD, KS 66743 POSITION 1

ROGER L. BRENEMAN-803 N. LEONARD, GIRARD, KS 66743 POSITION 2

DAVE GOBLE-478 W 680TH AVE, GIRARD, KS 66743 POSITION 3

LORI JOHNSON-124 E. 630TH ST, GIRARD, KS 66743 AT LARGE

USD 346

MAX KRULL-307 W KANSAS AVE, BLUE MOUND, KS 66010 POSITION 3

BRENT PADDOCK-6360 INGRAHM RD, MOUND CITY, KS 66056 AT LARGE

Music Entertainment at Pioneer Harvest Fiesta Oct. 19-20

At the entertainment tent at Pioneer Harvest Fiesta, there will be music and events starting at 10 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 19 through 4 p.m.

Mike Lundeen will be on the keyboard; David Prickett, guitar and vocal, The Carlsons, guitar, bass, harmonica and vocals;The Eastsiders, Steve Fortenbury on guitar and others of the Heritage Park Pavilion performers.

Sunday’s events will commence with a 9:30 a.m. church service provided by Rev. Paul Rooks and the Grace Baptist Church.

Following the church service, there will be an open mike period for musicians to gather, until 2 p.m.

Lucci’s Cafe: A New Addition To Fort Scott Restaurant Choices

The staff of Lucci’s Cafe: front from left are Camiren Defebaugh, waitress; Theresa Carter, waitress; Naz Veliu, owner; and Paige Nelson, waitress. Back row is Kurjan Veliu, manager; Donny Veliu, host and Adem Veliu, cook.

Lucci’s Café, 101 S. State Street, opened Oct. 7.

The new restaurant is located in the Rodeway Inn and can be seen from Hwy. 69 by passersby.

Lucci’s Cafe, with Hwy. 69 on the east side of the restaurant.

“We serve breakfast, lunch, and dinner all day,” Donny Veliu, host at the restaurant said. ” We have omelets, skillets, hand-breaded pork tenderloin, hand-breaded country fried steak, burgers, fries, fish, steaks, and much more!”

The hours currently are 7 AM-3 PM Monday-Wednesday. 7 AM-9 PM Thursday-Saturday. 7 AM-3 PM  on Sunday.

It is a family business owned by Nazmije “Naz” Veliu,  with three of her sons also working there.

Krujan Veliu is the manager, Adem Veliu is the cook and Donny Veliu is the host.

The restaurant is named after Naz.

“I am known as Lucci, which means aunt in Albanian,” she said.

Naz came with her family from Albania, a European country on the Mediterrean Sea, in 1977.

“Our grandfather, Ben Balazi, paved the way for us to live here in America,” Donny said. “He died one-and-one-half months ago.”

“We love this country,” he said.

Ben Balazi started  a restaurant in Springfield, MO.

Naz Veliu’s brother owns the Farmhouse Cafe in Pittsburg.

Another brother owns a restaurant in Cassville, MO.

“We were raised in the restaurant business,” Naz said. “We all love it. We’ve tried other stuff and we always go back to it.”

Naz has been looking around the area for a restaurant to begin their new restaurant business.

“We heard Fort Scott was in need of another restaurant,” Donny said. “We fell in love with Fort Scott as soon as we came to see the restaurant. The people of Fort Scott are great! We’ve received such a warm welcome and we can’t thank them enough!”

The restaurant is in the  Rodeway Inn, owned by Sam Bhakta.

“They (the Bhakta family) have been wonderful, helpful and caring”, Naz said.

The hours for the restaurant will change when the family relocates to Fort Scott from Pittsburg, Naz said.

The phone number of the business: 620-644-3490.

The menu is viewed below:

 

 

USD 234 Board of Education Minutes of Oct. 14

 

 

Members of the USD 234 Board of Education met on Monday, October 14, 2019, at the Board of Education office for their regular monthly meeting.

