Category Archives: Community Health Center of Southeast Kansas

CHC Update From Krista Postai

Krista Postai. Submitted.

Community Health Center of Southeast Kansas is moving forward on the renovation of the former Price Chopper building on South Main.

“We are waiting on (City of Fort Scott) building permits before moving forward on the Price Chopper building, so there is nothing major to report,” CEO and President of CHC/SEK Krista Postai, said. “Apparently, the engineer is on vacation.”

Update later in the day from Postai: “We were issued a temporary 90-day-permit yesterday and we’re back to work,” she said.

The land given CHC on the west side of the former Mercy building, which they had made plans to build a new facility on, is being given back to Bourbon County who owns the building.

“Regarding the land,” she said. “Which is basically the large parking lot behind the hospital plus the helipad, we were told by the county, it would be needed by whoever opted to assume responsibility for the hospital. Our Board agreed to exchange the land, which actually cost us about $125,000 in legal and platting fees, for our remaining rent on our clinic in the hospital. We do understand that was approved by the county commission and they would be in touch with us to finalize the agreement.”

“Once we have the transfer formalized, it will go to the CHC/SEK Board for final approval, Postai said. “It was suggested to us that there is another potential group interested in reopening the hospital now that Noble has moved on.”

Commissioner Beth Comment on The Former Mercy Building

Bourbon County Commissioner Clifton Beth said the county is “still trying to engage with several entities to do something with the building. We’ve been doing this for two years. I want to make sure we have an emergency room in Bourbon County and sustainable health care.”

Recent Mammogram Walk-In

“We had a record number of women get a mammogram at our Walk-In event from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. on July 27th in Ft. Scott,” she said. “Ninety-one women over age 40  ‘walked in’ and received a 3D mammogram regardless of ability to pay. CHC/SEK continued the effort August 2 and 3rd at their Pittsburg clinic. The goal is to increase the number of women who have had mammograms in southeast Kansas – which falls far below the state and national averages.”

Jobs at CHC

The following are the current list of job openings in Fort Scott for CHC:

 

Walk-In Mammograms Today at CHC

CHC/SEK Fort Scott to provide walk-in mammograms July 27

FORT SCOTT — Community Health Center of Southeast Kansas is hosting a walk-in mammogram event for women age 40 and older who have not received a recent mammogram. 

The event will be from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Wednesday, July 27 at the Fort Scott main clinic located at 401 Woodland Hills Blvd Fort Scott. Refreshments and a gift will be provided.

Women in Southeast Kansas rank far below state and national averages in receiving this life-saving screening, and having the service available within the clinic helps remove barriers many women have in receiving timely breast cancer screenings. Likewise, the walk-in event will give patients an option on when they can arrive. 

Because CHC/SEK believes every woman should have the best quality mammogram available, every patient receives a 3D exam. A physician’s referral is also not required. The screening is available to eligible women regardless of ability to pay. 

CHC/SEK uses the Hologic Genius system that screens the breast in 4 seconds for a much less compression time, with less radiation exposure than many conventional mammography machines. The Genius exam is also superior for denser breasts that that can hide early signs of cancer in a traditional mammogram. 

In addition, the Hologic Genius scans potentially reduce patient callback by up to 40 percent compared to 2D, sparing the emotional and economic toll of additional testing, including biopsies when there could be nothing wrong. 

For more information people can call 620-223-8484.

CHC/SEK Fort Scott to provide walk-in mammograms July 27 

 

Sliding fee discounts and financial assistance is available to eligible patients, as stated on the front door of the CHC/SEK Clinic in Fort Scott.

FORT SCOTT — Community Health Center of Southeast Kansas is hosting a walk-in mammogram event for women age 40 and older who have not received a recent mammogram. 

The event will be from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Wednesday, July 27 at the Fort Scott main clinic located at 401 Woodland Hills Blvd Fort Scott. Refreshments and a gift will be provided.

Women in Southeast Kansas rank far below state and national averages in receiving this life-saving screening, and having the service available within the clinic helps remove barriers many women have in receiving timely breast cancer screenings. Likewise, the walk-in event will give patients an option on when they can arrive. 

Because CHC/SEK believes every woman should have the best quality mammogram available, every patient receives a 3D exam. A physician’s referral is also not required. The screening is available to eligible women regardless of ability to pay. 

