Category Archives: Bourbon County

Bourbon County COVID-19 Update

SEK Multi-County Health Departments

Allen, Anderson, Bourbon, and Woodson Counties

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update

August 10, 2020

” Bourbon County has received a number of presumptive cases lately,” Rebecca Johnson, the administrator said.  “I have changed current positive cases to current active cases, so the active case count is understood.”

 

 

 

Allen County

Current Active Cases 8
Positive Out of State-Staying in Allen County 2
Total Hospitalizations 2-1 remaining in hospital
Current Recovered Cases 13
Total Positives Since Testing 20
Deaths 0

Anderson County

Current Active Cases 2
Total Hospitalizations 0
Current Recovered Cases 29
Total Positives Since Testing 31
Deaths 0

Bourbon County

Current Active Cases 11
Presumptive Cases 13-1 listed on KDHE website, tested negative
Positive Out of State/County-staying in Bourbon 11
Total Hospitalizations 8-0 remaining in hospital
Current Recovered Cases 79-includes presumptive cases
Total Positives Since Testing 79
Deaths 2

Woodson County

Current Active Cases 1
Total Hospitalizations 1-0 remaining in hospital
Current Recovered Cases 11
Total Positives Since Testing 12
Deaths 0

Second COVID-19 Positive at Presbyterian Village

Second Fort Scott Presbyterian Village
employee tests COVID-19 positive

FORT SCOTT, Ks. – A second Fort Scott Presbyterian Village non-direct resident care employee tested positive for COVID-19 in testing conducted at the campus last week. Seven employees and two residents were tested after being identified as close contacts of an employee who tested positive August 1. The seven employees have been in quarantine at home and the two residents have been in isolation at the campus.

Six employees and the two residents tested negative. One non-direct resident care employee tested positive. No residents or employees, including the employee who tested positive, are showing signs or symptoms of COVID-19 at this time.

The Bourbon County Health Department and the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Epidemiology Hotline have been notified. At this time, the health department is not recommending any additional testing because the positive employee has been in quarantine since August 1.

Our top priority continues to be the safety of our residents and staff members,” said Jeanne Gerstenkorn, PMMA’s infection preventionist and vice president for health and wellness.

Families were been called August 7 to alert them to the positive case, and all state and county mandatory required reporting agencies have been notified.

All employees are encouraged to follow CDC guidelines and best practices as these are continually updated. The community regularly reinforces with all staff that an employee should not report to work if he or she is experiencing symptoms of a respiratory illness or are not feeling well.

The employee is quarantined and will not be allowed to work until they meet CDC and KDHE guidelines for when an employee may return to work. Under the current guidelines, symptomatic employees may return to work when at least 72 hours have passed since resolution of the employee’s fever without the use of fever-reducing medications and the employee’s symptoms have improved and at least 10 days have passed since symptoms first appeared. Asymptomatic positive employees will quarantine for 14 days. Upon the employee’s return to work, we will follow CDC recommendations related to work practices and restrictions.

For more information about Fort Scott Presbyterian Village’s response, go to PMMA’s (Presbyterian Manors of Mid-America’s) website, Presbyterianmanors.org/Media- room.

 

