Nine FSHS Debate and Forensics Team Members Qualify For Nationals

Fort Scott High School Debate and Forensics team has been competing completely virtually all year.
Over the last few weeks students have been working to qualify to nationals through three district tournaments.
The last leg of this tournament was April 16-17.
The Talking Tigers have nine students who will be representing Fort Scott at Nationals in June.
Overall, Fort Scott placed 2nd in Congress sweeps and Speech Sweeps and 3rd in debate sweeps
 Several students qualified for nationals in multiple events but are only allowed to compete in one.
HERE IS THE FSHS NATIONAL QUALIFYING TEAM:
Congress House:

Neil Gugnani

and

Shekhar Gugnani
Congress Senate:

Lillian Collins
PFD: Thade Yates and Khris Patel
Informative 10:

Jadelynne Atherton-Russell
POI:

Kinsley Davis
HI:

Trent Toth

and Regen Wells

The entire Talking Tigers team has adjusted to every strange and different thing that has been thrown at them and this is the result of their hard work and dedication! They are a great representation of Fort Scott High School and we are extremely proud of them!
Submitted by
Angella Curran 

Fort Scott High School
Speech Communications
Debate/Forensics

Kansas Youth Community Change Conference June 1-15

Registration for the Kansas Youth Community Change Conference (KYC3) is now open! KYC3 is a FREE action-packed virtual event open to all middle and high school aged youth. Through youth-led interactive sessions and high energy activities, youth will expand their leadership skills, engage with other youth across the state, and take action to promote positive change in their schools and communities! Sessions will take place in the evening June 1st – 15th.

 

NEW THIS YEAR: There is a session for parents on June 9th at 8:00 PM. Parents must register in advance to attend the session!

 

To register, check out the prize packs, and view FAQs visit: https://www.dccca.org/events/2021-kyc3/

To view the agenda, visit: https://www.dccca.org/2021-kyc3-agenda/

To learn more about the youth planning team, check out: https://www.dccca.org/kyc3-youth-planning-team/

Kansas Governor Signs 10 Pieces of Legislation

Governor Laura Kelly Signs Several Pieces of Bipartisan Legislation

TOPEKA – Governor Laura Kelly today signed several bipartisan bills that will implement meaningful changes for Kansans, communities, and businesses.

House Bill 2071

HB 2071, as amended, would amend the definition of the crime of stalking to include intentionally engaging in a course of conduct targeted at a specific child under the age of 14 that would cause a reasonable person in the circumstances of the targeted child, or a reasonable person in the circumstances of an immediate family member of such child, to fear for such child’s safety.

House Bill 2085

HB 2085 creates the Students’ Right to Know Act, which requires the Kansas State Department of Education (KSDE) to ensure the distribution, electronic or otherwise, of certain information to all students in grades 7 through 12. Information to be distributed will include:

  • The State Board of Regents degree prospectus information;
  • The placement and salary report of the Kansas Training Information Program;
    and
  • Any other information relevant to students’ understanding of potential earnings as determined by the Department of Labor and each branch of the armed services of the U.S. military.

The bill also authorizes KSDE to enter into memorandums of understanding and other agreements with state agencies or other entities as needed to accomplish this task.

House Bill 2101

HB 2101 extends the current transfer of the first $10.5 million credited to the Expanded Lottery Act Revenues Fund (ELARF) from ELARF to the Kan-grow Engineering Fund – KU, the Kan-grow Engineering Fund – KSU, and the Kan-grow Engineering Fund – WSU with each fund receiving equal amounts of $3.5 million in each fiscal year, for FY 2023 through FY 2032. The transfer first occurred in FY 2013 and is currently scheduled to end with the transfer in FY 2022.

House Bill 2165

HB 2165, as amended, would amend the definition of an antique vehicle for purposes of vehicle registration.

House Bill 2167

HB 2167, as amended, would add two exceptions to law requiring a license plate to be attached to the rear of a motor vehicle. The bill would allow concrete mixer trucks the option to display a license plate on the front of the vehicle rather than on the rear of the vehicle and would require a dump truck with a gross weight of 26,000 pounds or more to display a license plate on the front of the vehicle. The requirement for a dump truck to display a license plate on the front of the vehicle would not apply to a vehicle registered as a farm truck.

House Bill 2245

HB 2245, as amended, would add law authorizing the Division of Vehicles (Division), Department of Revenue, to collect emergency contact information and would provide for the use of such information by law enforcement agencies.

House Bill 2247

HB 2247, as amended, would designate portions of highway in Johnson, Marshall, and Norton counties as memorial highways and would designate certain bridges in Cowley, Riley, and Seward counties as memorial bridges.

House Bill 2379

HB 2379 enacts the Peer-to-Peer (P2P) Vehicle Sharing Program Act.

Senate Bill 16

SB 16 would amend statutes to remove requirements that the following reports and certifications be provided to the Legislative Division of Post Audit (LPA), the Post Auditor, or the Legislative Post Audit Committee.

Senate Bill 89

SB 89, as amended, would amend law on securing loads on vehicles to create an exemption for trucks, trailers, or semitrailers when hauling agricultural forage commodities intrastate from the place of production to a market or place of storage or from a place of storage to a place of use. The bill would state this exemption would not apply to trucks, trailers, or semitrailers hauling hay bales or other packaged or bundled forage commodities. Continuing law requires securing a load on a vehicle so as to prevent any of this load from dropping, sifting, leaking, or otherwise escaping.

###

Granny Gear will Persevere by Carolyn Tucker

Carolyn Tucker. Submitted photo.

Keys to the Kingdom – Carolyn Tucker

 

My husband Jimmy and his two older brothers learned to haul hay when they were kids. This is one of the hardest jobs because it’s always miserably hot and the work is relentless. As with everything, there’s a fine art to being a real hay hauler. Not just anybody off the city sidewalk can do it — but a country boy can git ‘er done. The first year we were married, Jimmy and his friend Dave teamed up to haul hundreds of square hay bales for an area farmer. I got the easy job of driving the 1948 Chevy one-ton flatbed. All I had to do was hold ‘er in a smooth granny gear while the guys worked their sweaty precision with hay hooks, great balance, and combined coordination. Those boys had the muscles, technique, and perseverance to get the job done and deliver on their promise.