President David Stewart opened the meeting.  The board approved the official agenda.  The board also approved the consent agenda as follows:

A.    Minutes

B.    Bills and Claims

C.    Payroll – September 30, 2019 – $1,369,443.01

D.    Financial Report

E.     Bond Proceeds Reconciliation

F.     Activity Fund Accounts

G.    Extended Trip requests

H.    Fundraiser requests

 

Several patrons spoke in the public forum section.  Gary Elliott, with Benchmark, Inc., gave a roof repair update.  Stephanie George, KNEA President, presented a report.  Administrators from each building shared reports with board members.

Superintendent Ted Hessong provided information on the following items:

·       Emergency Operations Plan

·       Legislative Update

·       KASB Regional Roundtable

·       Kansans CAN

·       Administrative Council meetings

·       Special Education

·       BOLD Program

 

Gina Shelton, Business Manager, reported on audits for the district, open enrollment for benefits, bids, and insurance appraisals.

Martin Altieri, Winfield Scott Assistant Principal, reviewed the updated 2019-20 Emergency Operations Plan.  Board members approved the 2019-20 EOP.  Board members also approved the Benchmark, Inc. service agreement and a roof payment.  The board reviewed the September 20 enrollment count report.

Board members shared comments and then went into executive session to discuss personnel matters for nonelected personnel and returned to open meeting.

The board approved the following employment items:

A.    Adjustment in contract for Tracy Homan, high school librarian/media center teacher, to include middle school librarian/media center teacher for the 2019-20 school year

B.    Adjustment in work agreement for Moriah Dillow, Winfield Scott paraprofessional, from 7.5 hours per day to 5 hours per day for the 2019-20 school year

C.    Transfer of Randi Witt, middle school secretary, to special education secretary/Medicaid billing clerk for the 2019-20 school year

D.    Addition of a high school paraprofessional position for the 2019-20 school year

E.     Employment of Whitney Ball as a middle school secretary for the 2019-20 school year

F.     Employment of Emily Matkin as a high school teacher aide for the 2019-20 school year

G.    Employment of Ashley Rodriguez as a high school teacher aide (ISS) for the 2019-20 school year

H.    Employment of Shelley Rooks as a middle school teacher aide (vocal accompanist) for the 2019-20 school year

I.      Employment of Marie Henderson as a high school paraprofessional for the 2019-20 school year

J.      Employment of Daniel Long as a high school paraprofessional for the 2019-20 school year

K.    Employment of Codee Budd as a Winfield Scott paraprofessional for the 2019-20 school year

L.     Employment of Stacey Gingrich as a gifted paraprofessional for the 2019-20 school year

M.   Employment of Jamie Patterson as a preschool paraprofessional for the 2019-20 school year

N.    Termination of Danielle Hull as high school assistant cheerleading sponsor, effective September 27, 2019

O.    Employment of Russ Hughes as a middle school assistant track coach (fourth intramural session) for the 2019-20 school year

P.     Employment of Brooke Senkevech as a middle school third session intramural coach for the 2019-20 school year

 

The board adjourned.

Mental Illness by Patty LaRoche

Patty LaRoche

Dylan Bennett recently was arrested for the murder of his parents, former NFL player Barry Bennett and his wife, Carol. Last December, Barry told the Todd County Sheriff’s Office that Dylan had expressed thoughts about killing his parents while he was in a mental health treatment facility.

The problem of mental illness is escalating. Research shows that one in five people will face some sort of mental illness or brain disease in their lifetime, one in fourteen live with major depression and one in six with an anxiety disorder. It is a potential cause blamed for Connor Betts’ murderous rampage in Dayton, Ohio, as he had posted on his Twitter bio that he was going to hell and not coming back. Who in his “right mind” would brag about such a claim?

Last year I wrote about Agnes, a mentally ill woman I tried to help in Jacksonville, Florida. She knew enough to show up at the homeless shelter to eat but not enough to bathe, change her clothes or make sense when she spoke. The shelter knew her well, but the supervisor told me that there are some people who are “too far gone” to accept the kind of help to get them off the streets. Agnes is one of them.

