Category Archives: K-State Extension

4-H Beef Introduction

Jennifer Terrell, K-State Extension Agent

4-H Beef

In the beef project, youth will learn all aspects of the beef industry by raising a market steer or building your own herd by raising heifers and cows.

There is 4-H Curriculum that can be purchased for anyone interested in the beef project. Here is a breakdown of what youth can learn at different levels:

Things to Learn/Do in the Project

Age 7-9

  • Identify breeds of beef cattle

  • Learn the parts of a calf

  • Compare animal differences 

  • Halter break a calf

Age 10-13

  • Learn about cattle feeds and how they are digested

  • Judge beef cattle and present oral reasons

  • Show a calf and learn showing techniques

Age 14 and Older

  • Use performance data to make breeding decisions

  • Evaluate beef carcasses and identify meat products

  • Explore impact of technology and career opportunities in the beef industry

In addition to the curriculum, youth are also offered the opportunity to attend project meetings held by volunteers. Each year, youth are able to demonstrate their hard work locally at the county fair and depending on age and placing, the Kansas State Fair. There are other local and state shows available to youth as well.

The beef project is a great opportunity for youth to learn important life skills. For more information about this project or the workshop, contact Jennifer K. Terrell, 4-H Youth Development for K-State Research and Extension – Southwind District at jkterrell@ksu.edu or 620-244-3826.

K-State’s Garden Hour – “Best Plants for a Beginning Landscape”

Krista Harding
District Extension Agent, Horticulture
Southwind Extension District
111 S. Butler
Erie, KS 66733
Office: 620-244-3826
Cell: 620-496-8786

 

The K-State Garden Hour – a popular online program featuring horticulture experts from across the state – will highlight best plants for a beginning landscape on Wednesday, March 3rd from noon to 1 p.m. Learn how to choose the right plants for your landscape including tough plants that will grow well for any level of gardener.

Garden hour programs will continue two times a month through the summer. To register and participate in the K-State Garden Hour, visit www.ksre-learn.com/KStateGardenHour-register

For more information, please contact Krista Harding, horticulture agent, at kharding@ksu.edu or 620-244-3826.

Conflict Can Be Opportunity 

Carla Nemecek is Southwind District Director and agent.

Submitted by: Carla Nemecek, Southwind Extension District Director

 

“A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty.” – Sir Winston Churchill

Conflict is challenging – I don’t enjoy it and I dread when I know in advance that conflict is headed my way. Most people perceive “conflict” as a difficulty rather than as an opportunity. Those who view conflict as the difficulty in every opportunity are not necessarily pes­simists, however they may not be viewing the conflict as a creative dynamic. The reality is, no matter what you do or how you act, there will always be some conflict — especially when you serve as a community board member.

Conflict can be both positive and negative. Conflict allows people to learn about a problem from different sides, and often the most creative ideas and solutions emerge from conflict. Negative aspects of conflict can involve frustration or confusion and sometimes lead to violence. The key to approaching conflict constructively is to recognize it as a process to be managed, not something to be avoided or eliminated.

Managing conflict requires certain skills and techniques that may not always be easy to implement.

For example, when a person learns to paint it involves learning strokes and techniques to create an image. However, only after continuous practice does the person finally become an artist. You may think of conflict management as an art that benefits everyone through learning the skills, but it takes practice implementing the tech­niques to be a skilled conflict manager.

The skills and techniques outlined here work best when the person applying them carries the attitude that conflict is about a problem that needs solving, rather than something to win.

Listen Actively

Listening involves more than simply hearing the words spoken, it also requires active involvement that includes understanding, acknowledging, and responding. To make sure you understand what the person has said summarize by saying out loud, “What I think I heard you say was … Is that right?”

Keep Emotions in Check

Although Newton is famous for stating, “for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction,” he was referring to objects, not people. Objects react, but people can chose not to. You can’t change your emotions, but you can decide how you want to act.