CHC/SEK uses the Hologic Genius system that screens the breast in 4 seconds for a much less compression time, with less radiation exposure than many conventional mammography machines. The Genius exam is also superior for denser breasts that that can hide early signs of cancer in a traditional mammogram. 

In addition, the Hologic Genius scans potentially reduce patient callback by up to 40 percent compared to 2D, sparing the emotional and economic toll of additional testing, including biopsies when there could be nothing wrong. 

For more information people can call 620-223-8484.

CHC/SEK Fort Scott to provide walk-in mammograms July 27 

 

FORT SCOTT — Community Health Center of Southeast Kansas is hosting a walk-in mammogram event for women age 40 and older who have not received a recent mammogram.

 

The event will be from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Wednesday, July 27 at the Fort Scott main clinic located at 401 Woodland Hills Blvd Fort Scott. Refreshments and a gift will be provided.

Women in Southeast Kansas rank far below state and national averages in receiving this life-saving screening, and having the service available within the clinic helps remove barriers many women have in receiving timely breast cancer screenings. Likewise, the walk-in event will give patients an option on when they can arrive. 

Because CHC/SEK believes every woman should have the best quality mammogram available, every patient receives a 3D exam.  A physician’s referral is also not required. The screening is available to eligible women regardless of ability to pay. 

CHC/SEK uses the Hologic Genius system that screens the breast in 4 seconds for a much less compression time, with less radiation exposure than many conventional mammography machines. The Genius exam is also superior for denser breasts that that can hide early signs of cancer in a traditional mammogram. 

In addition, the Hologic Genius scans potentially reduce patient callback by up to 40 percent compared to 2D, sparing the emotional and economic toll of additional testing, including biopsies when there could be nothing wrong. 

For more information people can call 620-670-6710.

 

 

Healthcare In Fort Scott: It’s Complicated

Mercy Hospital Fort Scott closed in December 2018. It currently houses Community Health Center of Southeast Kansas, Ascension Via Christi Emergency Department,  and I AM Rehab.

In December 2018, Mercy Hospital Fort Scott closed its’ doors.

Following this, Community Health Center of Southeast Kansas reopened a medical clinic at the site at 401 Woodland Hills Blvd. and Ascension Via Christi Hospital opened an emergency department, sharing a portion of the former hospital.

They both have leases until December 2022.

Noble Health Corporation entered the picture in 2021.

They completed a feasibility study for the Bourbon County Commission for reopening a hospital.

The City of Fort Scott contributed $200,000, the county contributed $800,000 towards the feasibility study, according to the contract that was signed June 25, 2021. The local government entities used American Rescue Plan money from the federal government for the project, according to Bourbon County Commissioner Clifton Beth in a prior interview with fortscott.biz.

Noble Health Announces Reopening a Hospital in Fort Scott

On June 3, Noble Health’s 179 page Feasibility Assessment to reopen the hospital in Fort Scott was published on the Bourbon County website.

It can be viewed here: BBCO-Hospitial-Feasibilty-Assessment

On June 15, a comprehensive investigative story on Noble Health from Sara Jane Tribble with Kaiser Health News, was posted online.

It reported that Noble Health has a troubled history with operating two hospitals in Missouri.

It can be viewed here: Noble Health: History of Failed Health Care For Patients

CHC Feasibility Study

A prior feasibility assessment by Community Health Center of Southeast Kansas had helped that health care system to make the decision to move to a different building, Krista Postai, CEO and President of CHC/SEK said.

In an interview with her, Postai was asked to compare the Noble Health Assessment to the CHC Assessment that was completed after CHC moved into the former Mercy Hospital building in 2018.

“We have a very comprehensive, detailed report county-by-county that has all the data one needs to make an informed decision on services, location, etc.,” she said.  “We also have a strategic plan that is updated annually that maps out where we’re going, new services, etc. Prior to accepting Mercy’s offer to take their clinics, we had already prioritized Ft. Scott because we had almost 2,000 patients from Bourbon County which is enough to justify a site.”

“There was nothing new in Noble’s report that we already didn’t know or hadn’t already been discussed, including the rural emergency hospital concept that Ascension had always planned on pursuing if feasible,” she said. “In fact, much of our data is more current (2021) although, unfortunately, southeast Kansas isn’t getting healthier or wealthier so changes over the last 20 years have been minimal.”