American Wind Week

Kansas Launches American Wind Week,
Hosts Virtual Panel with State, Business and Industry Leaders
The week’s activities will highlight Kansas’ position as a leader in wind energy development, opportunities for the state’s workforce, and the many ways wind is building the future.
Topeka, KS – This week marks American Wind Week, an annual celebration of wind energy’s leading role in powering our country and the many ways wind is helping build the future. This year, Boost Kansas and its supporters have plenty to celebrate as wind is now America’s number one source of renewable energy.
According to the American Wind Energy Association, wind power has created good-paying jobs for over 120,000 Americans across all 50 states, including more than 26,000 jobs at more than 530 U.S. factories that build wind turbine parts. Wind energy is a drought and flood proof “cash crop” for America’s family farmers and ranchers, paying over $1.6 billion dollars a year in lease payments and revenue for state and local governments, while avoiding carbon pollution equivalent to 42 million cars. The nation has a vast resource to harvest through both onshore and offshore wind energy development, with a power potential that is nearly double the nation’s electricity use.
Right here in Kansas, Governor Kelly issued a proclamation announcing this week as American Wind Week, along with 4 cities and counties. In Kansas, wind now supports 6,000 jobs, $36 million in annual land lease payments, and provides $29 million in revenue for state and local governments, leading to new community facilities such as schools and courthouses, improving roads and bridges, and upgrading emergency services. More than $11.4 billion in capital financing has been invested in the state, providing unparalleled opportunities for workforce expansion and economic growth as a result of wind energy.
Throughout the week, Boost Kansas will be sharing the stories of communities that are benefiting from wind energy. These stories are now available including two notable examples from Ford and Pratt Counties.
On Monday, August 10 at 10:30-11:00 AM CT, Apex Clean Energy will host a virtual tour of a wind farm and wind turbine climb to highlight the wind energy workers on the frontlines helping keep the lights on every day and ensuring that Americans have access to cheap, clean electricity. Join us at the following link to watch live!
Boost Kansas is also excited to announce that we’ll be holding a virtual event that will give Kansans an opportunity to hear more about the successes of wind energy in their own state:
WHAT
A virtual panel discussion with state, business, and industry leaders highlighting Kansas’ position as a leader in wind energy development, the economic and workforce opportunities wind brings to the state, and the many ways the energy source is building the future.
WHO
  • State Senator Elaine Bowers
  • Randi Tveitaraas Jack, Manager of International Development, Department of Commerce
  • Joann Knight, Executive Director, Dodge City/Ford County Development Corporation
  • APEX Clean Energy
  • Enel Group
Moderator: Riley Scott, Boost Kansas
WHEN
Thursday, August 13, 2020
3:00 PM CT
RSVP
To set up an interview with a panelist during American Wind Week, please contact Jesse Dougherty at jdougherty@strategicelements.com or (608) 807-8619.
Boost Kansas will be sharing highlights and other content onFacebook and Twitter. Follow along and join in the conversation by using #AmericanWindWeek and #WindBuildsTheFuture.
###
About Boost Kansas
Boost Kansas, an initiative of the American Wind Energy Association, is a statewide coalition of civic and business leaders supporting innovative policies that expand renewable and wind energy investment in the state. With commonsense federal and state policies, Kansas can continue to be a national leader in harnessing the power of wind and renewable energy development. Learn more at BoostKansas.com.
About the American Wind Energy Association
AWEA is the national trade association for the U.S. wind industry, the largest source of renewable energy in the country. We represent 1,000 member companies, 120,000 jobs in the U.S. economy, and a nationwide workforce located across all 50 states. AWEA serves as a powerful voice for how wind works for America. Members include global leaders in wind power and energy development, turbine manufacturing, and component and service suppliers. They gather each year at the Western Hemisphere’s most efficient and targeted event for utility-scale renewable companies, the AWEA CLEANPOWER Conference & Exhibition, next in Indianapolis, June 7-10, 2021. An outgrowth of the AWEA WINDPOWER Conference & Exhibition, CLEANPOWER is the first trade show focused exclusively on the utility-scale renewable power sector, bringing together all the major developers, utilities, OEMs, suppliers, and buyers under one roof. Visit AWEA’s website to learn more about the enormous economic benefits wind power brings to America and be sure to follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.

Now is the Perfect Time to Plant Fall Vegetables

Krista Harding
District Extension Agent, Horticulture
Southwind Extension District
111 S. Butler
Erie, KS 66733
Office: 620-244-3826
Cell: 620-496-8786

 

I realize we just turned the calendar to August, and although our summer gardens are still going strong, it is time to start thinking about getting our fall vegetables planted. Believe it or not, fall is a great gardening season!

