FS Commission Agenda For July 7

AGENDA

FORT SCOTT CITY COMMISSION

FORT SCOTT CITY HALL

COMMISSION ROOM

123 SOUTH MAIN

JULY 7, 2020

6:00 P.M.

I. ROLL CALL:

K. ALLEN P. ALLEN NICHOLS WATTS MITCHELL

II. FLAG SALUTE:

III. INVOCATION: Pastor

IV. PROCLAMATIONS/RECOGNITIONS: Recognition of Payden Blythe, Police Officer

Introduction of Nate Stansberry, City Engineer

V. CONSENT AGENDA:

  1. Approval of minutes of the regular meeting of June 16th, 2020, special meeting of June 24th, 2020 and June 30th, 2020.

  1. Approval of Appropriation Ordinance 1266-A totaling $804,125.90.

  1. Skitch’s Hauling & Excavation, Inc. – March port-a-pottie fees – $2,153.00; April $1,911.00; and May $2,153.00 – Totaling $6,217.00.

  1. Request to Pay – Insco Industries – $67,937.35 – Clarifier Painting Project – Water Plant

  1. Request to Pay – Southeast Kansas Regional Planning Commission – $4,000.00 – Fire Truck Grant

  1. May financials

VI. APPEARANCE/COMMENTS/PUBLIC HEARING:

  1. APPEARANCE: Vanessa Poyner – Junior/Senior Prom – Saturday, July 25th, 2020 – Request for Street Closures: West Oak Street from Judson to National for Walk-In event. Request for parking lot behind Brewhaus Brewery for valet parking. Time requested: 2:00 p.m. to midnight – Waivers will be signed for all attendees and social distancing will be enforced.

Frank Halsey – Marmaton Massacre Event

Terry Sercer – 2019 Audit

B. CITIZEN COMMENTS: (Concerning Items Not on Agenda – 5 minute limit per citizen)

  1. PUBLIC HEARINGS/COMMENTS:

VII. CONSIDERATION:

  1. Pool Discussion – Consideration of fees
  1. Consideration of Financial Policy
  1. Consideration of Work Order #9 – Olsson Associates – Fort Scott Municipal Airport – Environmental Assessment
  1. Consideration of Change Order #10 – River Intake Project – Increase of $24,950.00

  1. Consideration of City Auctioneer Bid
  1. Consideration to pay Ace Pipeline
  1. Discussion of First Source Lease
  1. Consideration to remove some of the tree line near Hole #13 at Woodland Hills Golf Course

  1. Consideration to purchase used fairway mower – Golf Course
  1. Consideration to purchase Cushman Utility Cart for Golf Course and sign a four year lease for 30 gas 2020 golf carts from KGT

  1. Discussion of B.C.E.D.C.I. board activities (Pete Allen)

VIII. COMMENTS:

  1. Director Updates:
  1. Commission:

Kevin Allen – Executive Session regarding non-elected personnel

  1. City Attorney:
  1. City Manager:

EXECUTIVE SESSION:

I MOVE THAT THE CITY COMMISSION RECESS INTO EXECUTIVE

SESSION FOR ________________________________ IN ORDER TO

(see below justification)

DISCUSS ______________________________________. THE

EXECUTIVE SESSION WILL BE ___________ MINUTES AND THE OPEN

MEETING TO RESUME AT ________________.

Justifications for Executive Sessions:

  • Personnel matters of non-elected personnel

  • Consultation with an attorney for the body or agency which would be deemed privileged in the attorney-client relationship

  • Matters relating to employer-employee negotiations whether or not in consultation with the representative or representatives of the body or agency

  • Confidential data relating to financial affairs or trade secrets of corporations, partnerships, trusts and individual proprietorships

  • Preliminary discussions relating to the acquisition of real property

X. MOTION FOR ADJOURNMENT: ROLL CALL

COVID 19 Cases in Bourbon County: 36

SEK Multi-County Health Departments

Allen, Anderson, Bourbon, and Woodson Counties

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update

July 6, 2020

Allen County

Current Positive Cases 3
Current Recovered Cases 2
Total Positives Since Testing 5-1 removed-out of state and to remain there
Deaths 0