Persevere means to persist in, or remain constant, to a purpose or task in the face of difficulties. It means to follow through to the end, to stand firm, never give up, and be determined to finish. Where I come from, persevere means to carry on, keep at it, press on, hammer away, stick with it, hang on like a Bulldog and finish what you start.

There’s a fine art to being a genuine Christian. Every born-again believer can do it, but not everyone wants to live a lifestyle of unswerving commitment. Any numbskull can “lay down in the hayfield” and give up. Believers must make a lifetime decision to persevere in their walk of obedience with God. As God’s children, we ought to be strong in character and represent our Father excellently. When King David was instructing Solomon on building the temple, he told him to be courageous and get to work. Don’t be fearful of the task, for God will see to it that everything is finished correctly.

Jimmy and Dave wouldn’t have hauled the hay at no charge. They were expecting payment for their efforts, and the farmer was expecting his field to be stripped clean. The scripture states that God rewards His children when they make an effort to truly know Him. “And it is impossible to please God without faith. Anyone who wants to come to Him must believe that God exists and that He rewards those who sincerely seek Him” (Hebrews 11:6 NLT).

One of the best biblical examples of perseverance is Noah. He found favor with the Lord because he was a righteous man, the only blameless person living on earth, and he walked in close fellowship with God. When God told Noah to build an ark, it took him 100 years to finish it! Because Noah didn’t stop hammering away, he and his family were saved from the flood. God rewarded that family of eight with the gift of life.

The end of a thing is better than its beginning; the patient in spirit is better than the proud in spirit” (Ecclesiastes 7:8 NKJV). It’s not how you start, it’s how you finish. It wasn’t how many bales were in the field at the beginning, it’s how many were in the barn at the end. Christians are in a race to win the heavenly prize. But you’ve got to pace yourself so you can endure and make it across the finish line. It’s like living your life in granny gear — just keep it steady and don’t quit. Quitters never win and winners never quit. Believe it or not, granny gear will get you across the Jordan River and through the Pearly Gates.

The Key: Persevere, keep it in granny gear, and God will help you be a winner.

Why is Bourbon County/Fort Scott Shrinking? By Greg Motley

Greg Motley. President of the Bourbon County Economic Development Council. Submitted photo.

 

Submitted by Gregg Motley, President of BEDCO

My wife and I have lived in Fort Scott these past six years, and love it here as it reminds us of the towns in which we grew up. We just agreed to purchase our retirement home out in the county. There is much to love! So why is it shrinking? Let me postulate ten primary reasons from my research over the years:

1. Rapid industrialization during and after WWII

Small town America led the growth of this county until 1941 when we ramped up the war effort. Factories were built in large cities near a concentration of the supply of labor, and urbanism began.

2. Change in tax policies to promote manufacturing

With the need to build our war machine came tax incentives from Washington in the form of tax credits and accelerated depreciation to benefit primarily these large city manufacturers; this began the great tax transfer from small-town earners to large city companies.

3. Agricultural efficiencies and the drop of ag employment

Most of us are aware that it takes far fewer agricultural workers to produce a crop and manage a herd. Ag employment per acre has dropped precipitously over the last 75 years.

4. Rapid transportation: planes, trains, and automobiles

Our mobile society makes it much easier for our young people to seek employment in faraway places, primarily big cities near transportation centers.

5. Global competition created the need for economy of scale

Due to technology, the world is much smaller now, making it easier for companies to go nationwide/global. To create efficiencies, industries have consolidated, as evidenced by the over 15,000 banks 40 years ago, condensed to 4,519 at yearend 2020.

6. Increase in regulation

New government regulations, such as the Patriot Act, have dramatically increased the cost of doing business, crowding out mom and pop companies in small towns.

7. Advent of “Big Box” retailers

One word: Wal-Mart. Need I say more?

8. Access to technology/online shopping

The Internet has revolutionized the world, and retail has paid the price. This has disproportionately impacted small-town America.

9. Loss of desire for community

We are devolving from a relationship culture to an entertainment culture. Give me experiences! There is nothing to do here! We are becoming human doings, instead of human beings.

10. Entertainment culture

Building on number 9, who are our highest paid citizens? It is those who entertain us, who seldom live in small towns. In a capitalist society, money flows toward what we value.

There are many more, but these are megatrends that have strangled small towns, through no fault of their own. Other than the energy sector areas, the trends are impacting small towns universally and disproportionally. What can we do about it? A topic for the next article.

 

 

Spring Livestock Shows: Quality Time With Family

Dale Lanham. Submitted photo.

Spring has finally arrived and it is time for the many spring livestock shows.

The comment I hear many times that it sure takes a lot of time and money to participate in the various shows.

But the quality time spent with your family working together taking care of their livestock projects is definitely well worth the expense and time involved.

To be successful in most endeavors takes a lot of time and practice to succeed. If your 4-Her or FFA member wants to be the winner in their showmanship contest at their county fair, then they need to exhibit at some of the local spring shows.

The experience gained for both the youth showing and the animals being shown can not be duplicated by working their animals at
home.

Nothing compares to the actual show ring experience.

The 45th annual Woodson County Spring Beef Show will be April 24, 2021, at the fairgrounds in Yates Center. This is one of the longest-running spring shows that is designed for the younger or less experienced show person. But will still be beneficial for all showman.

Success sometimes can just be getting your animal into the show ring and having it under control so that it doesn’t get away from the showman.

Small accomplishments lead up to bigger and better successes.

At the Woodson County shows, no money is given out but if you get lucky you may get to take a trophy or plaque home.

The sheep and goat show are also in the afternoon on April 24th. If you want to, you can show beef in Yates Center in the morning and show your beef in Burlington (20 miles) in the afternoon.

Sheep and goat exhibitors could also show their animals in Burlington in the morning and make the Yates Center show in the afternoon.