Ascension Via Christ medical system brought an emergency department back to Fort Scott following Mercy Hospital’s closure and shares part of the former Mercy Hospital building with CHC.

“When we first agreed to transition Mercy’s clinic in the hospital over to us, Mercy indicated we had two years to find another location,” she said. “It was their belief that the building would ultimately be demolished unless we wanted to assume responsibility for it.”

“We sliced and diced all the costs based on actual operational data that Mercy supplied us and factored in roof replacement, the chillers and the boilers….all the things that were nearing the end of their useful life,” Postai said. “We also visited with multiple organizations about their interest in leasing space on a long-term basis that would cover the cost to operate and maintain it.”

“At that point, the county opted to present a counter proposal to Ascension at a much lower price per sq. ft. that would require the county to subsidize it, which they indicated they were willing to do. It seemed wise at that point to step back and let the county take the lead since emergency services was their priority.”

Decision to Move to Another Site

“Concerned about the ongoing costs of maintaining the building – and wanting a more efficient design plus a drive-in pharmacy, plus more diagnostic equipment and space to expand behavioral health services — we begin laying plans to move….and approached the Price Chopper owners about their building,” Postai said. “At that time, the asking price was way too high for us, so we asked Mercy for land on which to build which is how we got the eight acres behind the hospital.  As we began design on a new building, the Price Chopper price dropped and we agreed it would be faster to renovate….and it was an ideal location. As we calculated, it was more financially feasible to own the building and make loan payments than it was to pay rent on space in a building with an uncertain future.”

The Price Chopper building, 2322 S. Main, is currently being remodeled into a health care clinic by Community Health Center of Southeast Kansas.

CHC/SEK announces new community award, The Judy 

CHC/SEK board member Judy Westhoff, left, stands with CHC/SEK CEO Krista Postai after receiving the Sheridan Award on Thursday during the annual Employee Service Awards Recognition Banquet.

PITTSBURG — Community Health Center of Southeast Kansas will present a new community service award in conjunction with its 20th year celebration. This award will be named after CHC/SEK board member Judy Westhoff, coined “The Judy.”

Westhoff is one of the original board of directors, having served 19 years without missing one of more than 220 meetings.

The “Judy” award will be given to an individual or an organization that is making or has made significant contributions to CHC/SEK, to the patients in the communities that it serves. Awardees will demonstrate a passion for helping others by exemplifying CHC/SEK’s core values of service, stewardship, excellence and kindness.

“We can think of no better individual in which to name this award,” said Jason Wesco, CHC/SEK President and Chief Strategy Officer during the annual Employee Service Awards Recognition Banquet on Thursday evening.  

In addition to the announcement of the award, Westhoff was also recognized with the Sheridan Award that evening. CHC/SEK presents an annual Sheridan Award to someone who has made an impact on the clinic. The Sheridan Award was named after Mother Mary Bernard Sheridan, CSJ, who in 1903 opened Mt. Carmel Hospital on the land at which the CHC/SEK Pittsburg clinic now sits. Mother Bernard instructed her small group of Sisters at the hospital (there was no paid staff then) to “do all the good we can, in all the ways we can, to all the people we can and just as long as we can,” and their legacy continues to guide the health center today.  

“Our honoree has worked tirelessly for many years with countless volunteer hours to support educational, artistic, social services, healthcare, fundraising, friendraising, advocacy and giving both during her distinguished career in banking and as the downtown development director and in her retirement,” Wesco said. “There certainly hasn’t been a more apt description of her commitment to this community.”

Westhoff has supported, just to name a few, Pittsburg State University, Pittsburg Community Theatre, the Colonial Fox Theatre, the YMCA, Girl Scouts, Elm Acres, the Childrens Advocacy Resource Center, Rotary, The Family Resource Center and the Community Health Center of Southeast Kansas. She has been a Women of Distinction, received PSU’s Rex Crawley Service Award, is in the Pittsburg Family YMCA Hall of Fame, and received the Pittsburg Area Chamber of Commerce Spirit of Pittsburg award.

“I have been able to receive a lot more from Community Health Center than I’ve put in for my family and myself,” Westhoff said. “I can’t tell you of all the people out here who have been so helpful and so kind and care about everything they do. It’s just amazing. I just can’t begin to tell everybody how much I appreciate everything they do. Thank you.”