Anderson County

Current Positive Cases 2
Current Recovered Cases 3
Total Positives Since Testing 5
Deaths 0

Bourbon County

Current Positive Cases 22
Presumptive Cases 1-listed on KDHE website, tested negative
Current Recovered Cases 14-includes presumptive case
Total Positives Since Testing 36
Deaths 1

Woodson County

Current Positive Cases 1
Current Recovered Cases 11
Total Positives Since Testing 12
Deaths 0

Recovered cases are based on dates of onset of symptoms, not on day testing results are received.

American Legion Post 25 Scuttlebutt 

 

Kudos to Post 25’s own Myra Jowers as the incoming Second District Commander for the 2020 – 21 Legion year. Commander Jowers will be guiding 24 Second District Posts for the next year.

In addition to Myra assuming the helm of Second District leadership, Post 25 Commander Carl Jowers was elected as Second District Adjutant/Finance Officer and Post 25 Adjutant Leslie Montee was elected as Second District 3rd Year Executive Committeewoman.  This is the first time in years that Post 25 has several members in District leadership positions.

Post 25 Officers for 2020 – 21

 

First Name Last Name Title
Carl Jowers Commander
Leslie Montee Adjutant
     
James Collins Chaplain
Dean Stephen Executive Committee
Marvin Taylor Executive Committee
Michael Hansen Executive Committee
Darrell Spencer Finance Officer
Kenneth Lyon Historian
Myra Jowers Service Officer
Jake Campbell Sgt at Arms
     
Sylvia Norris Auxiliary President
Michael Johnson SAL Commander
Jessica Allison ALR Director

 

Membership

Post 25 finished the recent Legion year with 100 members and as the Second District’s number one Post in membership. Our 2021 membership goal has not yet been announced.

The 2021 membership cards have arrived.  Any member desiring to pay their 2021 dues can pay them at our meeting on Monday or go online to www.legion.org and follow the prompts to renew. Dues are still $40 per year.

Renewal notices will also be mailed out in July to both current members and members whose membership has expired.

Upcoming Events

July 6. American Legion Post 25 general membership meeting at 7 pm in Memorial Hall. Our regular Post meet and greet starts at 6:30 pm.

July 9. American Legion Auxiliary Unit 25 meets at 600 pm in Memorial Hall.

July 9.  American Legion Post 25 Color Guard meets at 730 pm in Memorial Hall. All Post 25 Legion family members can join the Post 25 Color Guard. This includes Auxiliary and Sons of the American Legion Squadron members.

May 15 -17. Department Convention at the Ramada Hotel. The Department Convention is open to all Legionnaires.

Don’t hesitate to contact me or any Officer with any suggestions to improve Fort Scott American Legion Post 25.

Carl Jowers. Post 25 Commander.

620-215-1688

carljowers@gmail.com

New COVID 19 Case In Bourbon County

Bourbon and Allen Counties both have new COVID 19 cases today, said Bourbon County Health Officer Rebecca Johnson.
“Bourbon County has a new positive COVID-19 case today,” she said. “This individual is also symptomatic and in isolation. Their family is in quarantine. The investigation is complete.”
“Allen County has a positive COVID-19 case today,” Johnson said.  “The individual is symptomatic and in isolation. Their family is in quarantine. The Allen County Public Health Department is diligently working to notify all close contacts and complete the investigation.”

Masks By Pastor James Collins

Then saith one of his disciples, Judas Iscariot, Simon’s son, which should betray him, Why was not this ointment sold for three hundred pence, and given to the poor? This he said, not that he cared for the poor; but because he was a thief, and had the bag, and bare what was put therein.

John 12:4-6

When I was a kid, I used to wear a mask. It was a Superman mask. Superman was my favorite hero. When I was seven, I read so many Superman comic books that I really thought I was Superman.