Separate People from the Problem

In every conflict there exists both the content of the problem and the human relationships. As a consequence, “people and the problem” often become entangled in discussions that sometimes lead to treating people and the problem as one.

Reframe

Reframing is a powerful method to reinterpret a state­ment or comment into a problem-solving frame. For example, if someone is yelling and screaming, don’t think of the person as being disrespectful and rude, but reframe your perception of that person as having limited skills in communication. (Easier said than done, right?) In addition, help the other person reframe the conflict into a problem by asking for their advice. For example, “What would you suggest I do?” “Knowing what my interests are, what would you do if you were in my shoes?” 

Conflict is just a part of our lives. Let’s work together to turn a little conflict into a lot of opportunity. For more information about leadership and community vitality, visit the Southwind Extension website at www.southwind.k-state.edu or find us on Facebook.


Carla Nemecek
Southwind Extension District
Director & Agent
cnemecek@ksu.edu
620-365-2242
1006 N. State, Iola, KS 66749

New COVID Special Enrollment Period for HealthCare.gov: February 15- May 15

Joy Miller, RD, LD
Family and Consumer Science Extension Agent
Adult Development and Aging
Family Resource Management
K-State Research and Extension
Southwind Extension District
210 S. National
Fort Scott, KS 66701
Office: 620-223-3720
Fax: 620-223-0332
joymiller@ksu.edu

 

People have a new chance to enroll in 2021 coverage on HealthCare.gov between February 15- May 15.

 

On January 28, 2021, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), the government agency that runs HealthCare.gov, determined that the COVID-19 emergency presents exceptional circumstances for people trying to access health insurance. The CMS opened a Special Enrollment Period (SEP) for people to enroll in the coverage they need. Here are a few quick tips and facts about this opportunity.

 

Who can enroll during the new COVID SEP? Any marketplace-eligible person can enroll during this SEP. This includes people who are uninsured, current marketplace enrollees who would like to change plans, and people who are currently enrolled in COBRA and would like to switch to marketplace coverage.

 

When will coverage start? A person has 30 days to select a plan after they submit their application. Coverage begins on the first day of the month after plan selection. For example, a person who selects a plan on February 28 will have coverage effective on March 1.

 

How long does someone have to enroll? The SEP lasts from February 15 to May 15, but regular SEPs will still be available after that. People can enroll in Medicaid or CHIP at any time.

 

What if a person is eligible for COBRA? A person may be eligible for a premium tax credit even if they are eligible for COBRA, but they can’t take both. If a person elected COBRA but changes their mind within the SEP window, they can enroll in marketplace coverage with a premium tax credit and disenroll from COBRA.

 

Financial subsidies such as ‘premium tax credit’ are available for households with income(s) between 100%-400% of the Federal Poverty Guideline and enrolled in a Marketplace plan. Understanding what counts as income is important for accuracy.

 

Do stimulus payments count as income? No. These payments do not count as income for Medicaid or premium tax credit eligibility.

 

Do unemployment benefits count as income? For premium tax credit eligibility, all unemployment benefits (both the state and supplemental federal benefits) count as income. However, for Medicaid and CHIP eligibility, the current $300 per week federal pandemic unemployment compensation is excluded from income, while other unemployment benefits do count.

 

Other types of income among people who have lost a job include withdrawing money from a retirement plan or IRA and social security benefits.

 

To learn more about Marketplace health insurance plans, eligibility, how to apply, and who can assist you, register for the Marketplace Health Insurance Webinar presented by me, Joy Miller, a certified Assister with the Marketplace. The Webinar will be offered at 12:30 p.m. and 6:00 p.m. March 3, April 7, and May 5. Register for free at www.bit.ly/SouthwindMarketplace. For more information, call 620-223-3720 or e-mail joymiller@ksu.edu.

 

 

Master of Memory Program to be Presented

Barbara Stockebrand. K-State Extension Agent. Submitted photo.