For more information about Woodson County Spring Shows or other area shows, contact your local Southwind Extension Staff or email me at the Yates Center office: dlanham@ksu.edu.

Features of Friendship

Barbara Stockebrand. K-State Extension Agent. Submitted photo.

Barbara Stockebrand

Southwind Extension District –Yates Center

Family and Consumer Sciences

 

Many older adults are beginning to venture out of their safe havens with feelings of relief and caution as more are becoming fully vaccinated against Covid-19. There is excitement among them to be resuming more regular activities that the virus so abruptly put on hold.

Scheduling medical appointments that were delayed and planning trips that were all put on the back burner are goals again. Many may be planning to see children and grandchildren they may not have seen for months – or longer. Others are planning outings with friends for the first time in a long time. Simple things that previously felt unsafe now feel possible.

Regardless of our age, we all benefit from having those in our lives we call friends. The importance of relationships with friends and the value of being connected to others cannot be overstated. As said by Thomas Aquinas, “There is nothing on this earth more to be prized than true friendship.”

Meaningful friendships have meaningful results. They produce mutual respect, trust, support, acceptance, joy, empathy, and love to name a few elements of friendship. A good friend won’t hesitate from telling you the truth, even if it is something you may not want to hear.

Friendships are good for our health. Healthy friendships can boost our physical and emotional health in several ways:

Personal improvement – If we want to make a positive change in our life, such as quit smoking, a friend’s support can make all the difference. He/she is usually right there with us encouraging us, boosting our self-confidence. Our chances of reaching our goals increase.

Knowing that others care – and that we care for them, increases feelings of compassion, self-worth, and security.

Support in life’s challenges – It might be retirement, death of a loved one or another difficult life event, research has found that having friends in our corner increases our ability to manage, persevere, and recover.

According to a 2017 Michigan State University study, it was found that friends begin to have a bigger impact on our well-being than family members as we grow old. This gives credence to the need to pay attention to our friends all along life’s journey in order to be there for each other during major transitions. Friendship is a lifelong endeavor.

 

We still should proceed with caution as we start mingling. Some of our friends and neighbors may not be fully vaccinated or they may desire not to do so for their own reasons. As goes with being friends, we need to be respectful of each other’s position and health needs to continue cultivating those friendships.

K-State Research and Extension is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

FSCC Board of Trustees Will Meet April 19

The Fort Scott Community College Board of Trustees will meet Monday, April 19 at 5:30 p.m. The meeting will take place in the Cleaver-Burris-Boileau Hall on the campus.

 

Normally, the agenda with the minutes are emailed to be posted for the public, however this month the entire agenda will be listed on the Fort Scott Community College on the Board of Trustees page on the college’s website.

 

I am not able to email the whole document because of the file size,” Juley McDaniels, FSCC Human Resource Director said. “We have a Request For Proposal, so the bids have really increased the size of the whole file.  The agenda in its entirety will be listed on our Board of Trustees page on the website.  In the meantime, here is what will be covered.”

 

Items to be discussed:

  1. Approval of heating/air conditioner service provider
  2. Consideration of land transfer to Mary Queen of Angels Church
  3. Consideration of fine arts center audio/visual refresh bids

 

 

Fort Scott City Commission Minutes of April 6

CITY OF FORT SCOTT

CITY COMMISSION MEETING

All minutes are unapproved until the next meeting.

Minutes of April 6th, 2021 Regular Meeting #7

The regular meeting of the Fort Scott City Commission was held April 6th, 2021 at 6:00 p.m. in the City Commission Meeting Room at City Hall, 123 S. Main Street, Fort Scott, Kansas.

ROLL CALL:

Commissioners P. Allen, K. Allen, R. Nichols, and L. Watts were present with Mayor J. Jones presiding.

INVOCATION: Associate Pastor Allen Pruitt, Grace Baptist Tabernacle, said a prayer asking God for guidance for the City, our Government and City officials.

AUDIENCE IN ATTENDANCE: Travis Shelton, Russell Lingerfelt, Devin Tally, Michael Mix, Michael Hoyt, Susan Bancroft, Rachel Pruitt, Jon Carpenter, Jenna Campbell, Traci Reed, Bobby Reed, Bill Martin, Scott Johnson, Jason Solomon, Dave Bruner, Peter Earles, Janice Allen, and Allyson Turvey.

PROCLAMATIONS/RECOGNITIONS: Introduction of Jon Carpenter, new Law Enforcement Officer Academy Graduate – Travis Shelton, Chief of Police, introduced Jon Carpenter. He started with the department in August and left for academy in November. He graduated recently from academy. In normal conditions, many from the department, would have attended the graduation. Due to Covid, that is now limited. His family attended his gradation from the parking lot and celebrated with balloons and is very proud of him.

ADDITIONS TO AGENDA: There were no additions to the agenda.

R. Nichols moved to approve the agenda. L. Watts seconded. All voted aye.

APPROVED AGENDA.

CONSENT AGENDA:

  1. Approval of minutes of the regular meeting of March 16th, 2021 and special meeting minutes of March 23rd, 2021, and March 30th, 2021.

  1. Approval of Appropriation Ordinance 1285-A totaling $887,464.66.

  1. Request to Pay – HDR Engineering, Inc – $12,405.00 – Phase II Dam Improvements – River Intake Project

P. Allen said he wished to address the minutes of the last meeting regarding the payment to Pipe Detectives.

City Manager asked Michael Mix to address this topic.

Michael said that they did three taps and then there were 15 hours of specialty removal which were roots mainly. They did make a mistake on their invoice that you saw. It said taps but it was specialty removal and 15 hours worth. That could be some of the confusion. It was just a labeling mistake.

P. Allen said that was approved by him. If the invoice was incorrect, it should have been addressed by Michael. That is false information. We are charged to pay the bills by information given to us.

Michael said that the invoice he signed off on was correct.

Kevin said that we only saw three taps when watching the videos.

Michael said that the finished product is the final inspection of those lines. Every second and minute is recorded. There is over five hours worth of root removal that was given to us.