When you think about it, fall weather is much like spring – warm daytime temperatures and cool nights. Rainfall is typically more abundant in the fall than summer so less irrigation is needed and fall gardens often have fewer insect pest and disease problems. Combine all of these and you have the ingredients for a great garden! And of most importance is the taste of the produce grown. Flavors of fall grown vegetables are often sweeter and milder in taste than those grown during hot summer weather.

Some of the best vegetables for a fall garden are lettuce, spinach, radishes, beets, cabbage, turnips and carrots because of their frost-tolerance. These vegetables can be planted directly into your garden wherever space can be found – next to plants still growing in the garden like tomatoes, cucumbers and pumpkins. Plant mid-August until the first week of September.

Left over seed from spring planting can be used as long as it was stored in a cool, dry location. To speed up germination and seedling emergence, soak the seeds overnight before planting. If you are purchasing new seed, look for the shortest season cultivars that you can find to insure harvest before a killing frost. The average fall freeze date for our area is around October 24 according to the Weather Data Library on the K-State campus.

Sometimes establishing a fall garden can be difficult during the summer when soil temperatures are extremely high. One way to avoid this is to establish plants in containers or pots for transplanting into the garden later in the season when the weather begins to cool. Cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, and collards can be grown in cooler protected areas for 2-4 weeks prior to setting in the garden. Be sure to acclimatize crops for several days before transplanting directly into the garden.

Garden soil should be prepared just like for spring. An application of fertilizer will probably be necessary for optimum plant growth. Use one pound of a complete analysis fertilizer, such as 12-12-12, applied per 100 square feet of garden area. Weeds and grasses will also grow well in a fall garden so mulching may be warranted.

If you do not have a traditional garden space, think about doing a container garden. Just about anything that will hold soil and have a drain hole in the bottom can be used.

Everyone gets geared up to plant vegetables in the spring, but the fall season offers many benefits to gardening. Few take advantage of the season, but consider giving it a try this year.

The Extension office has the “Vegetable Garden Planting Guide” publication available free of charge. This guide offers information such as days to first harvest, days to germination, planting depth, frost resistance, and more.

Krista Harding is a K-State Research and Extension Agricultural agent assigned to Southwind District. She may be reached at kharding@ksu.edu or 620-244-3826.

K-State Research and Extension is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Bourbon County Commission Agenda for Aug. 10

Agenda

Bourbon County Commission Room

1st Floor, County Courthouse

210 S. National Avenue

Fort Scott, KS 66701

Tuesdays starting at 9:00

Date: August 11, 2020

1st District-Lynne Oharah Minutes: Approved: _______________

2nd District-Jeff Fischer Corrected: _______________

3rd District-Nick Ruhl Adjourned at: _______________

County Clerk-Kendell Mason

MEETING WILL BE HELD IN COMMISSION ROOM. ANYONE ATTENDING THE MEETING WILL BE REQUIRED TO WEAR A MASK PROVIDED BY THE COUNTY. MUST MAINTAIN SOCIAL DISTANCING.

9:00 – 12:00 Spark Findings & Greenbush

1:30 – until end of day 2021 Budget Review

Bo Co Commission Agenda for Aug. 7

Agenda

Bourbon County Commission Room

1st Floor, County Courthouse

210 S. National Avenue

Fort Scott, KS 66701

Tuesdays starting at 9:00

Date: August 7, 2020

1st District-Lynne Oharah Minutes: Approved: _______________

2nd District-Jeff Fischer Corrected: _______________

3rd District-Nick Ruhl Adjourned at: _______________

County Clerk-Kendell Mason

MEETING WILL BE HELD IN COMMISSION ROOM. ANYONE ATTENDING THE MEETING WILL BE REQUIRED TO WEAR A MASK PROVIDED BY THE COUNTY. MUST MAINTAIN SOCIAL DISTANCING.

