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Jackie Sellers: Senior Services and Taxi, Too

Jackie Sellers sits in her office at the Bourbon County Senior Citizens Center, 26 N. Main.

Jackie Sellers is the site manager for the Bourbon County Senior Citizens Center, 26 N. Main. The center is the hub of many services that are provided to seniors in the community.

 

Her jobs entail food distribution for Meals On Wheels, a Kansas Food Bank Senior Food Program, food commodities distribution and a monthly potluck for people with disabilities in the community.

 

Another venture, housed at the site, is providing public transportation service to the community.

 

Taxi

 

Sellers coordinates rides for Old Fort Transportation, a local taxi service.

 

The hours for Old Fort Transportation are 6 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. To secure a ride call 223-0750.

 

She said there are five employees that drive the vans that are part of the transportation fleet.

 

“We provide 900-1,000 rides a month,” she said. Rides to go to a job, or the doctor or shopping. “It’s been a busy year, we are looking good.”

 

“We will provide out of town runs,” Sellers said. “We do have drivers for that, with 24 hours notice.”

 

Old Fort Transportation has even occasionally provided rides home from the emergency room when people are dismissed after hours.

 

Sellers was co-host of the Jan. 16 Fort Scott Chamber of Commerce Coffee with Fort Scott Compassion Ministries, who have an office in the center.

 

At the coffee, Fort Scott City Manager Dave Martin told Sellers that he appreciates her for keeping the taxi service going.

 

Food

 

The Southeast Kansas Area Agency on Aging Senior Nutrition Program, also known as Meals on Wheels, is delivered through the Bourbon County Senior Citizens, with Sellers coordinating.

 

Sellers provides drivers for 54 senior citizens who receive home delivery of a hot meal.

 

Four people receive frozen meals through the program, she said.

 

“If you are on the route of the driver coming from Pittsburg, you get hot meals,” Sellers said. “If you are not on the route, you get frozen meals.”

 

“Volunteers dish up the food and deliver the meals,” she said.

 

Once a month, Sellers also coordinates food commodities distribution.

 

“It is income-based,” she said. “They come in once a month on the fourth Thursday to 26 N. Main. They can come on that day and we can sign them up.”

 

“We serve about 120 households a month,” Sellers said.

 

In addition, about 78 people receive a box of food from the Kansas Food Bank’s Senior Food Program, she said. This distribution is the fourth Friday of each month.

 

“Come in and pick up an application, mail it to Wichita,” she said. “If the application is in at the beginning of the month, they can get the box that month.”

 

Included in the box: meat, vegetables, fruit, shelf-milk, cereal, juice, a loaf of cheese.

 

“This is income-based and age-based,” Sellers said. “You have to be 60 years plus.”

 

There is also a potluck on the second Friday in partnership with Resource Center for Independent Living, for those with disabilities.

“If you know someone who could use help, they can help,” she said.

 

Jackie Sellers, site manager at Bourbon County Senior Citizens center, places a quart of milk in a cooler to deliver with Meals on Wheels lunches.

Allen Schellack: Compassionate Support

Allen Schellack, ministry coordinator for Fort Scott Compassionate Ministries at his office upstairs at 26 N. Main.

Allen Schellack wears many hats, all of them serving his community in some way.

He coordinates Fort Scott Compassionate Ministries(FSCM), Bourbon County Salvation Army,  and Care Portal.

Schellack is also a part of the Fort Scott Ministerial Alliance. He attends the Fort Scott Church of the Nazarene.

“I don’t know how to say ‘no’,” Schellack told the Fort Scott Chamber of Commerce Coffee attendees on Jan. 16. FSCM hosted the coffee on that day along with the Senior Citizens Center.

“My wife bought me a ‘no’ button,” he said with a smile.

But it doesn’t seem to be working.

“Compassion is an important part of what we do,” Shellack said. “We are looking at how to be more effective in the community.”

“Our biggest need in the community is freedom from drugs and alcohol,  and respect for each other and themselves,” he said.

“I can pray and give caring support or a place to encourage you that you are worth something,” he said.

His office, where he coordinates all the ministries, is upstairs at the Senior Citizens Center, 26 N. Main.

Bourbon County Senior Citizens Center, 26 N. Main.

From here he oversees assistance to foster families, homeless individuals, and services through the other community partnerships.

FSCM teamed with CarePortal, an online church engagement tool that connects the child welfare workers to churches. The portal makes churches aware of needs and gives the opportunity to respond to those needs. There are about six churches in Bourbon County who help in this way.