1Many people believe that memory loss and aging go hand-in-hand. That would assume that as a person gets older his or her memory begins to fail. While some change may be expected as you age, that doesn’t mean you can’t do something about it in the absence of a brain disease, such as Alzheimer’s Disease. You can be proactive in using some strategies and lifestyle adaptations.

Southwind Extension District Agent, Barbara Stockebrand, will be presenting a Texas A&M created workshop series on “Master of Memory” on March 4, 11, and 18 from 6:30 to 8:00 p.m. The 3-lesson series helps participants understand how memory works and what may affect memory. All sessions will be presented by Zoom, so it will be easy to attend and participate from the comforts of your home.

“Master of Memory” has been found to help participants identify and use strategies to improve memory function. Participants will learn there are different ways to learn new things and different memory strategies; how different foods and nutrients may affect brain function and medications that may affect memory; medical conditions that affect memory and may be reversible, along with how exercise benefits the body and mind.

Call 620-625-8620 to register for this free educational opportunity. Registration is necessary to receive the Zoom link to take part in the program.

K-State Research and Extension is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Understanding Seed Catalog Lingo

Krista Harding
District Extension Agent, Horticulture
Southwind Extension District
111 S. Butler
Erie, KS 66733
Office: 620-244-3826
Cell: 620-496-8786

 

Even though the calendar says that we are only half-way through winter, the seed catalogs are telling us spring is just around the corner by the number of mailings they are sending out. I think I have already received six or seven!

I thoroughly enjoy flipping through the catalogs and planning what new plants I want to try this year. I’m sure many of you do the exactly the same. But do you understand all of the terminology that you see in seed catalogs? A clear understanding of the lingo used in the catalogs is needed so that you can be the most successful with your plantings.

When shopping for perennials, you will encounter the term “hardiness zone”. The United States (lower 48) is broken up into 8 hardiness zones based upon the lowest average winter temperature for the area. Southeast Kansas is located in zone 6. Knowing what zone your garden is in and seeing what zone the plant is hardy to will help you pick plants that will survive the winter. However, keep in mind that your individual planting areas might include a “microclimate.” A microclimate is an area that the soil, moisture, humidity, heat, wind or other conditions affect the viability of individual plants. So think about your planting site before ordering.

If you are looking at tomatoes, you will probably see the words determinant and indeterminate. These words refer to how large the plants get and how they grow. Determinant types tend to stay more compact and bushy. These are best suited for a smaller garden. Indeterminate types tend to get tall and just keep getting taller over the summer. If you want a tall plant to impress your neighbor, this is the one!

Days to harvest” refers to the average number of days it usually takes after you set out transplants before you can expect your first harvest. This is highly variable and just because you count back the right number of days from the Fourth of July, doesn’t necessarily mean that you will have ripe tomatoes by then. I have a friend that ordered in an array of sunflower seeds last year in preparation for a September wedding. The “days to harvest” was supposed to be around 70-75 days. So, she counted back from the wedding date and planted accordingly. Unfortunately, they bloomed about day 52 thanks to high heat! It just goes to show us that Mother Nature always wins regardless of our planning.

Terms such as AAS (All American Selections) and Perennial Plant of the Year, indicate that those varieties have been trialed for many years in trial gardens through the United States and have been shown to be outstanding performers. They are often worthy of a place in the garden.

Looking for plants that have disease tolerance or disease resistance is good. But the two terms have different meanings. A plant listed as disease tolerant will probably get a disease common to the plant, but it may not be so bad that treatment is needed. The disease probably won’t affect the appearance much. Disease resistance means the plant has been bred to resist common disease problems and will probably not get the disease. One of the best examples of this is in roses. Some roses will be listed as disease resistant to black spot and then some will be listed as disease tolerant to black spot.

Seed catalogs can be somewhat overwhelming. But if you do your homework and know the lingo, you will be able to pick out the best suited plants for your garden.