I made a Superman suit. I had a Superman t-shirt, a red bath towel for a cape, and a pair of red Underoos that I wore outside my pants. I completed my costume with a plastic Superman mask from an old Halloween costume. The mask had jet black wavy hair with a j-curl that went down in the middle of the forehead. Without the mask, I was just James. I was a mild-mannered, nerdy little kid. But when I put on my Superman mask, I thought I was the Man of Steel.

One morning, I was sitting in the kitchen eating Fruity Pebbles out of a plastic butter bowl. I was wearing my Superman outfit. I lifted the mask to get a bite of cereal and put it back down to chew. In my mind, Superman was having breakfast.

While I was eating, I was also reading a Superman comic book. I don’t know if it was the comic book, the sugary Fruity Pebbles, or a combination of both, but I got all excited and believed that I was Superman. I took off running through the house. I was faster than a speeding vacuum cleaner. More powerful than the dog. Able to leap coffee tables in a single bound. Look! Up on the kitchen counter. It’s a toaster. It’s a microwave. No. It’s a kid in a mask who thinks he is Superman!

I went running through the house. As I jumped over the table in the living room, I knocked off a lamp. It fell off the table and shattered to pieces.

Momma had told me a hundred times not to run in the house. So, the consequence was a spanking. Momma was about to spank me when I said, “Wait.” I took off my Superman mask, bent over, and said, “Okay, now.” I needed to take off the mask because Superman never got a whipping. You must think like a seven-year-old kid to understand this, but when I put on that mask, I was Superman.

Sadly, many grown intelligent adults do the same thing. They wear a mask. The Bible tells us about a man named Judas. He was one of the disciples of Jesus. But he wore a mask. His mask concealed the truth. His mask hid his true identity.

The point is: It is better to live naked in truth than clothed in fantasy.

What sort of mask of untruth are you wearing?

What are you hiding behind your mask?

James Collins is the pastor of First Southern Baptist Church. Follow him on Twitter @collins_point, Facebook James Collins “The Point Is,” or at the website thepointis.net.

Seven New Cases of COVID 19 Yesterday Total

Bourbon County Health Officer Rebecca Johnson said there are five more positive COVID-19 cases.
Some are contacts of previous cases & some are not.
The Bourbon County Public Health Department is diligently working to complete the investigations.
Please stay home when sick, social distance, practice good hygiene & wear a mask in public.
There were seven total yesterday.

Two New Cases Of COVID 19 on July 3 In Bourbon County

On July 3, Bourbon County had two new positive COVID-19 cases today, Rebecca Johnson, Bourbon County Health Officer said.

One individual is symptomatic and the other is not.

One individual is a contact of a previously listed case and the other is not.

The investigations are complete.

Please use good judgment and protect yourself and those you’re in contact with.

Count Your Blessings by Patty LaRoche

Patty LaRoche

Happy Fourth of July! Today, I sit on my deck, recovering from the Covid-19 virus, grateful that I live in a small town in the Midwest where friends and neighbors have gone out of their way to bring food and run errands. One lake neighbor dropped off chocolates and Twizzlers and flowers on our steps while another, on his drive from Kansas City to Tulsa, stopped to shop for items we needed, including a miracle-find of Clorox Wipes. Pam, my Utah friend, called her homeopathic guru and over-nighted me herbs and vitamins. Cards have arrived, and daily, friends and family members text, asking about my improvement. Many have phoned Dave, my husband, when it was difficult for me to maintain any breath control to speak.

I can’t say enough about Dave. He has been a saint. I was quarantined to the basement for 14 days. Dave made sure I had a thermometer and an oxygen reader, and even though I had no taste buds, I never was without a plate of fruit (a wonderful, stocked refrigerator treat from our Stilwell friends). When I progressed to being able to walk up the stairs and sit on the deck, he stayed a step behind me to steady my walk, brought me blankets and disinfected the area.