An article written by Kimberly Amadeo entitled “Deinstitutionalization, Its Causes, Effects, Pros and Cons” claims that because of the closings of state hospitals, 2.2 million severely mentally ill patients receive no psychiatric treatment. Nearly 200,000 of those who suffer from schizophrenia or bipolar disorder are homeless, and more than 300,00 are in jails and prisons. Others like Dylan Bennett are released too soon or not adequately treated.

I know two families who have attempted to have their sons committed to institutions but were told that until they were an actual threat, nothing could be done. Psychiatric hospitalizations ended after three days, and judges, by law, could not order their adult children to stay in treatment, even though research indicates that a combination of that and medication has the greatest chance of helping those in need.

The Church has remained silent on the subject, even though our pews are filled with individuals that no pot luck or mission statement can fix, and counseling them to “pray harder” or “have more faith” only heaps condemnation on their emotionally-damaged spirits. For years, mental illness was blamed on sin, but we now know that is not typically the case. Granted, there is drug-induced mental illness, but much is caused by the interconnections of environment, genetics and brain abnormalities. The real tragedy is that many sufferers fail to reach out because they feel judged and rejected. Where is the Church?

I recently read a sermon series by Rev. Tim Ahrens of the First Congregational Church in Columbus, Ohio, entitled “Mental Illness: The Journey In, The Journey Out” which, when delivered, filled the pews to overflowing. He asked that we speak to these people, not as “crazies,” but as people with a mental challenge. “Just as I don’t say about a person with MS or cancer that they ARE ‘MS’ or call them ‘that cancer person,’ so I should not label someone as schizophrenic or depressed. Always a person first. Always!”

The apostle Paul gave us advice on how we can reach out to those suffering around us. He writes of his own mysterious illness (guesses range from his eyesight to depression): “Even though my illness was a trial to you, you did not treat me with contempt or scorn. Instead, you welcomed me as if I were an angel of God, as if I were Christ Jesus himself.” (Galatians 4:14)

May we come alongside these hurting individuals and be that welcoming angel.

Christians have a responsibility to care for the vulnerable and not shun those who suffer. They need us to open our eyes and fight for change. They need our presence. They need our prayers. They need our grace.

American Legion Riders Charter Oct. 19

The chartering of Fort Scott American Legion Riders will take place at 10 am, Saturday, October 19 at Memorial Hall. Memorial Hall is located at the corner of National and 3rd Streets in downtown Fort Scott.
T0 join the American Legion Riders, you must have a motorcycle of at least 2500 cc’s OR have previously been a member of the Riders but can longer ride a motorcycle due to heath reasons.
Additionally, you must be an current member of the American Legion, American Legion Auxiliary or the Sons of the American Legion. I will be on hand to accept applications for the listed American Legion programs.
Submitted by Carl Jowers

Butcher Block Customer Appreciation Oct. 19

The Butcher Block
invites you to their
3rd Anniversary &
Customer Appreciation Event
This weekend!
Saturday, October 19th, 10am-???
SPECIALS valid through
Saturday see below!
The smokers will be going,
samples will be offered & great food available,
koozies for giveaway, drawings to enter
come join the party!
1735 S. National Ave.
Phone: (620) 644-5115
Click here for the Facebook event to add it to your calendar!
3 YEARS IN BUSINESS SALE!
·     BUY 3 KC STRIP GET 1 FREE
·   BUY 3 RIBEYE GET 1 FREE
·      10% OFF ALL MEAT BUNDLES
·    $1 OFF ALL LARGE BOTTLE GARHOLE SEASONING
·   $2 OFF ALL PIES
·    SEASONED BUTTERFLY PORKCHOPS $2.50EA
·    $1 OFF BRATS
(PKG OF 4 OR MORE)
·    $1 OFF PER LB. CHICKEN BREASTS
·      $1 OFF PER LB.
BREAKFAST SAUSAGE
TAKE 10% OFF EVERY ITEM IN THE STORE THAT IS NOT SALE PRICED!!!
Sale ends Saturday, October 19th.
Click here for their Facebook page to stay current on future sales & featured items!
_________
SAVE THE DATE
for Butcher Block’s
2nd Annual Halloween Party
Thursday, October 31st, 4-9pm
Smoked Turkey Legs &
Hot Dogs for the kiddos!
_____________
They also serve lunch daily
from 11am-2pm!
________
THANK YOU
Geoff & Carrie Southwell
Brian & Rebecca Williams
for your Chamber membership &
for having your small business
here in our community!
CONGRATS ON 3 YEARS!