If you have questions on variety selection as you browse through your catalogs, please contact me. I would be happy to visit with you.

Krista Harding is a K-State Research and Extension Agricultural agent assigned to Southwind District. She may be reached at kharding@ksu.edu or 620-244-3826.

K-State Research and Extension is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

A Solution to the Challenge of Leadership 

Carla Nemecek is Southwind District Director and agent.

 

Submitted by Carla Nemecek, Southwind Extension District

 

Funny story – I wrote this paragraph for my column in February of 2019 and apparently, I had no idea what was in my future, our future, only one year later!  “As we are all aware, we are living in a time of rapid change. There have always been changes taking place in our communities, but the different thing today seems to be the rate of change. It happens so fast that we sometimes feel we can hardly keep up. No doubt, with emerging community issues and school activities in full swing, I can relate to struggling to keep up with change.” 

I bring this to your attention because the Southwind Extension District is offering a way to help you navigate this constant change by offering a virtual Community Board Leadership Series. Whether you are elected, appointed, or even volunteered to serve or work with a team this series will help you learn the skills necessary to be successful.

The series will be offered on Tuesdays & Thursdays, February 16, 18, 23 and 25 from Noon to 1:00 pm. Workshop participants will meet virtually and upon registration will receive a link to participate in the live, web-based discussion. Sessions will include Organizing/Leading Effective Meetings, Generations & Behavioral Management, Understanding Fellow Board Members and Conflict Management, and then we will wrap up with Strategic Planning to learn more about establishing a common mission and vision for the board, and how to plan priorities for the future.

We are all busy – and some days in can be overwhelming. Personally, I admit that thinking about all of my personal and professional obligations can be downright stressful. This time of the year, many organizations are reorganizing and looking for volunteer leaders. Regardless of your age, I challenge you to consider your leadership role within your community and look for avenues to serve. It may be through an after-school program, 4-H project leader, local government, or even in your church.

Pre-registration for the event is required by February 12, 2021. The cost of $20 covers for all four sessions for one board member.  Each registration buys a seat, which can be rotated by participants.  Registration also includes a copy of the meeting materials that will be mailed prior to the workshop. Registration is available at www.bit.ly/BoardLeadership2021 or by going to www.southwind.k-state.edu. If you have questions or would prefer to register by phone, please contact Carla Nemecek at the Southwind Extension District, 620-365-2242.


Carla Nemecek
Southwind Extension District
Director & Agent
cnemecek@ksu.edu
620-365-2242
1 North Washington, Iola, KS 66749

Are You the One in Ten?

Joy Miller, RD, LD
Family and Consumer Science Extension Agent
Adult Development and Aging
Family Resource Management
K-State Research and Extension
Southwind Extension District
210 S. National
Fort Scott, KS 66701
Office: 620-223-3720
Fax: 620-223-0332
joymiller@ksu.edu

 

Dining with Diabetes program to help cut diabetes risks

 

Imagine a gathering with 10 of your friends and family members. Now imagine that at least one of you has a disease that can lead to blindness…or amputation…or a stroke. The prospect is not at all far-fetched.

About one in 10 Kansans has been diagnosed with diabetes, a chronic disease characterized by elevated blood sugar (blood glucose). High levels of blood glucose are a result of inadequate production of insulin or a resistance to the effects of insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas.

Diabetes increases the risk of stroke, heart disease, kidney disease, or retinopathy that can cause blindness and neuropathy leading to lower limb amputation.

The vast majority of adults who are diagnosed with diabetes – 90 to 95 percent – have Type 2 diabetes which occurs when cells in the body become resistant to the effects of insulin. Prediabetes is a condition in which the blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be diagnosed as type 2 diabetes. Unlike Type 1, which occurs when the body cannot produce insulin and cannot be prevented, the onset of Type 2 can be prevented.