9:00 – 12:00 2021 Budget Meeting

12:00 – 1:00 Lunch

1:00 – 1:45 Greenbush, Spark Grant

1:45 – 2:00 Jody Hoener, BCBS Grant

2:00 – 2:10 Nancy Van Etten, Sewer District Board & Sewer Service Agreement

2:15 – 2:25 Harold Martin, Sewer District

2:30 – 2:40 Richard Clark, Road Construction 190th

2:45 – 2:50 Lora Holdridge, Back Parking/Judson

Bourbon County Records Second Death Due to COVID-19

SEK Multi-County Health Departments

Bourbon County, Kansas

PRESS RELEASE:

NOVEL CORONAVIRUS/COVID-19

August 5, 2020

It is with our deepest regret that we need to announce the loss of a resident of Bourbon County, KS (elderly female), due to COVID-19. We would like to extend our sympathy to the family and friends of this individual during this difficult time and encourage the public to do the same as her family and friends mourn her loss.

The individual had been hospitalized and the contact investigations have been completed. If you have not been contacted, your risk of exposure from this individual is minimal.

The overwhelming opinion of medical professionals across the country is that we MUST all do our part to help reduce the spread of this virus. Even though many will only experience mild symptoms, the higher risk/elderly population and those with underlying health issues could experience more severe symptoms.

In an effort to reduce the spread of COVID-19, it is recommended that everyone stay home if you are ill, utilize social distancing, use frequent hand hygiene, cough or sneeze into your sleeve/elbow, wear a mask when applicable, and disinfect highly touched surfaces.

If you feel you are exhibiting COVID-19 symptoms (fever, cough, shortness of breath) please call your clinic first. If you are experiencing life threatening symptoms, please call 911!

If you have questions, the Bourbon County Health Department will answer your call at (620)223-4464. Due to the volume of calls, we are not answering messages via Facebook or Messenger.

You can also visit Southeast Kansas Multi-County Health Departments on Facebook for local updates regarding COVID-19 or our website www.sekmchd.com.

We appreciate everyone’s efforts to decrease the spread of COVID-19. Please continue this effort.

Unofficial 2020 Primary Election Results For Bourbon County

Voters took advantage of advance voting Monday morning at the Bourbon County Clerk’s Office.

Submitted by the Bourbon County Clerks office:

2020 PRIMARY ELECTION UNOFFICIAL RESULTS
BOURBON COUNTY, KANSAS
AUGUST 4, 2020

Editor’s note: the clerk does not list the winners in each position for both the Republicans and Democrats together.

Republicans:

United States Senate
Vote for One 1
Lance Berland . . . . . . . . . 41 1
John L. Berman. . . . . . . . . 10
Derek C. Ellis. . . . . . . . . 31 1
Bob Hamilton . . . . . . . . . 579
Kris Kobach. . . . . . . . . . 1,029
David Alan Lindstrom. . . . . . . 85
Roger Marshall. . . . . . . . . 537
Brian Matlock . . . . . . . . . 38
John Miller. . . . . . . . . . 41
Steve Roberts . . . . . . . . . 101
Gabriel Mark Robles . . . . . . . 10

United States House of Representative
Vote for One 1
Jake LaTurner . . . . . . . . . 1,256
Dennis Taylor . . . . . . . . . 283
Steve Watkins . . . . . . . . . 948

Kansas Senate, 13th District DISTRICT 13
Vote for One 1
Richard Hilderbrand . . . . . . . 1,451

Kansas Senate, 12th District DISTRICT 12
Vote for One 1
Caryn Tyson. . . . . . . . . . 819

Kansas House of Representatives, 2nd DISTRICT 2
Vote for One 1
Kenneth Collins . . . . . . . . 202

Kansas House of Representatives, 4th DISTRICT 4
Vote for One 1
Arlyn Briggs . . . . . . . . . 205
Trevor Jacobs . . . . . . . . . 2,030