P. Allen asked if he was guessing on the root removal.

Michael said that there is some amount of trust with a contractor. They did call him up when issues arose.

Discussion was held on documentation of calls.

Michael said that he reviewed all the videos and he believes they did an excellent job and charged us for what they did.

R. Nichols said that he asked the Clerk to document more of his comments under the micro meat packaging plant which she did. They are on their spot at the table.

L. Watts moved to approve the Consent Agenda. R. Nichols seconded. K. Allen, R. Nichols, L. Watts, and J. Jones voted aye. P. Allen voted no. Motion carried 4-1.

APPROVED CONSENT AGENDA.

Public Comment:

(Sign up required. Comments on any topic not on the agenda and limited to 5 minutes per person, at Commission discretion)

Michael Hoyt – Mr. Hoyt handed Bob Farmer, City Attorney, a copy of the United States Constitution. He asked him what the 21st amendment was. He answered that it was a repeal of the 18th amendment allowing the sale of alcoholic beverages.

Bourbon County Commission – This morning at their meeting they have dictated to us how they are going to handle an advisory board for an HR Assistant/Administrator that we are going to share. That’s not the way we do it. We solicit letters of interest and then you vote on them. He doesn’t see why this should be any different on an advisory board shared by the City and the County.

K. Allen said that this is the first he has heard of this.

Mr. Hoyt said that they were speaking on shared services.

City Attorney said until the County notifies us, and we see it in black and white, it’s a pointless discussion.

Scott Johnson – Mr. Johnson said that he appreciates the positive communication with Fire, Police and the Sheriff. He printed off a list of items that he wants out of the Eagle Block building. He doesn’t know what he needs to do to clarify or what needs to be done to get a contract written properly. What he agreed to on record he feels like has not been done. He isn’t trying to backtrack on it but just wants clarification. Also, if there was an interested party, why wasn’t he notified of it. He said the building didn’t need to get to this point and it should be looked into. He left a list of items that he wished to remove from the building at 10 N. National with the City Clerk. He said that he is working on the marina at Lake Fort Scott still. He has been working with Travis Shelton and Dave Bruner on this. He won’t be selling any fuel, tobacco, or alcohol there. Even though it is a City lake, it is on County property. It will be just ice and snacks and things like that.

City Manager Report and Comments: Jeremy Frazier, City Manager, informed the Commission that on March 25th he took part in a guided tour of the First Source building led by Rachel with a local realtor for a prospective new tenant. There could be potential future discussions at which time it would come before the Commission for consideration. He said that the City is blessed to have engaged policy makers, staff, and citizens. In an effort to select a qualified engineering firm, administration organized a committee which included himself, Commissioner Pete Allen, Commissioner Kevin Allen, Susan Bancroft, and Gary Cullor. In addition, he thanked these individuals for serving on this committee for selecting, interviewing, and negotiating the contract for engineering services which he hopes you approve today. He also thanked Leah Bowman for her assistance in checking the engineering background references. He attended a See-Click-Fix kickoff on March 30th. This will begin rolling out in May or June. The meeting outlined the rollout process. He met with Congressman Jake LaTurner and his staff while touring the National Historic Fort along with the Mayor and Park service staff. The Congressman was very gracious and expressed a desire to serve the community of Fort Scott. He attended the Chamber Coffee, grand opening and ribbon cutting on April 1st of Old 54 Cycle. It was a well attended and well organized event. The City appreciates the Chamber’s leadership and work serving the business community of Fort Scott. He met with the Mayor and County leadership to discuss a possible additional School Resource Officer in the schools and also expansion of the baseball field. They also discussed other potential cost sharing ideas for the future. He participated in a guided tour of Lake Fort Scott and thanked Tom Graham, the Lake Patrol Officer. He knows everybody at the Lake. He met with Senator Jerry Moran to discuss needs and goals for the community of Fort Scott. He said that Randy and Kevin both joined him at Labconco this morning. He also met with residents in the area of Nelson Park to discuss drainage and sanitary sewer issues in that area of town that need addressed. The City has several job postings for several positions and urged anyone interested to review and apply for the open positions.

Director Reports: None

Old Business:

  1. Approval of Ordinance amending Assessment of Mowing Costs from $300.00 to $75.00 – Ordinance No. 3576 – Susan Bancroft, Director of Finance, informed the Commission that this was approved at the last meeting. The ordinance will make it official which will change the mowing assessment from $300.00 per mowing to $75.00 per mowing.

K. Allen moved to approve Ordinance No. 3576 which lowers the mowing assessment from $300.00 to $75.00. L. Watts seconded. All voted aye.

APPROVED ORDINANCE NO. 3576 AMENDING SECTION 8.24.040, ABATEMENT, ASSESSMENT OF COSTS, OF CHAPTER 8.24, WEED CONTROL, OF THE FORT SCOTT MUNICIPAL CODE. LOWERED MOWING ASSESSMENT COSTS FROM $300.00 PER MOWING TO $75.00 PER MOWING.

  1. Discussion of Golf Course Tiered Memberships – City Manager informed the Commission that the Golf Course Advisory Board met on March 24th, 2021 to discuss the tiered memberships. The Board suggested that Shannon O’Neil collect zip codes from the golfers and bring back to the City Commission in 2022 to gather data. A recommendation can be made at that time.

K. Allen said that he did hear some negative feedback from the players and there is some resistance.

Discussion was also held regarding paying the yearly membership in installments. Susan said that the City’s point of sale system will not allow for that. She said she could explore a different point of sale system if directed to.

Appearances: None

Public Hearings: 6:15 p.m. – Petition for Vacation of the platted 2nd Street East of South Lincoln Street – Approval of Ordinance No. 3577

L. Watts moved to open the Public Hearing at 6:32 p.m. R. Nichols seconded. All voted aye.

OPENED PUBLIC HEARING AT 6:32 P.M.

City Manager asked Ally to address this issue.