Risk factors for prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes include being overweight, age 45 or older, and low levels of physical activity (less than three times per week). Other risk factors include having a family member (parent, brother, or sister) with type 2 diabetes, or having gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy). To a small degree, race, ethnicity, and gender contribute to overall risk, too.

Some risk factors cannot be changed such as age and family history, but others can be modified. This includes managing your weight, being active, eat healthier, and if you smoke, quit. A quick assessment of your risk can be done at the American Diabetes Association website www.diabetes.org/dibetes-risk/tools-know-your-risk, takes less than a minute,.

Adults with type 2 diabetes, prediabetes, and their family members, caregivers, and support persons may be interested in K-State Research and Extension Dining with Diabetes online course beginning March 1. Individuals will learn strategies to manage diabetes through menu planning, carbohydrate counting, portion control, and label reading. The five week course is self-paced and participants can choose the level of interaction with the instructor and other participants.

Cost is $25, class size limited, and registration required by February 18th at southwind.ksu.edu/events. For more information or questions, contact Joy Miller at 620-223-3720 or e-mail joymiller@ksu.edu.

Starlite FCE Minutes of Jan. 21

The January meeting of Starlite FCE was held on January 21st at the Yeager building at the Fairgrounds.  President Glenda Miller called the meeting to order and Joyce Allen led the members in reciting the Pledge of Allegiance and the Club Collect.  Eleven members and one guest were in attendance.  The members reported seven hours of volunteer work and that they had recycled three hundred and eighty pounds of paper.  The minutes of the previous meeting were read and approved.

 

Doris Ericson presented the Treasurer’ report and reminded us to bring in our Best Choice labels.   Glenda Miller reported that the County Council had cancelled the Spring Tea for this year due to Covid.  She also went over the information presented in the FCE newsletter.

 

Old business consisted of the Valentines for the Tri-Valley clients.  Cards were signed by members and placed in treat bags.  Letha Johnson moved that the person in charge of event be given authority to purchase items for said event and receive reimbursement out of the club account.  Del Parks seconded the motion, motion carried.

 

It was announced that Lois Williams a longtime previous member had passed as well as Del Parks brother.  Megan Brillhart announced that Presbyterian Village residents have received their first round of Covid shots and that they should be able to start getting out in about six weeks.

 

Glenda Miller presented members with unity valentines and a trivia quiz on Kansas in celebration of Kansas Day January 29th.

 

Joy Miller presented the lesson to the club of “Taking a new look at Fermented Foods.”  Fermented foods include sauerkraut, wine, kimchi, sour dough bread and yogurt, to name a few.  Joy also passed out troubleshooting guide on fermentation, Information about the upcoming Aging with Attitude Regional expo and Dining with Diabetes online classes.

 

Deb Lust moved that the meeting be adjourned, Jackie Warren seconded the motion, meeting adjourned.  After the meeting the members enjoyed cupcakes, cookies, M&M and water provided by Jackie Warren and Deb Woods.

 

Prepared by

Terri Williams

Board Leadership Series Planned for February 

Carla Nemecek is Southwind District Director and agent.

 

K-State Research and Extension is conducting a series of virtual Board Leadership workshops across the Southwind District February 16, 18, 23 & 25.

Designed to provide basic training for members of community-based boards, the series will be hosted by local Extension professionals from the Southwind and Wildcat Extension Districts, and participants are invited to join from any remote location of their choice.

Informed and committed board members are the key to healthy, effective boards and committees in our Kansas communities.  K-State Research and Extension’s Board Leadership Series will provide an opportunity for board members to learn the basics of being a good board member.  Whether you are a member of a church board, a township board, a United Way agency board, or a rural water board, this training is appropriate for you.

The series will kick-off on February 16 with Organizing/Leading Effective Meetings.  During this session, participants will learn about their roles and responsibilities as a board member, basics of parliamentary procedure, and strategies to make meetings more productive and effective.

On February 18, the topic will be Generations & Behavioral Management. This session will explore how personalities and generational differences affect the decision-making process.