He also provides services to homeless people, along with hygienic supplies, phone access and fellowship.

Last year, the ministry also helped with needed supplies to students and assisted families at Christmas time.

FSCM is the designated Salvation Army Disaster Relief and Services Extension Unit for Bourbon County.

This is where the annual  Salvation Army bell-ringing fundraiser comes into play that Schellack coordinates.

At the Jan. 16 Fort Scott Chamber of Commerce Coffee, Schellack thanked all those who volunteered at Christmas, ringing the bells for the Salvation Army.

“We didn’t meet our goal but did raise over $7,000 to help the community for crisis times,” he said. Through SA, he can provide disaster relief assistance, rental/utility assistance, prescriptions, temporary lodging, gasoline for work or doctor, eyeglass help and other unspecified needs on a case by case basis.

The Fort Scott Ministerial Alliance gathers once a month and they have a hospitality fund that helps transients who are “stuck here in town, we help them get on their way,” he said.

Fort Scott City Manager Dave Martin, a coffee attendee,  thanked Schellack for all the services he provides the community.

FSCM is a volunteer organization, with no paid staff. The services are provided through local churches and community partners.

Schellack can be reached at 620.223.2212.

Fort Scott Compassionate Ministries, located above the Senior Citizens Center on North Main Street.

 

 

 

 

The Offices: Starting a Small Business Turn-Key

The Offices, a set of offices being developed by Legweak LLC.
Jeff and Jamie Armstrong have put resources of time and money into The Offices, located at 1711-1715 S. National Avenue. (Just north of Subway Restaurant.)
Jeff and Jamie Armstrong stand in front of the property they developed into business suites. Submitted photo.

Recently, they signed on their first renter in the development.

 

“We cater to small businesses that need a turn-key solution without the overhead of their own storefront,” Jamie Armstrong said.
“We created this space to help attract and grow small businesses in a community we dearly love,” she said.  “It is difficult to find professional space that’s affordable with great visibility when you are getting started or growing into a new market.”
The Armstrong’s have worked in the last few months to build the offices, which were created to fit the need of the renter.
“We hope that by adapting size and scale, we have brought to a rural market like Fort Scott, a small business concept that has been wildly popular in urban markets,” Armstrong said.

The first business moving into The Offices building is Mag-Lab of Pittsburg. This business offers medical lab services to the community.

 

Brian Holt, Mag-Lab medical technologist and Sharon Newell, phlebotomist, stand in the lobby of The Offices, where the new Mag-Lab is located. There are six offices available in this section of the buildings. A common lobby, restroom, and kitchen area are shared among the renters.

 

“They open up February 3rd,” Armstrong said.  ” We have five remaining units available for lease.”

 

” Our amenities include private, pre-wired 10’x12’ office with on-site storage, virtual receptionist, common area cleaning service, and all utilities included for one flat monthly cost. We offer flexible lease terms that start at $500/mo. We would be the perfect option for a satellite law practice, CPA, medical practitioner, a work-from-home business and many, many others.”

 

The common kitchenette area of The Offices, 1711 S. National.

 

The restroom has wheelchair accessibility at The Offices.

 

The name of the development business that the Armstrong’s started is Legweak,LLC. For more information: 620-224-3036.

See their Facebook page at Legweak Properties

Fort Scott Chamber: Encouraging Businesses

Lindsay Madison is the Fort Scott Chamber of Commerce Executive Director.

The Fort Scott Area Chamber of Commerce has been working to encourage entrepreneurship and matching skills to local employers’ needs in 2019, according to information provided during the Jan. 9 Chamber coffee.

Chamber of Commerce and Visitors Center, 321 E. Wall

Two new programs were added to the community this year: Bourbon County E-Community and Work Ready Community. The focus of the two is enhancing local economic development through entrepreneurship and workforce development.

Loans for Businesses Through Entrepreneur Community

Bourbon County E-Community provides access to funds, which are locally administered through the Chamber. These loans included start-up businesses as well as existing business purchases or expenses. The funds are accessed through NetWork Kansas, whose mission statement is to promote an entrepreneurial environment throughout the state that connects entrepreneurs and small business owners with expertise, education, and economic resources.

Those who have received these loans in Fort Scott from July 1 to Dec. 31:

Smallville Crossfit, an E-Community Loan of $40,000.

Luther’s BBQ, an E-Community Loan of $45,000.

Smallville Crossfit, a start-up loan of $25,000.