                                                                

 

Postai: CHC Expansion Impacts Fort Scott Positively

Community Health Center of Southeast Kansas is  proceeding with what will ultimately be a $10 million investment in their newly renovated building in Fort Scott that they are fully funding, according to Krista Postai, CEO and President.

The  renovation project is located at the former Price Chopper building at 2322 S. Main.

“We are on schedule to be in the new building in December as planned,” she said. “We did discover tunnels underneath the former grocery store that we weren’t expecting which came as quite the surprise, but are addressing the situation especially in those areas which will be supporting heavy equipment such as the CT Scanner and Mammography Unit.”

Renovation began Feb. 2022 on the future CHC/SEK Fort Scott Clinic in the former Price Chopper building on South Main Street.
The Price Chopper building, 2322 S. Main.

CHC currently is housed in a portion of the former Fort Scot Mercy Hospital on Woodland Hill Blvd. but their lease is up in December 2022.

Community Health Center of Southeast Kansas, 403 Woodland Hills Blvd.

Postai Provides Impact Studies

CHC/SEK and Fort Scott were featured in a national case study focusing on the transition of the Mercy Clinics to CHC/SEK, Postai said.

Postai attached the case findings plus the information compiled on the economic impact on the community, which were completed by Capital Link.  Capital Link is a national, non-profit organization that has worked with community health centers and
primary care associations for over 25 years to plan for sustainability and growth, access capital, articulate value and improve and optimize operations and financial management,  according to info in the study.

The current CHC project value to the community is shown to have both temporary impacts during construction and ongoing impacts from expanded operations including economic, employment and tax impacts.

To view the detailed study:

Capital Project Value Impact of Community Health Center of Southeast Kansas Fort Scott-1

 

The introduction to the case study:

“When Mercy Hospital Fort Scott (Mercy) closed its doors in Fort Scott, Kansas, after 132 years in operation, the rural community of 7,800 was left without a hospital. In the tumultuous aftermath of this closure, Community Health Center of Southeast Kansas (CHC/SEK or CHC), a Federally
Qualified Health Center based 30 miles away in Pittsburg, Kansas, stepped forward to take over two of the closed
hospital’s primary care clinics, providing a range of primary and preventive care services in Fort Scott, partially
filling the gap left by the hospital’s closure.
The circumstances leading up to the hospital’s closure and its impact on the community have been well-
documented by Sarah Jane Tribble in NPR’s nine-episode podcast, “Where it Hurts, Season 1: No Mercy.” This
case study focuses on CHC’s response to the closure and its efforts to restore access to primary care in Fort Scott,
while the community grieved the loss of its hospital.
Through interviews with CHC/SEK’s leadership, Capital Link explored CHC/SEK’s response to Mercy’s closure,
the subsequent impact on the community and the current state of the situation, in order to highlight lessons
learned for rural centers in similar situations.”

To view the entire case findings in detail:

CHC SEK Case Study – FINAL-1

Question on Property Taxes

The CHC building at 902 S. Horton will soon be the Fort Scott Community College Nursing Department. March 2023 is the scheduled transfer.

Recently on social media there was a comment that CHC had neglected paying property tax on their building at 902 Horton Street that currently houses some of their staff and a Veteran’s Administration local office.

Postai responded with the following:

“CHC/SEK is a non-profit 501(c)3 and, like the Mercy Health System, Ascension and most other healthcare organizations is exempt from property taxes,” Postai said. “Fort Scott Community College is also exempt, as is the Veterans Administration who currently occupies the Horton Street Building along with CHC/SEK staff.”

“Appropriate paperwork has been filed and is working its way through the system and we were advised by the county to hold payments pending final determination, which is what we’ve done.”

“We had actually mailed a check to the county for the taxes, who returned it to us because they anticipate our tax-exempt status will also apply to this building and they’d just have to refund our payment,” she said.

“In the meantime, we’re proceeding with what will ultimately be a $10 million investment in our newly renovated building (on Main Street) in Ft. Scott that CHC/SEK is fully funding itself.

“Any money from the sale of the Horton Street Building will be utilized toward the redo of the former Price Chopper building (on Main Street) which will also include classrooms for use by Fort Scott Community College at no cost to them.