 

The February 23 session will cover Understanding Fellow Board Members and Conflict Management. Participants will learn how to manage conflict in a way that is productive, not destructive, to the board.

 

Strategic Planning will be the final topic on February 25.  Participants will learn about establishing a common mission and vision for the board, and how to plan priorities for the future.

 

All sessions will be conducted from Noon to 1:00 pm. Workshop participants will meet virtually and upon registration will receive a link to participate in the live, web-based discussion.

 

Pre-registration for the event is required by February 12, 2021. The cost of $20 covers for all four sessions for one board member.  Each registration buys a seat, which can be rotated by participants.  Registration also includes a copy of the meeting materials that will be mailed prior to the workshop. Registration is available at www.bit.ly/BoardLeadership2021 or by going to www.southwind.k-state.edu. If you have questions or would prefer to register by phone, please contact Carla Nemecek at the Southwind Extension District, 620-365-2242.

 

Carla Nemecek
Southwind Extension District
Director & Agent
cnemecek@ksu.edu
620-365-2242
1 North Washington, Iola, KS 66749

New Vegetables and Flowers to Try in 2021

Krista Harding
District Extension Agent, Horticulture
Southwind Extension District
111 S. Butler
Erie, KS 66733
Office: 620-244-3826
Cell: 620-496-8786

 

Each year, the All-America Selections (AAS) tests and introduces new flowers and vegetables to home gardeners. These plants have proven themselves to do well in trials across North America. The AAS winner label is like a stamp of approval. This year, there were three vegetables winners and three flower winners.

The descriptions were taken from All-America Selections material.

Pepper Pot-a-peno F1 – this is a fun new jalapeno pepper with a compact habit perfect for growing in containers or hanging baskets. The plentiful small, green jalapeno fruits have a traditional spicy zip that is great in any dish where you want a little punch of spice. It is earlier to mature than other jalapenos giving a head start on the garden harvest. A unique trait of Pot-a-peno is how the fruit hangs down beneath the plant making it very easy to harvest without damaging the appearance or productivity of the plant. In addition, the dense foliage canopy makes for an attractive addition to the patio.

Squash Goldilocks F1 – in the trials, this was a vigorous plant with high yield, disease tolerance, and a rich nutty flavor. With its bright orange color and uniform shape, it can also double as an ornamental decoration.

Echalion Crème Brulee (BGS-270) F1 – this is the first ever shallot to win the AAS. The single-centered bulbs have a bright coppery pink outer skin and a pretty rosy-purple interior with thick rings. The sweet tender bulbs are earlier to mature than the comparisons and have a slight citrusy flavor when eaten raw. This is a fantastic variety for the home gardener as well as fresh market growers.

Celosia Kelos® Candela Pink – an AAS judge described this entry as the “Energizer Bunny” that just kept blooming! Judges loved the bright pink blooms that rose above the foliage, almost like a tall, tapered candle. Unique, showy plumes of pink flowers kept their color all season long and the judges agreed that it was a perfect filler plant to add height and interest to a combination container planting. However, it could also be useful in mass plantings, borders, and general garden use. Another added bonus: it works well as a dried flower.

Leucanthemum Sweet Daisy Birdy – a beautiful perennial with robust, long-lasting blooms and carefree longevity in gardens. In the trials, it demonstrated excellent cold and heat tolerance and maintained a tidy, sturdy habit over the three-year trial. The flowers are large and pure white in color, appearing earlier in the season than the comparison varieties. Leucanthemums, also known as Shasta Daisies, are used for both cut flowers and garden highlights while also providing food and habitat for many kinds of pollinators.

Zinnia Profusion Red Yellow Bicolor – a beautiful new bicolor addition to the popular Profusion series of zinnias. This gorgeous zinnia starts the season with a bold vibrant red center ring surrounded by golden yellow outer petals. As the season progresses, the aging flowers morph into soft, beautiful shades of apricot, salmon, and dusty rose. This zinnia continued to bloom new flowers over old so there was never a decline in the beauty presented.