Allyson Turvey, Codes Administrator, said she received a petition from a resident to vacate the platted 2nd Street east of South Lincoln Street. There was a map included also on this particular street. The street dead ends between two properties. They found the part of their storage facility was on the City’s easement. Each of the surrounding property owners have signed off on the petition to vacate this alley. This was requested by Mike Rogers and Austin DuVall.

There were no comments from the audience.

R. Nichols moved to approved Ordinance No. 3577 – Vacation of Street. L. Watts seconded. R. Nichols, L. Watts, and J. Jones voted aye. K. Allen and P. Allen both abstained. Motion carried 3-2.

APPROVED ORDINANCE NO. 3577 TO VACATE THE PLATTED 2ND STREET LOCATED EAST OF SOUTH LINCOLN EAST BETWEEN LOTS 11, BLOCK 9, ANDRICK’S ADDITION, AND LOT 1, BLOCK 9, ANDRICK’S ADDITION, AND LOT 1, BLOCK 10, ANDRICK’S ADDITION, TO THE CITY OF FORT SCOTT, KANSAS, MORE COMMONLY KNOWN AS 2ND STREET EAST OF SOUTH LINCOLN STREET.

L. Watts moved to close the Public Hearing at 6:38 p.m. R. Nichols seconded. All voted aye.

CLOSED PUBLIC HEARING AT 6:38 P.M.

New Business:

  1. Approval of Ordinance No. 3578 – Ordinance authorizing the levy of a .5% Citywide retailer’s sales tax and related matters – City Manager asked Susan to address this issue.

Susan said that this Ordinance approves the ½ cent sales tax that just passed, and it basically is what needs to be sent to the State. There was a revised copy at the table with the definition that stated the purpose of this .5% sales tax.

J. Jones asked if she was 100% sure that it was a general purpose tax and not a special purpose tax. Susan said that she has a letter from the State of Kansas that verifies that and she can provide them with a copy if needed.

R. Nichols moved to approve Ordinance No. 3578 authorizing the levy of a .5% sales tax in the City. L. Watts seconded. R. Nichols, L. Watts, and J. Jones voted aye. P. Allen voted no. K. Allen abstained.

APPROVED ORDINANCE NO. 3578 OF THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE CITY OF FORT SCOTT, KANSAS, AUTHORIZING THE LEVY OF A ONE-HALF PERCENT (0.5%) CITY-WIDE RETAILERS’ SALES TAX AND RELATED MATTERS.

  1. Consideration of Change Order – Mayco Ace CDBG Project – Rachel informed the Commission that on February 16th, 2021, the City Commission approved the Mayco Ace CDBG Project and authorized the Mayor to sign all pertinent documentation. According to our purchase policy, all change orders have to come to the City Commission for approval. This change order is for $8,500. This will probably not be the last change order due to the condition of the roof. This change order is due to the drop-down ceiling and all the old electrical they found when cleaning this out.

R. Nichols moved to approve the Change Order #1 in the amount of $8,500 for the Mayco Ace CDBG project. L. Watts seconded. P. Allen, R. Nichols, L. Watts, and J. Jones voted aye. K. Allen abstained. Motion carried 4-1.

APPROVED CHANGE ORDER #1 IN THE AMOUNT OF $8,500 FOR THE MAYCO ACE CDBG PROJECT.

Rachel said that there will be another Change Order coming. She asked if they would approve the next Change Order to prevent another meeting contingent upon the State approving it.

City Manager said that he would encourage them to bring the Change Order back to the Commission.

L. Watts asked if this would be holding up the project.

Rachel said that a special meeting would have to be called.

L. Watts made a motion to approve for the Mayor to sign the next Change Order after it is approved at the State level. R. Nichols seconded. R. Nichols, L. Watts, and J. Jones voted aye. P. Allen voted no. K. Allen abstained. Motion carried 3-1-1.

APPROVED FOR THE MAYOR TO SIGN THE NEXT CHANGE ORDER FOR THE MAYCO ACE CDBG PROJECT AFTER IT IS APPROVED AT THE STATE LEVEL.

  1. Discussion and presentation of importance of water/sewer rate study – Jason Solomon – Kansas Rural Water Association – Jason Solomon, Kansas Rural Water Association, appeared before the Commission to encourage the City to consider using someone for a more advanced water/sewer rate study. Kansas Rural Water Association’s rate study is very general. He recommended Carl Brown as he can give the City a model and an analysis to make decisions in the future. This study can assist with grant funding in the future. It is an important decision for the future. He provided the City with references for Carl Brown and urged them to check him out and his references.

K. Allen asked if we could get a free water rate study from Kansas Rural Water Association.

Mr. Solomon said yes. It would be very basic though and not have a lot of detailed information.

City Manager asked if K.R.W.A. thought our system was too complex.

Mr. Solomon said yes but they can provide a basic analysis for the City.

K. Allen moved to get a free water rate analysis from Kansas Rural Water Association. P. Allen seconded. All voted aye.

APPROVED TO GET A FREE WATER RATE ANALYSIS FROM KANSAS RURAL WATER ASSOCIATION.

  1. Consideration of Wrecker Rotation Policy – Traci Reed, Dispatch Supervisor, informed the Commission that we have several different towing companies in the City. They serve on a day-to-day rotation basis. They have had several issues with tow companies showing up when it is not their designated day, without proper identification imposed by the State of Kansas, making complaints on another wrecker service, jumping calls, consistencies, and charges. She spoke with the Chief of Police and Sheriff Martin. Sheriff Martin got together a policy and shared it with her. In the past, the City and County have always been the negotiating factor with tow companies. With this policy, if approved, will address all of these situations.

L. Watts asked if it had been approved by the County.

K. Allen said when they had a meeting, one of the topics was storage fees. He asked if this would include a heavy truck like a semi truck.

Sheriff Martin said that he reached out to insurance companies and their adjusters will be on site within a week or less. After that agreement is made, those rates can increase to what they need to be.

K. Allen asked about penalties.

Traci said with the first penalty will come as a certified letter saying an investigation would be started. The Sheriff, Chief of Police, and herself will get together and decide the outcome. There is a written warning, probationary status, or suspension.