“A portion of the funds will also be used for scholarships at FSCC.

“We will be in the new facility by the end of December and are looking forward to expanding services, recruiting additional professionals and serving all regardless of ability to pay. 

“I am always available to answer any questions and can be reached at 620-235-1867 or on my cell at 620-249-9936. My email is [email protected]. Krista Postai, CEO, CHC/SEK.

 

 

 Who says breast cancer awareness is only for October? 

Sliding fee discounts and financial assistance is available to eligible patients, as stated on the front door of the CHC/SEK Clinic in Fort Scott.

CHC/SEK Fort Scott to host mammogram screening event

Community Health Center of Southeast Kansas is hosting Mammo Mania, a mammography screening event for women age 40 and older who have not received a recent mammogram.

The event will be from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Tuesday, May 17 at the Fort Scott main clinic located at 401 Woodland Hills Blvd Fort Scott.

Women in Southeast Kansas rank far below state and national averages in receiving this life-saving screening, and having the service available within the clinic helps remove barriers many women have in receiving timely breast cancer screenings. Likewise, the walk-in event will give patients an option on when they can arrive.

Because CHC/SEK believes every woman should have the best quality mammogram available, every patient receives a 3D exam.  A physician’s referral is also not required. The screening is available to eligible women regardless of ability to pay.

CHC/SEK uses the Hologic Genius system that screens the breast in 4 seconds for a much less compression time, with less radiation exposure than many conventional mammography machines. The Genius exam is also superior for denser breasts, that that can hide early signs of cancer in a traditional mammogram. 

In addition, the Hologic Genius scans potentially reduce patient callback by up to 40 percent compared to 2D, sparing the emotional and economic toll of additional testing, including biopsies when there could be nothing wrong.

For more information people can call 620-223-8484.

                                                                

FSCC Nursing School to Move Location

The future FSCC Nursing Department will be located at 9th and Horton, just a block southeast of its current location on Burke Street.
A letter of intent  is signed for Community Health Center of Southeast Kansas to sell the building at 902 S. Horton to Fort Scott Community College.
Fort Scott Community College President Alysia Johnston.
“We plan to move nursing there,” FSCC President Alysia Johnston said. “The time-line is to take possession in March of 2023 and begin the program there in August of 2023.”
The future of the former nursing department building on Burke Street is uncertain at this time.
“The board will have to decide, but we are thinking we will sell it,” she said. “We will not be out of the building until summer of 2023.”
 The proposed sale of the property at 902 S. Horton, is for $482,870 which is the appraised value by Bourbon County, according to the letter of intent.
The CHC building at 902 S. Horton will soon be the Fort Scott Community College Nursing Department.
CHC will provide the title to FSCC on March 1, 2023.
CHC will look for opportunities to expand their affiliation with the community college, including scholarships and educational programs, according to the document.

CHC/SEK awarded $1 grant toward transportation facility  

 

 

During a Facebook Live event on Thursday in Salina, Kansas Governor Laura Kelly announced Community Health Center of Southeast Kansas as the recipient of a $1 million grant which will go toward the construction of CHC/SEK’s Regional Transportation Facility. 

“As the largest healthcare provider in the region, CHC/SEK has long recognized that the lack of transportation is a significant healthcare disparity,” said Karlea Abel, CHC/SEK’s executive director of Building Health, Inc. Building Health, a subsidiary of CHC/SEK established in 2020, is responsible for managing CHC/SEK’s growing transportation program. “Today’s funding announcement is a big step for CHC/SEK to grow its transportation program and this will help meet Southeast Kansas’ growing transportation needs.” 

Of the 65,000 patients served by CHC/SEK, approximately 20 percent of those patients experience some form of transportation barrier to healthcare. Creating a transportation system will remove that barrier for many. 

“From public data, internal data, and numerous testimonies and anecdotes, it is clear that we’re missing community members who need more from us,” Abel said adding that a large portion of maintaining good health is beyond the doctor’s office. “If you can’t get to doctor appointments, it’s also likely you’re having trouble getting to a grocery store, or even a place of employment.” 

Specifically, the grant will create a dedicated space to house vehicles, sustain and grow the transposition program by creating space for dedicated staff, and strengthen transportation resources for all. 

This transportation facility will be located in Pittsburg and most immediately benefit Crawford and Bourbon counties …but its benefits will be felt throughout all of the neighboring counties it serves, Karlea said. 