Bo Co Economic Development Community Goals

Submitted by Jody Hoener, Bourbon County Economic Development Director

Bourbon County Economic Development is actively working on countywide goals to enhance our economic growth, lower property tax, and address population decline. We are addressing the current business climate with strategies to increase revenue through adding value, and therefore lowering the individual tax burden.

By providing opportunity for a privately developed multi-use facility with a focus on participatory sports, such as rodeo, we will inject added value into the community which will increase opportunities for recreation and assist retail business with increased sales revenue and foot traffic.

Bourbon County community has identified business, housing, and quality of life as their top three priorities.

Data collected from County surveys and face to face interviews on current business needs indicate that property tax burden is one of the top issues business face, second only to workforce needs.

Currently, the countywide average mill levy is $180.77 per $1000 assessed valuation, ranking Bourbon County 11th highest in the State of Kansas (Kansas Department of Revenue, 2018).

We are preparing for a marathon, not a sprint, to address our current tax climate, with long term goals of becoming more regionally competitive at $158.61 per $1000 assessed valuation by the year 2030.

We are leveraging community strengths and assets to create a more business-friendly environment in a place people want to live, work and play.

Fort Scott Community College is renowned nationwide for its rodeo team and Fort Scott is located on an intersection of two major highways. A grassroots committee of former rodeo team athletes, business owners, and public sector, with support from the community college president and rodeo team coach, has formed to see a privately developed multi-use facility constructed.

Bourbon County Commission, as part of its ongoing efforts to enhance livability and quality of life for its residents and to grow our economic base and resulting job opportunities, has commissioned a feasibility study for a multi-use event facility to be located in the Fort Scott area.

Markin Consulting, a national consulting firm specializing in these types of facilities, is conducting this two-phase study.

The first phase is an intense look at the market viability of this type of facility.

We are thankful for Bourbon County stakeholder’s Jim Keller, of Keller Ranch, and Steve Buerge, of Buerge Farms and Buerge Enterprises, Inc. who have made substantial contributions toward the market demand study. By completing rigorous cost benefit analysis, we are not only showing to be good stewards of tax payor resources but we are also planning for the future.

The decisions we make on investments today will determine the productivity, wages, and quality of life for generations to come. To grow a sustainable, thriving, prosperous community, we are developing creative and dynamic strategies, fostering public/private partnerships, and encourage civic participation.

We believe the feasibility study for the multi-use event facility is very important to our business community and are asking business and residents for your help by taking time to complete a very short, on-line survey for this study process.

Here’s the link for the resident survey: http://sgiz.mobi/s3/Bourbon-County-Event-Center-Survey

And here’s the link for the business survey: http://sgiz.mobi/s3/Bourbon-County-Business-Needs-Survey

 

For more information please contact:

Jody Hoener, Economic Development Director

620-215-5725

Jhoener@bourboncountyks.org

Festival Oct. 19 To Encourage Creative Writing

The Lowell Milken Center is located at the corner of First and Wall Street and is the site of the Fort Scott Writing Festival.
A collaborative project to encourage creative writing in the community is taking place this Saturday, Oct. 19 at Lowell Milken Center for Unsung Heroes at Main and Wall Street.
“It was a culmination of several peoples ideas in thinking about how to support and encourage writing in our community,” Jan Hedges, owner of Hedgehog.INK, said. “Writing is an aspect of the arts that is not often recognized.”
The event is co-sponsored by the Bourbon County Arts Council, Fort Scott Area Chamber of Commerce, Books and Grannies Book Store and Hedgehog.INK!
It is a one-day event for gathering published authors to share their writing and publishing experiences with the community.
The morning session is a series of one-hour workshops  that is open to high school and local college students as well as adults.
There is no cost for students to attend the workshops.
In the afternoon, there will be a fair for authors to showcase their work and answer questions from aspiring writers.
Also in the afternoon there will be three mini-lessons, 30 minutes each for the public to view.

Program Schedule

Registration: 8:30 and refreshments (inside front doors)

Opening Remarks: 8:50 Little Theater

Finding Your Writing Plan – 9:00 Little Theater

Presenter R.J. Thesman

Are you stuck between writer’s block and the fun of procrastination? Maybe you’re not blocked. You just don’t have a writing plan. Finding Your Writing Plan helps you develop a discipline for your writing craft and keeps you from avoiding that blank page. Especially for bi-vocational writers who work another job, Finding Your Writing Plan gives you a structure for each day’s work. You can still nurture your creative side by choosing more than one plan or by changing your plan, depending on your circumstances. RJ Thesman will present 12 different options for your writing plan with best practices to help you finish your Work in Progress and move toward your publishing dreams. 

RJ Thesman, CLC, BSE Author / Writing Coach / Editor Speaker

* * * * * * * * *

Writing FOR a Child Requires Thinking LIKE a Child” – 9:00 Conference Room

Presenter: Cathy Werling

Have you often thought you would like to write a children’s book? With the current self-publishing opportunities available, the goal of writing and publishing a children’s book has become much more attainable. Through this presentation, you will learn how to get started, some important steps you need to consider before you actually start writing, and some available resources to help your children’s book become a reality.

Cathy Werling is a retired elementary educator, who works part-time at the Lowell Milken Center for Unsung Heroes. The opportunity to provide positive role models for children led to the Center’s Unsung Heroes book series for children. Cathy is the author of the first four books in the series, with plans to continue sharing more of the amazing stories of Unsung Heroes through additional books. Her goal is to, not only provide inspirational role models for elementary students, but to encourage them to be people who can also make a positive difference in the world around them.

* * * * * * * * *

Self Publishing – 10:00 Little Theater

Presenter: Sally Freeman Jadlow

Come learn how to publish your own book, step-by-step, in paperback or ebook through Amazon.com. Handouts will accompany the class.

Sally Jadlow has published eleven books which have gone through the process Amazon offers authors. She writes award-winning historical fiction, inspirational short stories, non-fiction, devotionals and poetry. Sally has also been published in many magazine articles and anthologies. She teaches writing for the the Kansas City Writers Group in the spring and fall.

Know Your Sources – 10:00 Conference Room

Presenter: Ronda Hassig

Primary sources can be mysterious, exciting, and lead to creative writing at its finest.  If you want to write non-fiction or historical fiction you will need to know your sources!  When you leave this session, you will know what a source is, where to find it, how to use it and how to document it. 

Ronda Hassig is a retired Kansas Master Teacher and middle school librarian.  She is the author of two books including “The Abduction of Jacob Rote” and “The Greatest Test of Courage.”  Ronda loves reading, writing, and walking her three feral dogs!  

* * * * * * * * * *

Workshop Drawing – 10:55

Transformative Works & the Online Writing Experience – 11:00 Little Theater

Presenter: Qwen Salsbury

Discussion of the popularity and opportunities in online writing. How to build an online following, locate writing e-communities, and the bridge to publishing. Exploration of the importance of transformative works in society’s need to own its own stories. Presentation by author Qwen Salsbury, Amazon #1 Best-Selling author, whose online works have over 5 million unique hits. 