Sheriff Martin said a jumping of a call would be a written notice. It would depend on the circumstances. He did say that the County has not signed off on this as this is a question of operations for the Sheriff Department and he does not need Commission approval for that.

K. Allen moved to approve the Tow Rotation Policy. L. Watts seconded. All voted aye.

APPROVED TOW ROTATION POLICY.

  1. Consideration of Dispatch Contract – Bob Farmer, City Attorney, said that the Bourbon County Commission approved the Dispatch Contract this morning at their meeting. This lease agreement is for ten (10) years and commences on June 1st, 2021 and ends on June 1st, 2031. The City will pay no monthly rent to the County. The City will pay for all repairs to the building and no remodeling will be completed without the County’s approval. He suggested since they have not seen it they could table it at this time.

Discussion was held how quickly they need to proceed with the work they are doing.

L. Watts suggested moving this to the bottom of the agenda and then come back to this item.

J. Jones moved to approve the Dispatch Contract. K. Allen seconded. All voted aye.

APPROVED DISPATCH CONTRACT LEASE AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE CITY AND BOURBON COUNTY.

  1. Consideration of Contract Mowing Bid – Ally Turvey said the City went out for contract mowing for yards with weeds violations. The bids were opened on March 25th, 2021 at 10:00 a.m. The apparent low bidder is Justin Uhler of Fort Scott in the amount of $17.50 for residential properties and $20.00 for large residential properties. She recommended the low bid for Justin Uhler.

R. Nichols moved to approve the low bid for contract mowing from Justin Uhler. L. Watts seconded. All voted aye.

APPROVED LOW BID FOR CONTRACT MOWING FROM JUSTIN UHLER IN THE AMOUNT OF $17.50 FOR RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES AND $20.00 FOR LARGE RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES.

  1. Consideration of RFP’s – 10 N. National – Ally Turvey said that we had a Land Bank meeting a couple of weeks ago where the Board proposed to go out for RFP’s on the interior demolition of the property at 10 N. National. There was some question at that meeting as to whether the County would be willing to waive dump fees for that project. That is the discussion for tonight.

Susan said that the County cannot waive dump fees. The County Counselor said that the County cannot waive the fees. The City is not doing the interior demolition but it would be a private contractor.

K. Allen said that he thinks we need to look into this and asked Bob Farmer about it.

Bob said that the County controls the dump and we don’t have a say.

J. Jones said that we might as well take the debris down south and save money.

K. Allen said that we want to be able to work with the Commission. We need to come to a reasonable solution.

Ally asked if they are wanting to wait to go out for RFP’s on the interior demolition of this structure until this is decided? This property is ready to collapse, and it has been quite some time.

K Allen said that building has been like that for four or five years.

Ally said that the roof has collapsed and it is becoming more and more dangerous.

Susan said that you can send the RFP with a bid for demolition fees and an alternative bid without demolition fees to the contractors.

L. Watts said that is the direction to go.

Ally said that the Land Bank/City is going to be responsible for the costs of the demolition and the dump fees.

L. Watts made a motion to go out for RFP’s with and without dump fees. R. Nichols seconded. All voted aye;

APPROVED TO SEND OUT RFP’S FOR INTERIOR DEMOLITION OF THE STRUCTURE AT 10 N. NATIONAL WITH DUMP FEES INCLUDED AND WITHOUT DUMP FEES INCLUDED.

(Kevin Allen left the meeting at 7:32p.m.)

  1. Request to pay – Skitch’s Hauling & Excavation – February invoice – Port-A-Potties – $968.00 – City Manager said this is before them for review and approval.

J. Jones moved to approve the Skitch’s Hauling & Excavation Invoice in the amount of $968.00. P. Allen seconded. All voted aye.

APPROVED SKITCH’S HAULING & EXCAVATION INVOICE FOR FEBRUARY FOR PORT-A-POTS IN THE AMOUNT OF $968.00.

(Kevin Allen returned to the room at 7:35 p.m.)

  1. Discussion of City fees – Bob Farmer, City Attorney, said that one motion could be made to approve all these fees if desired.

  1. Municipal Court – Raising from $51.00 to $76.50 (Approval of Charter Ordinance if approved) – With State of Kansas applicable fees the courts costs would be $100.00 total

  1. Aquatic Center – Pool Parties – From $100 to $150 per hour

  1. Buck Run Community Center

Small meeting room – From $15 to $25 for three hours

Large meeting room – From $15 to $35 for three hours

  1. Airport – Hangar Spot Rental – From $70 to $75

Overnight Transient Storage Fee – Single $10 – Twin $20

After Hours Service Fee – $25.00

Hangar #1 – Increase from $70.00 monthly to $100.00 monthly

Hangar #2 – Increase from $200.00 monthly to $300.00 monthly

  1. Dog Redemption Fee – Increase from $7.00 to $10.00

J. Jones asked about the hangar fees as he thought it had been approved at the previous meeting.

Susan said that not all of the airport fee increases were included that their Advisory Board had recommended, and she thought if it was all put together again it would make more sense.

R. Nichols moved to approve the increases as shown above. L. Watts seconded. All voted aye.

APPROVED CHARTER ORDINANCE NO. 33 REPEALING CHARTER ORDINANCE NO. 28 OF THE CITY OF FORT SCOTT, KANSAS AND EXEMPTING THE CITY OF FORT SCOTT, KANSAS FROM K.S.A. 12-4112, PROVIDINMG SUBSTITUTE AND ADDITIONAL PROVISIONS ON THE SAME SUBJECT, AND AUTHORIZING THE ASSESSMENMT OF COURT COSTS IN CASES HEARD IN MUNICIPAL COURT OF THE CITY OF FORT SCOTT, KANSAS – RAISES COURT COSTS FROM $51.00 TO $76.50.

Aquatic Center – Pool Parties – From $100 to $150 per hour.