County Commissioner DISTRICT 3
Vote for One 1
Clifton Beth . . . . . . . . . 296
Joshua Jackson. . . . . . . . . 98
LeRoy “Nick” Ruhl. . . . . . . . 172

County Commissioner DISTRICT 2
Vote for One 1
Jeffrey Fischer . . . . . . . . 282
Jim Harris . . . . . . . . . . 466
Sparky (Don) Schroeder . . . . . . 445

County Clerk
Vote for One 1
Nick Graham. . . . . . . . . . 695
Kendell Dawn Mason . . . . . . . 1,148
Bobby “Bob” Reed . . . . . . . . 685

County Treasurer
Vote for One 1
Patty Love . . . . . . . . . . 1,467
Mike Mason . . . . . . . . . . 497
Shaunn Pytlowany . . . . . . . . 559

County Register of Deeds
Vote for One 1
Lora Holdridge. . . . . . . . . 2,286

County Attorney
Vote for One 1
Jacqie Spradling . . . . . . . . 2,154

County Sheriff
Vote for One 1
Derick Burke . . . . . . . . . 1,095
Bill Martin. . . . . . . . . . 1,318
Craig A. Rice . . . . . . . . . 172

 

Democrats:

 

United States Senate
Vote for One 1
Barbara Bollier . . . . . . . . 391
Robert Leon Tillman . . . . . . . 224

United States House of Representativ
Vote for One 1
Michelle De La Isla . . . . . . . 387
James K. Windholz. . . . . . . . 217

Kansas Senate, 13th District DISTRICT 13
Vote for One 1
Nancy J. Ingle. . . . . . . . . 352

Kansas Senate, 12th District DISTRICT 12
Vote for One 1
Mike Bruner. . . . . . . . . . 138

Kansas House of Representatives, 2nd DISTRICT 2
Vote for One 1
Lynn D. Grant . . . . . . . . . 23

Kansas House of Representatives, 4th DISTRICT 4
Vote for One 1
Bill Meyer . . . . . . . . . . 563

County Commissioner DISTRICT 3
Vote for One 1
Phillip G. Hoyt . . . . . . . . 171

County Commissioner DISTRICT 2
Vote for One 1
WRITE-IN. . . . . . . . . . . 19

County Clerk
Vote for One 1
WRITE-IN. . . . . . . . . . . 61

County Treasurer
Vote for One 1
WRITE-IN. . . . . . . . . . . 52

County Register of Deeds
Vote for One 1
WRITE-IN. . . . . . . . . . . 22

County Attorney
Vote for One 1
WRITE-IN. . . . . . . . . . . 23

County Sheriff
Vote for One 1
Mike Feagins . . . . . . . . . 397
Julie Saker. . . . . . . . . . 178

BoCo Commission Minutes of July 24

July 24, 2020

The Bourbon County Commission met in open session for a Spark grant meeting with Commissioners Oharah and Fischer present, the County Clerk was also present.

Also present for the Spark meeting were Economic Development DirectorJody Hoener, FSCC President Alicia Johnston, Hazel Swarts, Emergency Manger William Wallis and Greenbush representatives Monica Murnon, Mike, and Dawn Floris.

Bourbon County is receiving $2.9 million for disbursement for COVID-19 related expenses and direct aid.

Treasurer Patty Love met with the Commissioners regarding the bank account for the Spark grant funds, she said that Terry Sercer told her to deposit the money in a separate non-interest baring bank account. Lynne made a motion to deposit the money in a non-interest baring account, Jeff seconded and the motion passed and the Commissioners and Kendell signed the banking paper work.

Jody Hoener said the Spark steering committee will be comprised of the following… Craig Campbell (Mercy Hospital), Jesse Ervin (City of Uniontown), Jerry Witt & Bill Michaud (business owner in Fort Scott, Susan Bancroft (City of Fort Scott) and Ted Hessong (USD234).