For full details of the 2021 All America Selection winners, including descriptions and ordering information, visit www.all-americaselections.org

Krista Harding is a K-State Research and Extension Agricultural agent assigned to Southwind District. She may be reached at kharding@ksu.edu or by calling 620-244-3826.

K-State Research and Extension is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

k-State Extension Resources Available 

Submitted by: Carla Nemecek, Southwind Extension District, Director & Agent

 

Kansas State University provides you with research-based information through many avenues. Locally, your contact is the Southwind Extension District in Erie, Ft. Scott, Yates Center and Iola. Hundreds of publications and fact sheets, written by K-State researchers and specialists, are available through the university’s Publications Library, www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/ Another alternative is to research the information provided on the Southwind website, www.southwind.k-state.edu/  In 2021, we are working toward making more information and resources available to you in a digital format – but that initiative is a work in progress!

 

Not all of our services can be found on the internet. One of the most utilized resources is soil testing. K-State Research & Extension can test soil for $13 per sample or $11 apiece for two or more. Soil testing is recommended for gardeners, farmers, testing for lawn & turf problems, or pasture management. Feed and forage testing is also offered. The only way to know for certain the quality of the feed is to get a lab analysis of it, to take a forage test. A forage test may run from $12-24 per sample, depending on what you want the sample tested for. Other tests that are available include Radon Test Kits ($7) and Water Quality Testing resources.

 

The 2021 Chemical Weed Control Guide arrived in our offices last week and provides suggestions for chemical weed control in most major row crops and pastures. It offers recommendations, and guidelines for crop specific chemicals to ensure you are using the best product for the situation.

 

This time of the year, we sell quite a few Farm and Family Account Books ($4.50 – $8.50). If you haven’t made the transition to computerized record keeping, this resource allows for an accurate accounting of your finances in a form that makes completing taxes easier.

 

Have you ever wondered what that unidentified pest or plant lurking around your home may be, or even how you can get rid of it? The Extension Office has expertise and resources available to identify pests that are common to our area and in Kansas. This includes home and crop insects, weeds, and various plants. We can also provide information on how to remove or control the pest, depending on your situation.

 

One of our “best kept secret” products that we offer for sale are odor neutralizers.  Ecosorb ($28) is used in numerous homes, farm and industrial/commercial applications. Most of our clients seek this product to control the odor from fuel spills, mold smell, or skunk sprays.  Neutroleum Alpha ($38) is a concentrated product utilized in a similar fashion to control strong odors. Because it is a concentrate, it can be used in a larger area.

 

Extension publications are very accessible to the public, and most are free if you pick them up in the Extension Office. The Kansas Garden Guide is a popular publication that is available for only $6. If you are looking for resources on planning a garden, seeding & planting, or details about a specific crop, this publication is a must-have.  Extension offers many, many publications on home gardening so please stop by if you are looking for something specific.

 

Area farmers and ranchers often utilize the Kansas Performance Tests for various crops to determine which varieties will grow best in this area of the state. Next month, the 2021 Hybrid Reports for Corn, Soybeans, and Grain Sorghum will become available in the Extension Office. This is in addition to the Wheat Seed Book that is always available in late summer after wheat has been harvested and data collected.

 

As a consumer, you have many options for finding the answers to your questions. By choosing to use the Extension Service, you can be sure you are getting research-based, unbiased information. We encourage you to use the Southwind Extension District Offices in Erie, Ft. Scott, Yates Center and Iola to help answer your questions. For the latest information, please like our Facebook page, ‘Southwind Extension District’ or you can find us on the web, www.southwind.k-state.edu/

Carla Nemecek
Southwind Extension District
Director & Agent
cnemecek@ksu.edu
620-365-2242
1 North Washington, Iola, KS 66749