Buck Run Community Center

Small meeting room – From $15 to $25 for three hours

Large meeting room – From $15 to $35 for three hours

Airport – Hangar Spot Rental – From $70 to $75

Overnight Transient Storage Fee – Single $10 – Twin $20

After Hours Service Fee – $25.00

Hangar #1 – Increase from $70.00 monthly to $100.00 monthly

Hangar #2 – Increase from $200.00 monthly to $300.00 monthly

Dog Redemption Fee – Increase from $7.00 to $10.00

(The Commission went back and voted on the Dispatch Lease Agreement – see vote above under Item #5).

  1. Discussion &/or consideration of two contracts with Earle’s Engineering: City Manager introduced Peter Earles of Earles Engineering.

City Engineering Fees;

Mr. Earles said that he has been in busines about 40 years. They listed the items that they do. They work with cities on many items. They can also help with a water rate study. This contract is for one year at a cost of $4,000.00 per month.

J. Jones asked if the water rate study would be above his monthly rate.

Peter said yes.

Peter Earles said that the City would always get a detailed invoice from their firm. They do not charge for driving time from Pittsburg to Fort Scott. Dave Blessant would be the Project Manager for the City. He is very familiar with Fort Scott.

Public Works Project Manager – City Manager said that the Project Manager would be for a maximum of 4 hours per week at a cost of $85.00 per hour or $340.00 a week for a maximum of $17,680.00 per year.

L. Watts moved to appoint Earles Engineering, Inc. as the City’s engineering firm and as the Public Works Project Manager, R. Nichols seconded. All voted aye.

APPROVED TO APPOINT EARLES ENGINEERNG, INC. AS THE CITY’S ENGINEERING FIRM AND AS THE PUBLIC WORKS PROJECT MANAGER.

  1. Discussion &/or consideration to award emergency bid of mill and overlay on National from 13th Street to Highway 69 – City Manager informed the Commission that he had a meeting with K.D.O.T. prior to them starting the mill and overlay project here in town. K.D.O.T. informed them that they could piggyback on this project if the City had a desired project in town. He reached out to Bettis Asphalt Company and asked them to give the City a quote. This quote is for $116,350.50. This would cover from 13th and National to Highway 69. He asked them to consider approving this on an emergency basis. The money has to come from somewhere and may affect a street they had selected to be worked on this year if this project is done.

K. Allen said that we will end up with 500 to 700 tons of millings that we can use throughout the City.

P. Allen asked about striping.

Jeremy said that was not included in the bid.

Discussion was held regarding using City equipment and letting the contractor use their own equipment. It was determined to let them use their own equipment.

Discussion was held if Bettis Asphalt could also repair the two blocks on Horton Street. City Manager said that he has asked for a quote from them.

City Manager asked Susan to share the news she discovered today with the Commission.

Susan said that one of her employees discovered a deposit had been made into the City’s account from K.D.O.T. in the amount of $211,000. She found out that it was a K.D.O.T. deposit from an old project on National. She thinks that the federal exchange dollars was finally received as permits were finalized. These funds have to be used for streets.

City Manager said that this could be used for the two blocks on Horton Street.

J. Jones asked if we need to recommend to them to get a performance and payment bond.

City Attorney said absolutely.

City Manager said that the overlay wouldn’t be done until June.

L. Watts moved to approve the quote from Bettis Asphalt in the amount of $116,350.50 to mill and overlay 13th and National to Highway 69. R. Nichols seconded. All voted aye.

APPROVED THE QUOTE FROM BETTIS ASPHALT IN THE AMOUNT OF $116,350.50 TO MILL AND OVERLAY 13TH AND NATIONAL TO HIGHWAY 69 ON AN EMERGENCY BASIS.

Reports and Comments:

  1. Commissioner Reports and Comments:

L. Watts – Said that she will not be here physically for the next couple of months for the meetings but will be connecting by Zoom and still be participating.

R. Nichols – Said that he knows that budget sessions will be starting soon. He is still focused on the comprehensive plan in terms of strategic plans and economic development and wants to make sure we have funding for those resources also. He would like to be more educated on this. We need to look at all our options.

Thanked the City Clerk for all she does for them.

P. Allen – Said that he was proud that we have an engineer on staff now.

He is going to read what he wrote: He termed it a resolution regarding sanitary sewers, manholes, and funding. He believes it should be the number one priority for the City of Fort Scott to conduct a study of the sanitary sewer collection system by the new engineering firm. He would like a $2,000,000 budget set aside for this.

He believes the study is crucial to the welfare of our City.

City Attorney said that he respects Pete’s comments, but he takes exception and to let there be no question that the City of Fort Scott admits that we are in violation of any State or Federal law. This is Pete’s opinion. If someone wanted to make a case, they could say that he admitted it. No admission by this public body was done here tonight.

City Manager asked if he should be discussing this issue with our engineering firm since he is the only Commissioner to bring this forward.

L. Watts said that we know we only have so many dollars that go around. We need to address the problems of the City.

Peter Earles said that a rate study needs completed first.

K. Allen – Said that the street on 12th Street by 5 Corners is starting to have potholes where the concrete has separated. He asked Jeremy to have someone go and look at it.

North National by bridge – Kevin said that there are potholes north of the North National bridge due to the cattle trucks turning in this area. He asked that Jeremy have the City check this out also. Jeremy said that he met with Paul Ballou who showed him some of those holes also. They have been filled with gravel but probably need a more permanent fix.

Cooper Street – He would like to see Earles get to Cooper Street and get started on this project.

Jeremy said that he is meeting with Evergy tomorrow on this also.

Kevin welcomed Bob Farmer back to the City Attorney position.

J. Jones – Nothing to report.

City Attorney Report and Comments: Nothing to report.

Adjournment:

K. Allen moved to adjourn the meeting at 8:30 p.m. L. Watts seconded. All voted aye.

ADJOURNED MEETING AT 8:30 P.M.