Monica said that currently Bourbon County is in the reporting and compliance portion of the grant. She said the County could use the County prioritization roadmap as a framework to plan and prioritize their investments and it is as follows… making public institutions whole, protecting the health of Kansas, revitalizing local businesses and building resilient communities. Normally you specify what the funds will be used for when applying for a grant, but this grant was given to the Counties in Kansas and the County then has to specify where the money will be used. There are two different pillars for the use for the use of the funds: reimbursement and direct aid.

Alicia Johnston said that FSCC needed money for the following areas: distance learning, improvements for telework capabilities, payroll specific to mitigating the COVID-19 response, reopening measurers, technology costs and transportation costs. She said that Mercy hospital is allowing FSCC to use 30 patient rooms to house students in.

Jeff made a motion to accept the 1st round of reimbursement of expenses, (administration fees, FSCC=$308,717.00, the City of Uniontown=$225.33, the City of Fort Scott=$20,000.00 and the City of Bronson=$100.00), Lynne seconded and the motion passed.

Jeff made a motion to accept the steering committees recommendations for spending the remaining money (Economic Development=$490,049.64, Small Business/Non Profit Grant Program=$122,512.41, Health=$735,074.47, Education=$490,049.64 and Collaborative Projects=$612,562.06), Lynne seconded and the motion passed.

Monica discussed the different draft survey application processes for the reimbursement portion and the direct aid portion. She said the application will be live on 07/28/2020. She said business that were mandated to close due to COVID-19 or chose to close (if approved for the grant) could use the funds for operational costs. Jeff made a motion to accept the survey processes, (this is currently in draft form and changes could be made to the process), Lynne seconded and all approved.

Hazel Swarts questioned what Greenbush’s role was in the grant; Lynne said they had been hired to administer the grant, he said the Commissioners wanted to keep the administration process local and that the Commissioners had voted to sign the contracts with Greenbush. The contract amount is $69,900, (unless they do anything beyond the scope of services).

Any questions regarding the Spark grant funds or the application process should contact Greenbush at (620)249-7149.

Lynne made a motion to have a budget worksession and a Spark grant meeting on August 7th at 1:00 pm, Jeff seconded and the motion passed.

At 3:17, Lynne made a motion to adjourn, Jeff seconded, meeting adjourned.

THE BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS
OF BOURBON COUNTY, KANSAS
(ss) Lynne Oharah, Chairman
(ss) Jeff Fischer, Commissioner
(ss) Nick Ruhl, Commissioner
ATTEST:
Kendell Mason, Bourbon County Clerk
July 28, 2020, Approved Date

Ad: Jeff Fischer For Bourbon County Commission

I am thankful for your support over the past four years in our service to the community. I consider it a tremendous privilege to have your trust and hope that this trust is still valued. I humbly request the favor of your continued support for me in my quest for a second term as your County Commissioner.

Four years ago, my promises to you were:

  1. To complete the Bourbon County Law Enforcement Center construction contract on time and within budget, leveraging my skills as a professional engineer. This construction contract was valued at 6.8 million and was executed without any significant change orders.
  2. To benchmark our county’s financial performance with like-sized Kansas counties. These comparisons helped in budgeting, compensation and forecasting.
  3. To improve accountability and transparency, specifically with the Garland Fire Department. That Department is once again performing to the satisfaction of its constituents.

The biggest challenges over this term were the restructuring of healthcare, the wind turbines, and the pandemic. Healthcare is 17.5% of our economy and our community was facing the realization that our hospital was closing. Fortunately, our county commission worked with Mercy and two key providers were recruited to ensure continuity of care. The anticipated decline of property values did not occur.

Mercy donated an ambulance service to Bourbon County to provide this service. After comparing several nearby county models’ organizational structure for ambulance service, we ultimately patterned ours like the Allen County model. Bourbon county contracts with Fort Scott for $1,020,000 annually for operating this service and the county collects the fees. We were able to keep this service local for about half the cost to taxpayers in comparison to our northern neighbor, Linn County.