With dedicated space and staff, CHC/SEK hopes to collaborate with other regional transportation partners with shared dispatchers, shared dispatch software, and joint marketing and public awareness, as well as supply purchasing and maintenance efforts to ensure all state-funded transit vehicles are being utilized to their maximum potential, and those needing rides are receiving them. 

 

2nd COVID-19 Boosters available at all CHC/SEK locations

Covid-19 vaccinations and boosters are available at all CHC/SEK walk-in clinics and by appointment. There are no out-of-pocket costs to receive a vaccination.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) authorization and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend adults with underlying medical conditions that increase their risk for severe disease from COVID-19 receive a booster if it has been at least 4 months from the first booster or anyone who received J&J/Janssen for both of their primary and first booster dose, if it has been at least 4 months from the first booster.

This is especially important for those 65 and older and those 50 and older with underlying medical conditions that increase their risk for severe disease from COVID-19 as they are the most likely to benefit from receiving an additional booster dose at this time.

Research suggests that for those with people with a moderately or severely weakened immune system, getting a second booster dose can decrease their risk of infection and severe illness with COVID-19.

High-risk medical conditions include: age 65 years and older, cancer, chronic kidney disease, chronic liver disease, chronic lung disease, cystic fibrosis, dementia or other neurological conditions, diabetes (type 1 or 2), other disabilities, heart conditions, HIV, immunocompromised, mental health conditions, overweight/obesity, physical inactivity, pregnancy, sickle cell or thalassemia, smoker (current or former), organ or stem-cell transplant, stroke, substance use disorder and TB. 

COVID-19 booster doses may be given at the same time as other vaccines, including the flu vaccine. When getting a booster dose, you are encouraged to bring your COVID-19 vaccine card to show the vaccine provider. To date, more than 1.5 million Kansan’s, about 61 percent, have gotten at least their first dose of one of the three safe and effective COVID-19 vaccines. Eligible individuals are encouraged to stay up to date on vaccinations, including booster doses that provide extra protection.

Those wishing to schedule a booster shot appointment may call 620-231-9873 or their local clinic numbers.

Letter to The Editor: Krista Postai

Community Health Center of Southeast Kansas was one of the largest providers of testing in southeast Kansas, completing 91,621 tests (as of this March 22) since March 2019. Of these, 21, 221 were positive results making 70,400 negative.  We have been one of the largest immunizers in the state for all adult and childhood vaccines — since our founding. We have always done this regardless of ability to pay.

As a non-profit, community-owned entity, we provide the services our communities need and request.

When we became one of the first health centers in the nation to receive vaccines, we got more than 3,000 calls in the first hour after we publicized we had vaccines,  which actually crashed our phone system. Some people drove more than 300 miles, one way, to get vaccinated.

Our physicians – many of whom provide inpatient care at local hospitals – were devastated at the number of patients we lost prior to the availability of the vaccine. We all lost people we knew and, in some cases, loved.

Up until recently, we were conducting COVID testing more than 1,100 hours per week. All 700 of our staff were exhausted dealing with all aspects of COVID-19.

This past week, when it was announced that there would no longer be payment for the uninsured to be tested for COVID, we did share (through a press release) our policy to continue to provide testing regardless of ability to pay. We do that for all diseases – flu, diabetes, hepatitis, etc.

We are committed to ensuring that everyone gets the same care because they deserve it. And, many folks are still required to demonstrate they don’t have COVID – to travel to another country, to stay in school, etc.

And, just like there are rules to drive big trucks (our staff provides Department of Transportation physicals, etc.),  we will continue to offer these services to EVERYONE,  whether they have the resources to cover the expense or not.

The public can visit with any of our staff personally to see if they’ve been encouraged in any way to “doctor” the results – most of which were originally all sent to major laboratory services who were paid the same for both negative and positive tests. As are we – when we do get paid from insurance companies and CMS – which has been less than our actual costs.

Our staff are feeling hopeful – this last week, we only had requests for 340 tests and only 12 of these were positive.

It would appear that we’re near the end of this horrible pandemic – at least for now — which resulted in delayed care for many of those with any medical problems and all but depleted our healthcare workforce.

Krista Postai, CEO and President of Community Health Center of Southeast Kansas.

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