Respectfully submitted,

Diane K. Clay, MMC

City Clerk

Bourbon County Commission Agenda for April 20

Agenda

Bourbon County Commission Room

1st Floor, County Courthouse

210 S. National Avenue

Fort Scott, KS 66701

Tuesdays starting at 9:00

 

Date: April 20, 2021

 

1st District-Lynne Oharah                                                                Minutes: Approved: _______________

2nd District-Jim Harris                                                                      Corrected: _______________________

3rd District-Clifton Beth                                                                              Adjourned at: _______________

County Clerk-Kendell Mason

 

   

    MEETING WILL BE HELD IN THE COMMISSION ROOM.  ANYONE ATTENDING THE MEETING         WILL BE REQUIRED TO WEAR A MASK.  MUST MAINTAIN SOCIAL DISTANCING.

 

Call to Order

   

    • Flag Salute
    • Approval of Minutes from previous meeting
    • Eric Bailey – Road and Bridge Report
    • SEK Multi-County Health Dept – Rebecca Johnson
    • Scott Shelton-Variance on County Sanitation Code
    • Tri-Valley
    • Elected Officials Comment
    • County Counselor Comment
    • Public Comment
  • Commission Comment

Justifications for Executive Session:

          KSA 75-4319(b)(1) To discuss personnel matters of individual nonelected personnel to protect their privacy

          KSA 75-4319(b)(2) For consultation with an attorney for the public body or agency which would be deemed privileged in the attorney-client relationship

          KSA 75-4319(b)(3) To discuss matters relating to employer-employee negotiations whether or not in consultation with the representative(s) of the body or agency

          KSA 75-4319(b)(4) To discuss data relating to financial affairs or trade secrets of corporations, partnerships, trust, and individual proprietorships

          KSA 75-4319(b)(6) For the preliminary discussion of the acquisition of real property

          KSA 75-4319(b)(12) To discuss matters relating to security measures, if the discussion of such matters at an open meeting would jeopardize such security measures.

Governor Signs 10 Bipartisan Bills

Governor Laura Kelly Signs Several Pieces of Bipartisan Legislation

TOPEKA – Governor Laura Kelly today signed several bipartisan bills that will implement meaningful changes for Kansans, communities, and businesses.

House Bill 2071

HB 2071, as amended, would amend the definition of the crime of stalking to include intentionally engaging in a course of conduct targeted at a specific child under the age of 14 that would cause a reasonable person in the circumstances of the targeted child, or a reasonable person in the circumstances of an immediate family member of such child, to fear for such child’s safety.

House Bill 2085

HB 2085 creates the Students’ Right to Know Act, which requires the Kansas State Department of Education (KSDE) to ensure the distribution, electronic or otherwise, of certain information to all students in grades 7 through 12. Information to be distributed will include:

  • The State Board of Regents degree prospectus information;
  • The placement and salary report of the Kansas Training Information Program;
    and
  • Any other information relevant to students’ understanding of potential earnings as determined by the Department of Labor and each branch of the armed services of the U.S. military.

The bill also authorizes KSDE to enter into memorandums of understanding and other agreements with state agencies or other entities as needed to accomplish this task.

House Bill 2101

HB 2101 extends the current transfer of the first $10.5 million credited to the Expanded Lottery Act Revenues Fund (ELARF) from ELARF to the Kan-grow Engineering Fund – KU, the Kan-grow Engineering Fund – KSU, and the Kan-grow Engineering Fund – WSU with each fund receiving equal amounts of $3.5 million in each fiscal year, for FY 2023 through FY 2032. The transfer first occurred in FY 2013 and is currently scheduled to end with the transfer in FY 2022.

House Bill 2165

HB 2165, as amended, would amend the definition of an antique vehicle for purposes of vehicle registration.

House Bill 2167

HB 2167, as amended, would add two exceptions to law requiring a license plate to be attached to the rear of a motor vehicle. The bill would allow concrete mixer trucks the option to display a license plate on the front of the vehicle rather than on the rear of the vehicle and would require a dump truck with a gross weight of 26,000 pounds or more to display a license plate on the front of the vehicle. The requirement for a dump truck to display a license plate on the front of the vehicle would not apply to a vehicle registered as a farm truck.

House Bill 2245

HB 2245, as amended, would add law authorizing the Division of Vehicles (Division), Department of Revenue, to collect emergency contact information and would provide for the use of such information by law enforcement agencies.

House Bill 2247

HB 2247, as amended, would designate portions of highway in Johnson, Marshall, and Norton counties as memorial highways and would designate certain bridges in Cowley, Riley, and Seward counties as memorial bridges.

House Bill 2379

HB 2379 enacts the Peer-to-Peer (P2P) Vehicle Sharing Program Act.

Senate Bill 16

SB 16 would amend statutes to remove requirements that the following reports and certifications be provided to the Legislative Division of Post Audit (LPA), the Post Auditor, or the Legislative Post Audit Committee.

Senate Bill 89

SB 89, as amended, would amend law on securing loads on vehicles to create an exemption for trucks, trailers, or semitrailers when hauling agricultural forage commodities intrastate from the place of production to a market or place of storage or from a place of storage to a place of use. The bill would state this exemption would not apply to trucks, trailers, or semitrailers hauling hay bales or other packaged or bundled forage commodities. Continuing law requires securing a load on a vehicle so as to prevent any of this load from dropping, sifting, leaking, or otherwise escaping.

Governor Vetoes Senate Bill 50

Governor Laura Kelly Remains Committed to Fiscal Responsibility, Vetoes Senate Bill 50

TOPEKA – The following message is from Governor Laura Kelly regarding her veto of Senate Bill 50:

“Last year, despite COVID-19, Kansas experienced a record-setting $2.5 billion in new investment from businesses. These companies chose to make Kansas home in large part due to the state’s recent investments in our economic development tools, prioritizing funding for infrastructure improvements, and reinvesting in our students.

“As many of you with whom I served well remember, in order to provide sustainable funding for essential government services, we cannot return to the era of perennial, self-inflicted budget crises that undermine the very fabric and foundation of our state.”

“Therefore, under Article 2, Section 14(a) of the Constitution, I hereby veto Senate Bill 50.”

Fort Scott News

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