Civic leader Bill Brittan approached the county commission with the concept of a Healthcare Mall. He believed that with three anchor tenants, this property would be a viable, self-sustaining community resource that could attract medical professionals, students, and patients into our community. Two of the anchors appeared to be already in place, those being Community Health Centers of South East Kansas and Ascension Via Christi. The county commission felt that another anchor tenant was needed to make this sustainable.

Last September, Nathan Fawson of the Southeast Kansas Mental Health Center requested a tour of the Mercy Hospital building. Since that time, the concept of a regional behavioral crisis center has been explored and pitched in Topeka. Preliminary discussions with State and Federal behavioral health providers were initiated, linking these services with FSCC’s Nursing Program. Unfortunately, the pandemic has hampered the development of these proposals into letters of intent.

I have learned a great deal as we engaged the prospect of wind turbines in our county. I regret that this issue was so divisive, pitting neighbor against neighbor. I also carry remorse for some of my own off-the-cuff conduct during our commission meetings. I’ve learned that Truth is a precious commodity and that Trust must be earned.

Looking ahead, there are serious challenges that we face as a county. Our tax rate on urban commercial property is 5%. A comparison of the rate with local counties in our area, we find that Labette County (Parsons) is the only county in southeast Kansas that is higher at 5.3%. Crawford County is 3.8%. At 5%, a commercial property owner pays in property taxes the value of his property every 20 years and at 4%, 25 years. We must work to improve our stewardship or lucrative commercial ventures may bypass our community.

During KDOT’s regional meetings, I have provided them testimony in the shaping of their vision. In my opinion, completing 69 as a four-lane through Pittsburg and connecting to the Oklahoma Turnpike is vital to our long term growth strategy. In a way, we are competing against 169 in connecting Kansas City to Dallas with a future interstate.

On a personal note, I am 59 years old and have been married to Gloria Fischer for 30

years. She serves our veterans as a physician. Together, we have four children—Joseph, Mary, Noah, and Benjamin. Joseph graduated from K-State as a mechanical engineer and works for an ag tech company, 360 Yield. The other three are learning at KU and Washburn. They cherish our community and hope to return to serve here.

I am a licensed Professional Engineer with Bachelor and Master Degrees in civil engineering. My academic research experience revolves around bridge rehabilitation and I’ve presented this topic at the national American Society of Civil Engineers conference. I have a great deal of heavy construction experience as well as skills for solving complex problems. Along with my wife, I have some experience in the medical service sector also.

Our family delights in serving the public sector. We’re builders and we love this county and its people. If I have your trust and confidence, I would humbly ask for your vote for County Commissioner.

 

BoCo Commission Minutes of July 21

July 21, 2020 Tuesday 1:50 pm

The Bourbon County Commissioners met in open session with Commissioner Fischer and Oharah present as well as the County Clerk and Emergency Manager William Wallis.

Lynne made a motion to adopt Resolution 24-20 and to change the effective date of 7 days to 60 days (a resolution proclaiming a state of local disaster due to COVID, Will said this resolution will help the County continue to get financial aid due to COVID expenses), Jeff seconded and the motion passed.

At 1:54, Jeff made a motion to adjourn, Lynne seconded, meeting adjourned.

THE BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS
OF BOURBON COUNTY, KANSAS
(ss) Lynne Oharah, Chairman
(ss) Jeff Fischer, Commissioner
(ss) Nick Ruhl, Commissioner
ATTEST:
Kendell Mason, Bourbon County Clerk
July 24, 2020, Approved Date

BoCo Commission Minutes of July 20

July 20, 2020 Monday 1:30 pm

The Bourbon County Commission met in open session with all three Commissioners, the County Counselor and the County Clerk present.

Also present were the following… Jason Silvers with the Fort Scott Tribune, Angel Wilson and Lora Holdridge.