Lulther’s BBQ, a start-up loan of $30,000.

Margo’s LLC (a salon and spa), an E-Community Load of $39,000.

Other events in support of E-Community: a luncheon to educate on the loan program, an entrepreneur appreciation luncheon, a semi-monthly local newspaper ad promoting the loans, and planning for a Youth Entrepreneurship Challenge, in partnership with Fort Scott High School (judging for the challenge will be March 11, 2020.)

 

Work Ready Community

Work Ready Community is a nation-wide program to aid matching people to a job that needs their skills and preparing people to have the skills that employers need.

Work Ready Communities is working at the grassroots level to make the country more competitive and closing the skills gap that threatens to paralyze the U.S. economy, according to its website. They do this by providing a community-based framework.

To learn more: /https://www.workreadycommunities.org/

Bourbon County became a Work Ready Community in Sept. 2019.

A group of 10 people from Bourbon County, USD 234, USD235, Fort Scott Community College, the City of Uniontown and local employers attended a Work Ready Community Workshop in August 2019.

Kansas initiated an initiative for high school juniors to take the Work Keys test and earn certification. The certification is to improve hiring and employee retention, help provide employees who have the skills needed and help students attain success in landing a career.

 

To view the Chamber leadership this year,click below:

http://fortscott.com/board-of-directors

To see the Chamber sponsored events, view the flyer below:

https://chambermaster.blob.core.windows.net/userfiles/UserFiles/chambers/2874/CMS/2019-Year-in-Review—Chamber.pdf

 

To join the Chamber, click here:

http://fortscott.com/join-the-chamber

 

 

 

 

 

Not Complaining, Doing Acts of Service

 

Ground cover materials and repair of some of the children’s playground equipment were part of the workday in December.

Some local citizens have decided not to complain about issues, but instead to work on solutions.

 

Citizens For Park Improvements is the name of a group of local citizens who had been working in Gunn Park to improve the children’s areas.

Saw the need, took action

“The weekend before I started the group, we were at the park for a church function,” Seth Needham said. ” My youngest wanted to swing, but he couldn’t because the swings were broke. Even if the swings weren’t broke, the surface was muddy, and the whole area was unsafe. The swings that weren’t broke were 28 inches off the ground, which isn’t safe for a toddler. So, I decided to take action.”

” I have 2 sons, and I want the park to be a fun place for them.”

New ground cover under the teeter-totter makes it safer for children. The materials were provided by members of the Citizens For Park Improvements.

“It is something that had been on my mind for quite some time,” Needham said. ” I love our parks. I love taking my sons to our parks. But our parks need a lot of work. As I parent who frequents the parks, I see a lot of the issues. And I wasn’t seeing those issues being addressed. Things like a teeter-totter that was 40 inches off the ground, which was dangerous for my sons. Or slides that my two-year-old couldn’t go down because they had huge drop-offs at the bottom. Swing sets that were in disrepair. Ground covering that is non-existent.  I realized I had two choices; gripe and complain on Facebook, or take action. I chose the second.”

“We have good parks,” he said.  “But we have the basis for GREAT parks. And that’s what I want. I want to see Gunn Park be a wonderful safe place for families. I believe our parks department is doing a great job, but it sounds like they are overwhelmed sometimes just trying to keep up with the day-to-day operations. I figured if I could organize a group of people to help with some of the small stuff, the park department might have more time to focus on the larger issues.”

Started November 2019: More Projects In Spring

Needham started the project on November 6.

“I figured a few people might join and help, but I never expected it to take off like this. We have had one meeting, are already drawing up plans for our first six projects. We had our first workday, and got several projects done.”

Upcoming projects planned for this spring include updating bathrooms, repairing playground equipment, new ground cover for playgrounds, “and also some bigger projects which will really add to Gunn Park,” Needham said.  “We have people looking into funding options, have set-up a material registry with Big-Sugar Lumber, and have experts looking into things such as drainage. And there is so much more that is going on.”

Currently, there is a project to clear off the Bell Town Park Trail on the north end of town, being organized by Denise Findley Needham.

 

New ground cover materials were placed under the swing sets at Gunn Park by the citizen’s group.

 

“Right now there are around 500 people in the group, and it’s growing daily,” he said. “We have a good group of people with fresh ideas, and the will to make it happen. One of my goals from the beginning was to make the group accessible to anyone. I want anyone who wants to help to have the opportunity, regardless of age, income, physical health, or time. I’m trying hard to organize the group where someone who has to work weekends can still contribute if they want to. Or the person who has $10 leftover after pay-day, but still wants to help. There will be a place for them. Or maybe someone who is older or disabled and can’t get out there and do physical labor…. We can use them too.”