All of those were wonderful blessings, but what has touched me the most has been the out-pouring of prayers. Oh, how I relied on those prayers! When I would cough so hard I thought my lungs would explode, when I would chill and sweat and be incapable of taking a deep breath, when every bone ached, when I was so unsteady I could barely make it to the bathroom, I remembered the prayer-warriors who were lifting me up.

And so, today I sit on my deck, taking time to thank a mighty God who, it seems, is not calling me Home quite yet. He is calming my normally-frantic brain and causing me to concentrate on the beauty of life. I am blessed to watch as three fishermen, unaware they are in my eyesight through our deck rails, patiently row around our dock, casting their lines in various directions, enjoying the moment, even though no fish are biting. Two squirrels, playing “tag” for the past hour, have found my peanut feeder and leave not a shell for their friends. Birds, hidden in the cascade of overgrown tree limbs, noisily chatter while a butterfly comes near enough for me to touch it. A sweet visit.

But then 14 geese, determined to visit every morning and leave their “mess” on our newly-concreted sidewalk, show up to eat the grass seed we planted a few weeks ago. Dave makes the walk to our dock, waving frantically to run them off. With their ruffled feathers, they honk and jump into the lake, but it is only a matter of time before they return. Life, as we all know, is not perfect. But a small town in the Midwest comes close.

In a few days, the lake will be a place of celebration as jet-skis and boats and campers come for a day of recreation and entertainment. Fireworks will be shot from docks, music will blare, and we all will be reminded of those whose sacrifice proved just how “unfree” freedom really is. This year, we small-towners have much to be thankful for. Here, we don’t have to worry that our shopping areas will be taken over by misdirected rioters who set up camp and intimidate gutless, city officials into acquiescing to their desires. Here, parents of toddlers playing in the front yard or youngsters watching television don’t have to guard against flying bullets. Here, store owners don’t need to plywood the windows on their stores or protect against thieves helping themselves to whatever loot they can carry away. Here, the American flag is revered, not burned.

Let us count our blessings, and even though there always are reminders (like unwanted geese) that small-town life might not be perfect, I imagine that most of us wouldn’t live anywhere else.

‘Notice of Loss’ for Failed, Prevented Planted Acres

USDA Announces Flexibilities for Producers Filing ‘Notice of Loss’ for Failed, Prevented Planted Acres

WASHINGTON, D.C., July 2, 2020 – The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is providing additional flexibilities for producers to file on acres with failed crops or crops that were prevented from planting because of extreme weather events. USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA) is adding these flexibilities for Notice of Loss on both insured and uninsured crops to enable Service Centers to best assist producers.  

With many program deadlines approaching, our Service Centers are working hard to accommodate as many producer appointments as possible,” said FSA Administrator Richard Fordyce. “By providing flexibilities to our Notice of Loss policy, we can ensure we provide the best customer service.”

Filing for Prevented Planted Acres

For insured crops, producers who timely filed a prevented planted claim with the reinsurance company but filed a Notice of Loss (CCC-576) form after the deadline will be considered timely filed for FSA purposes. FSA can use data from the Risk Management Agency (RMA) for accepting the report of prevented planting with FSA. If the information is not available through RMA, the producer may also provide proper evidence to FSA that the prevented planted claim was timely filed with the reinsurance company.

For uninsured crops, producers may start a Notice of Loss (CCC-576) by calling their FSA county office, or they may print and complete the Notice of Loss (CCC576) form from home and send to their county office. For prevented planted acreage, Notice of Loss forms mailed to the FSA office must be postmarked by the final acreage reporting date in the county to be considered timely filed. For all prevented planted cases, the Report of Acreage (FSA-578) form and the completed and signed Notice of Loss (CCC-576) must be filed by the applicable acreage reporting date.

Filing for Failed Acres

For failed acreage of uninsured crops, the Notice of Loss (CCC-576) must be completed, signed and verified before the disposition of the crop.

When to File a ‘Notice of Loss’

A Notice of Loss cannot be filed for a crop before the final planting date, but it can be filed before completing the crop acreage report.