Lynne made a motion to go into a 10 minute executive session for personnel matters of individual non-elected personnel, Jeff seconded and all approved, (the session included the Commissioners and Appraiser Clint Anderson). After the session, Jeff made a motion to approve hiring a field appraiser due to future vacancy that will occur over the next few weeks, Nick seconded and all approved.

Jeff Fischer questioned a service charge that the Consolidated Rural Water District is charging; the Commissioners told him they had a board that should be contacted regarding their charges.

Lynne discussed a resolution for possible approval requiring that any grant applied for or accepted must be approved by the Commissioners; he thought it would be a good resolution for the County. Lynne made a motion to approve Resolution 24-20, there was not a second for his motion. Jeff asked if they were trying to solve a problem with the current granting process, Lynne said yes, Justin said it was a procedural issue which caused problems that the resolution could resolve for future grants. Jeff said that the wellness grants didn’t have the Commissioners approval for the application and said that last year they considered (but didn’t follow through with) a cost share grant from the Department of Transportation for an iron bridge in Garland. Jeff questioned if the resolution would be another barrier for obtaining grants. Justin said it would be putting a layer of protection in the grant process. Jeff questioned if the resolution would be reacting to a situation and said he didn’t think that was the right thing to do. Jeff made a motion to go into a 5 minute executive session for consultation with an attorney for the body or agency which would be deemed privileged in the attorney-client relationship, Nick seconded and all approved, (the session included the Commissioners and Justin Meeks). After the session Lynne made a motion to table the resolution until a later date and Nick seconded.

Jeff made a motion to go into a 3 minute executive session for personnel matters of individual non-elected personnel, Nick seconded and all approved, (the session included the Commissioners, Bobby Reed and Kendell Mason). Lynne made a motion to go into a 3 minute executive session for personnel matters of individual non-elected personnel, Jeff seconded and all approved, (the session included the Commissioners, Bobby Reed and Kendell Mason). After the session Jeff made a motion authorizing an employee in the Correctional Center to use donated vacation time in the community pool for sick leave (an employee can donate vacation time to an employee to use for sick leave), Nick seconded and all approved.

Jeff said the deadline is in August for submitting an application for KDOT funding for off system bridges, he asked it was the intent of the Commissioners to explore funding for the Jefferson bridge, Lynne said they still need to determine if they want to repair or replace the bridge. Jeff questioned if he should get the authority to write a proposal to fix the bridge, Lynne said they could direct public works to get a proposal. Jeff questioned if the bridge north of Fort Scott could have an at-grade crossing installed to eliminate the need for a bridge. Jeff made a motion to direct public works to complete an application for the two fracture critical bridges (Jefferson bridge and the bridge north of Fort Scott on old 69 Highway), Nick seconded and all approved.

Lynne said they should be more involved in the application process so they weren’t blindsided.

The Commissioners reviewed the 1st draft of the 2021 budget. Jeff said the draft didn’t include a budget for the medical mall or the PILOT money. The current mill levy for Bourbon County is 66.613, the estimated mill levy on the 1st draft of the budget is 67.131. Lynne said in 2019 Road & Bridge had spent more than they thought they had due to deposits not being correct. Lora Holdridge questioned if the draft of the budget included raises for non-elected employees, Lynne said Terry was instructed to enter the amount the department head requested, Jeff questioned if it was possible to encourage all of the departments to save money for a carryover to help fund a raise.

The Commissioners will have a budget work session on July 28th at 9:00 am. Lynne said the Commissioners will work with the department heads regarding the budgets.

Jeff made a motion to adjourn at 3:12, Nick seconded and all approved.

THE BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS
OF BOURBON COUNTY, KANSAS
(ss) Lynne Oharah, Chairman
(ss) Jeff Fischer, Commissioner
(ss) Nick Ruhl, Commissioner
ATTEST:
Kendell Mason, Bourbon County Clerk
July 24, 2020, Approved Date