Leadership

” We have never really decided on leadership,” he said.  “I guess right now, I’m it. There have been several individuals who have really stepped up… and I couldn’t have done it without them. So if that qualifies as a leader, I would have to say Craig Campbell, Deb McCoy, Josh Jones, Beth Nuss, Lindsay Madison, Susan Bancroft, and Chad Brown so far. As projects come up, I am sure we’ll see more people step up to the plate when they see a need for something they are great at.

 

Social media is helping the organization

“I organized it through Facebook to make it easier for people. Let’s face it, people are busy. It’s hard to attend traditional meetings. But by organizing it online, people can contribute on THEIR schedule. Ideas can be exchanged easily. We can set-up events so that people can see what we need, when we are working, and how they can help.”

To view the group’s page:

https://www.facebook.com/search/top/?q=Citizens%20for%20Park%20improvemnts&epa=SEARCH_BOX

 

If anyone wants to be involved, they just need to join our Facebook group,” Needham said.  “In the group, we post ideas and solutions we are working on, workdays, and how people can help.”

 

CHC/SEK: Not Possible To Pursue Mercy Building Repurpose

The Community Health Center of Southeast Kansas (CHC/SEK) Board of Directors took no action today toward establishing a “medical mall” within the former Fort Scott Mercy Hospital. Prior to finalizing plans for the construction of a new primary care clinic, CHC/SEK had spent the past month assessing the feasibility of remaining in the existing building.

 

“It was our goal,” said CHC/SEK CEO Krista Postai, “to see if we could recruit enough occupants to cover the cost of repurposing the former hospital built in 2002 at the cost of $30 million.”

 

“After analyzing costs over the last year and projecting expenses if the building’s space was fully utilized, we estimated that we would need about $800,000 to $1 million annually to cover utilities and maintenance plus the staff to keep the building maintained and fully operational,” said Postai, adding the bulk of that expense would have to be covered by CHC/SEK and Ascension/Via Christi who together would occupy a large percentage of the overall building.

 

CHC/SEK staff met with multiple people and organizations to discuss their interest including officials from Fort Scott Community College who identified opportunities for space for their nursing department, as well as additional dormitory space. We were especially appreciative of the Bourbon County Commission who had pledged “in-kind” support to take care of mowing, snow removal, etc., as well as the Mercy Health System who had tentatively committed funds for needed and future repairs.

 

“Altogether, we had tentative commitments from about a half dozen interested in being a part of the project which covered about 100,000 sq. ft. of the 125,000 sq. ft. of available space,” said Postai, who explained the entire building is 177,000 sq. ft. but about 50,000 sq. ft. is dedicated to mechanical space that supports the overall building operations.

 

“That was assuming Ascension/Via Christi remained in the existing ER and Diagnostic Imaging area, and we continued to occupy the clinic space plus the pharmacy,” she said.

 

“Unfortunately, we were notified Wednesday that after analyzing their options, Ascension/Via Christi had determined to remain in the existing building on a permanent basis was cost-prohibitive, and it was more fiscally prudent to build a new ER,” said Postai.

 

“We were told the existing ER space would need about $3 million in renovations and that, plus a lease payment adequate to cover the cost of their share of the facility, would make it far more expensive than a new facility,” said Postai. The CHC/SEK Board was prepared to make a go/no go decision at their Board meeting Thursday but after learning that Ascension/Via Christi was moving forward on their own construction, the board determined it was not possible to pursue this project without them.

 

“We all have to make hard decisions about what is best for our organizations and, unfortunately, we all have limited funds and have to maximize our capital investments,” said Postai adding that both organizations remain committed to providing services in Ft. Scott.

 

Both CHC/SEK and Ascension/Via Christi had already started designing new facilities on the existing campus and will proceed on, said Postai explaining CHC/SEK was planning a 25,000 sq. ft. to 30,000 sq. ft. facility facing Horton Street at an estimated cost of about $5 million.

Sheriff Martin On Recent Raises in Bourbon County

Bourbon County Sheriff Bill Martin. Submitted photo.

Bourbon County Sheriff Bill Martin is unhappy with the raises of administrative county employees, he said. He would have preferred giving input into raises in his office, including the one given him by the Bourbon County Commissioners.