* * * * * * * * * *

Writing the Poetic Image – 11:00 Conference Room

Presenter: Laura Lee Washburn

Laura Lee Washburn will lead this workshop on imagery.  Poets will participate in a poetic game as well as write a short lyric or narrative free verse poem.  

Washburn is the author of two books of poetry, This Good Warm Place (March Street) and Watching the Contortionists (Palanquin Chapbook Prize).  Her poetry has appeared in numerous journals including Poet Lore and The Sun.  Harbor Review’s Washburn Chapbook prize is named in her honor.  She directs the Creative Writing Program at Pittsburg State.

12:00 – 1:30 Lunch Break

Authors set up for the Authors Fair

Afternoon Mini-Sessions – Conference

1:30 Thomas Yoke

2:15 Kate Emmett-Sweetser

3:00 Jan Hedges

Why I Just Now Write” – 1:30 Conference Room

Presenter: Tom Yoke

It took me 60 years to fulfill the dream of becoming an author. The roadblocks and obstacles I had to overcome, are the motivation for telling my story. I want to encourage anyone of any age or circumstance to pursue that dream.

The main points of the talk are:

  • Listening to the right voices
  • Daring to believe in yourself
  • Dreaming big dreams
  • Following your heart’s hidden desire

* * * * * * * * * *

 

NaNoWriMo and Poem-a-Day: Write. Every. Day. – 2:15 Conference Room

Presenter: Kate Emmett-Sweetser

Though raised by a professor of British literature and a poet, Kate Emmett-Sweetser prefers to write non-fiction. She has worked as a free-lance journalist in both English and Spanish, as a translator, and as a Spanish adjunct at Pittsburg State University. She is currently working on a book about the Jewish families who lived in SE Kansas in the decades following the Civil War. Her biggest challenges are perfectionism and procrastination; she will share ways to adapt fiction- and poetry-writing prompts and goals to all genres of writing. 

* * * * * * * * * *

The Art of Journaling – 3:00 Conference Room

Presenter: Jan Hedges

We each have a great deal to write about already tucked in our own heads. Journaling is a way to keep track of and organize these thoughts, musings and ideas. This session will cover the many aspects of journaling, how-to’s, inspiration and motivation. A drawing for a journal will be held at the end of the session.

Jan Hedges is a retired teacher and school administrator. She and her husband Dick opened Hedgehog.INK! Gently Used Books and So Much More… in October 2018. She has dabbled in writing for over 50 years. I write because I must.

* * * * * * * * * *

Author Fair Participants: (Tentative List)

Ronda Hassig Young Adult Historical Fiction

Gerri Hilger Adult Historical Fiction

Sally Freeman Jadlow Adult Christian Living/Memoir/Poetry…

Joyce Love Children/Young Adult Historical Fiction / Devotional

Eric Reynolds Adult Historical Fiction

Carol Russell Young Adult Historical Fiction

Sally Smith Adult Christian Living

R.J. Thesman Adult Christian Living / Fiction…

Laura Lee Washburn Poetry

Cathy Werling Children Children

Thomas Yoke Adult Fiction

 Shirley Fessel

Jena Fellers

 

 
 

USD234 Parent Teacher Conferences Oct. 21-22, NO School Oct. 25

Parent/Teacher conferences for the USD 234 School District will be held on Monday, October 21, and Tuesday, October 22.

Conferences will be
held at the following times:
Fort Scott Preschool Center – 4:20 to 7:50 p.m.
Winfield Scott and Eugene Ware – 4: l5 to 7:45 p.m.
Fort Scott Middle School and Fort Scott High School – 4:30 to 8:00 p.m.

There will be no school for USD 234 students on Friday, October 25.

Classes will resume on Monday, October 28.

Contact: Ted Hessong
Superintendent of Schools
USD 234
424 S. Main
Fort Scott, KS 66701