More Information

Producers who miss FSA’s July 15 acreage reporting deadline will not face a late filing fee if filed within a month of the deadline.

For questions, please contact your FSA county office. To locate your FSA county office at your Service Center, visit farmers.gov/service-center-locator.

All USDA Service Centers are open for business, including some that are open to visitors to conduct business in person by appointment only. All Service Center visitors wishing to conduct business with FSA, Natural Resources Conservation Service or any other Service Center agency should call ahead and schedule an appointment. Service Centers that are open for appointments will pre-screen visitors based on health concerns or recent travel, and visitors must adhere to social distancing guidelines. Visitors may also be required to wear a face covering during their appointment. Field work will continue with appropriate social distancing. Our program delivery staff will be in the office, and they will be working with our producers in office, by phone and using online tools. More information can be found at farmers.gov/coronavirus.

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USDA is an equal opportunity provider, employer, and lender.

USDA Reminds Kansas Producers to Complete Crop Acreage Reports


(Manhattan, Kansas), July 2, 2020 – USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA) reminds Kansas producers to complete crop acreage reports by the applicable deadline for their county. Acreage reporting dates vary by crop and by county. Contact your FSA county office for a list of acreage reporting deadlines by crop.

To make sure you’re eligible for many USDA programs, you need to file an accurate crop acreage report by the applicable deadline,” said David Schemm, State Executive Director in Kansas. “Our FSA staff is standing by to help you with your acreage reports, including providing maps.”

The final acreage reporting date for Kansas is July 15 and includes spring-seeded small grains, feed grains, soybeans, and perennial forage.

Due to the pandemic, FSA has implemented acreage reporting flexibilities. FSA can work with producers to file timely acreage reports by phone, email, online tools and virtual meetings if needed.

The following exceptions apply to acreage reporting dates:

  • If the crop has not been planted by the acreage reporting date, the acreage must be reported no later than 15 calendar days after planting is completed.
  • If a producer has not timely filed an acreage report, the producer may file the acreage report within 30 days of the acreage reporting date. Because of the pandemic, late fees will be waived if filed within the 30 days.

FSA is also providing additional flexibilities for producers to file on acres with failed crops or crops that were prevented from planting because of extreme weather events. For insured crops, producers who timely filed a prevented planted claim with the reinsurance company but filed a Notice of Loss (CCC-576) form after the deadline will be considered timely filed for FSA purposes. For uninsured crops, producers may start a Notice of Loss by calling their FSA county office.

Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program (NAP) policy holders should note that the acreage reporting date for NAP-covered crops is the earlier of the dates listed above or 15 calendar days before grazing or harvesting of the crop begins.

When producers are working with FSA staff – either in-person or virtually – they can also take care of applications for other FSA programs, including the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program. A CFAP Call Center is available for producers who would like additional one-on-one support with the CFAP application process. Please call 877-508-8364 to speak directly with a USDA employee ready to offer assistance. The CFAP Call Center can provide service to non-English speaking customers. Customers will select 1 for English and 2 to speak with a Spanish speaking employee. For other languages, customers select 1 and indicate their language to the Call Center staff.

Applications can also be submitted for the Wildfire and Hurricane Indemnity Program Plus for 2018 and 2019 as well as other disaster assistance programs that may be able to assist producers at this time.

For questions, please call your FSA county office. To locate your local FSA office visit farmers.gov/service-center-locator.

All USDA Service Centers are open for business, including some that are open to visitors to conduct business in person by appointment only. All Service Center visitors wishing to conduct business with FSA, Natural Resources Conservation Service or any other Service Center agency should call ahead and schedule an appointment. Service Centers that are open for appointments will pre-screen visitors based on health concerns or recent travel and visitors must adhere to social distancing guidelines. Visitors may also be required to wear a face covering during their appointment. Field work will continue with appropriate social distancing. Our program delivery staff will be in the office, and they will be working with our producers in office, by phone and using online tools. More information can be found at farmers.gov/coronavirus.

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USDA is an equal opportunity provider, employer, and lender.

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