A raise for elected officials became effective Dec. 15, 2019, according, to Bourbon County Commission minutes. This raised the clerk and treasurer’s salary to $47,248 annually, the register of deeds to 44,821 and the sheriff’s salary to $60,000.

Martin said in his budget request he had asked for a three-percent raise for all his employees.

“I did not request that large amount” for the sheriff’s position, he said.

There were no across-the-board raises given by the commission.

Martin said he was not aware of any raises until he received an email from Bourbon County Clerk Kendall Mason on Dec. 18, 2019.

At no other time was any raise amount ever discussed with me by the commission, not for myself or any member of my staff,” Martin said. ” I attended several commission meetings where I questioned the commission on budget figures for 2020 and, as usual, I was not ever given any answers.  At no time after I submitted my 2020 budget did anyone on the commission engage myself or my jail administration in salary discussions.”

In 2015 Martin had paid for a wage comparison survey and presented it to that Bourbon County Commission because he wanted to bring the salaries of the county employees as a whole up to standard amounts.

He felt it fell on “deaf ears” at the time, he said. It was a different set of commissioners.

For the 2020 Sheriff’s Office budget he had requested a three percent raise for his employees.

Instead, Martin’s salary was raised from $45,000 to $60,000.

He contends that discussions with him and his staff would have been beneficial to the decision making process.

“I am never provided with verbal information or written information as to where the money is put, cut or moved to in the budgets,” Martin said. “My door is always open for any discussion.”

Martin has two salaried employees.

“One of the two fell below the new income guideline set by the Federal Wage Law and the US Department of Labor,” Martin said.  “A captain at the correctional center fell under this ‘salaried employee category’ and therefore is required by law to have a salary increase.  If this wage increase is not performed, this employee would be eligible for overtime.  I can assure you that increasing this wage is far less harmful than allowing this employee to request overtime hours for all the overtime he works.  I am still unaware if this salary increase has been added to the correctional center budget.  The commission was made aware of this federal law… several months ago.”

Martin said the responsibility of the sheriff’s office falls to him.

“I am the face and the buck stops with me, so to speak, but they are the men and women with their lives on the line every, single day and every single night.  Christmas, Easter, Monday through Sunday.   They sign up to make a difference in their community where they live. It’s nice to be thanked and appreciated and compensated to prove yourself worthy.”

 

“Top-Heavy”

The county has two many administrative positions, Martin said.

“Our county is now so top-heavy with administration that the people in the offices and on the road and doing the jobs are unable to receive any fair raises and are far from a competitive wage for the jobs they are doing,” Martin said. “Our county has a road and bridge supervisor that makes over $60,880 a year plus benefits.  This county has a part-time, county counselor who makes $64,000 a year for 25 hours a week and has a private practice on the side; this is in addition to the county attorney who makes $50,000 a year.  This county now pays (not attacking the person) an economic development director… $70,000 a year plus benefits. As of January 1, we have a sheriff making $60,000., a county clerk, making $47,248 a treasurer making that same amount and a register of deeds making $44,821…We have three county commissioners who make $21,416 (each) per year plus benefits, which is another $64,248 plus benefits in a year.”

” I have been requesting additional deputies every year since I have taken office and every year, I am told that there is no money to spend,  budgets are close, overspending and overtime are out of control,” Martin said. “Yet, we have almost $200,000 in salaries for administrative staff, who hold jobs that should be performed by our road and bridge director and crews, the elected county clerk, our elected county attorney, and our elected county commission.  $200,000 would pay for other staff raises, staff who are on the ground working.” 

“It would pay for a much-needed school resource officer for Uniontown Schools plus a courthouse security officer, which is mandated by the state,” he said.  “I cannot get anyone to understand that when you pay a deputy a $35,000 a year salary, you are better off to hire two more deputies on the force and reducing the $60,000 in overtime pay.  I am contending that if they would not have raised my pay $15,000, they could have very easily allowed me to hire one new deputy and they would have been ahead money.  Where did all this money come from and how do we put these jobs back in the hands of the people who were elected to do them and eliminate all the huge salaries that we are paying right now.”     

The sheriff’s office operates around the clock much like an ambulance service or hospital does, he said.   And some of his employees are struggling financially.

“People do a great job for great pay,” Martin said.  “People do a decent job for decent pay and proud people show up to work to draw a wage rather than go on welfare.  Some of my employees can claim state insurance benefits for their families and that is shameful to think that we cannot provide a wage above the poverty level… I also have other employees who work two and three jobs and I cannot control what my employees do outside their duty time… during my time as a deputy, I worked three jobs to provide for my family and pay my bills.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHC/SEK: Not Possible to Pursue Mercy Building Repurpose

The Community Health Center of Southeast Kansas (CHC/SEK) Board of Directors took no action today toward establishing a “medical mall” within the former Fort Scott Mercy Hospital. Prior to finalizing plans for the construction of a new primary care clinic, CHC/SEK had spent the past month assessing the feasibility of remaining in the existing building.

 

“It was our goal,” said CHC/SEK CEO Krista Postai, “to see if we could recruit enough occupants to cover the cost of repurposing the former hospital built in 2002 at the cost of $30 million.”

 

“After analyzing costs over the last year and projecting expenses if the building’s space was fully utilized, we estimated that we would need about $800,000 to $1 million annually to cover utilities and maintenance plus the staff to keep the building maintained and fully operational,” said Postai, adding the bulk of that expense would have to be covered by CHC/SEK and Ascension/Via Christi who together would occupy a large percentage of the overall building.

 

CHC/SEK staff met with multiple people and organizations to discuss their interest including officials from Fort Scott Community College who identified opportunities for space for their nursing department, as well as additional dormitory space. We were especially appreciative of the Bourbon County Commission who had pledged “in-kind” support to take care of mowing, snow removal, etc., as well as the Mercy Health System who had tentatively committed funds for needed and future repairs.

 

“Altogether, we had tentative commitments from about a half dozen interested in being a part of the project which covered about 100,000 sq. ft. of the 125,000 sq. ft. of available space,” said Postai, who explained the entire building is 177,000 sq. ft. but about 50,000 sq. ft. is dedicated to mechanical space that supports the overall building operations.

 

“That was assuming Ascension/Via Christi remained in the existing ER and Diagnostic Imaging area, and we continued to occupy the clinic space plus the pharmacy,” she said.

 

“Unfortunately, we were notified Wednesday that after analyzing their options, Ascension/Via Christi had determined to remain in the existing building on a permanent basis was cost-prohibitive, and it was more fiscally prudent to build a new ER,” said Postai.

 

“We were told the existing ER space would need about $3 million in renovations and that, plus a lease payment adequate to cover the cost of their share of the facility, would make it far more expensive than a new facility,” said Postai. The CHC/SEK Board was prepared to make a go/no go decision at their Board meeting Thursday but after learning that Ascension/Via Christi was moving forward on their own construction, the board determined it was not possible to pursue this project without them.

 

“We all have to make hard decisions about what is best for our organizations and, unfortunately, we all have limited funds and have to maximize our capital investments,” said Postai adding that both organizations remain committed to providing services in Ft. Scott.

 

Both CHC/SEK and Ascension/Via Christi had already started designing new facilities on the existing campus and will proceed on, said Postai explaining CHC/SEK was planning a 25,000 sq. ft. to 30,000 sq. ft. facility facing Horton Street at an estimated cost of about $5 million.

Independent Medical Laboratory Coming to Fort Scott Feb. 3

The sign in the front window of the new Mag-Lab office, tells the phone number to call for more information: 620-232-1900.

Mag-Lab, an independent medical laboratory, headquartered in Pittsburg, KS will be opening a Fort Scott satellite office on Feb. 3, 2020.

The office will be located in the building just north of Subway Restaurant at 1711 S. National, Suite C2.

Hours are 7 a.m. to noon, Monday through Friday.

For more information contact: 620-232-1900.

The Offices, a set of professional office spaces being developed by Legweak LLC.

With specimens taken that morning , the results will be delivered to the doctor that afternoon.

“Complicated testing we send off to a reference lab,” Phlebotomist Sharon Newell said.

“If it’s a body fluid, we can test it,” Newell said.

“We can have anybody out in a few minutes,” she said. “There is not a lot of paperwork hassle. You have to have a doctor’s script if going through insurance.”

Gary and Jeannie Petersen are the owners of the lab.

 

Sharon Newell, the phlebotomist, stands in the doorway of the new Mag-Lab office in Fort Scott.

When one enters the lobby of the set of offices, there is a doorbell on the wall for contacting each of the personnel in the offices.

Currently, Mag-Lab is the only renter, but two more are on the horizon.

Brian Holt, medical technologist and Sharon Newell, phlebotomist stand in the lobby of The Offices, where the new Mag-Lab is located. The doorbell for notifying that clients are in the lobby is located behind Sewell.

Dr. Elias Tawil is the medical director of the lab.