Category Archives: Uncategorized

The doctor will see you now…curbside, by phone, or onscreen 

Community Health Center of Southeast Kansas, 403 Woodland Hills Blvd.

 

The COVID-19 pandemic might be testing many aspects of the state’s public health system, but it’s also spurring innovation. 

Social distancing measures to contain the COVID-19 pandemic outbreak resulted in many people postponing or canceling non-emergency-related medical appointments. Early during the pandemic, the state created regulatory flexibility so Kansans could continue receiving necessary care in new ways, and a new era of alternate visits from curbside to telehealth became our new normal.   

In 2020 CHC/SEK saw 18,480 alternative visits across the entire health system, including a record 2,194 visits in December. The top three alternate methods patients were seen was by telephone, curbside and E-visits using video technology in smartphones, tablets and computers.   

Early in the pandemic, in a matter of days, CHC/SEK pivoted from in-clinic patient visits to alternative visits, where CHC/SEK medical providers began providing services via phone or online video chats, and curbside to fill the gap until office visits were safely possible again. Alternate visits allow a patient to schedule visits at their convenience, as they can have an E-visit from home, work or school without the need to travel. All “virtual” patients need is a strong internet signal and a smartphone, tablet or computer to connect with their medical professional. This option allows patients and providers to feel safe. 

“What we saw, especially at the beginning of the pandemic, our patients were apprehensive to come to the clinic to see their provider and as you know, chronic illness is not going to wait until COVID-19 is in the rearview mirror,” Holley Forrest, CHC/SEK director of operations said, “for us it was about making sure we stay in contact with our patients whether that was over the phone, via tele-visit or at the curb.” 

For some patients, CHC/SEK staff are the only people they come in to contact with daily, weekly or on a monthly basis. Thanks to technology, some patients who are being seen for primary care can also be given resources for non-primary care such as behavioral health. Forrest said visits such as well child checkups cannot wait as most children are at home all week now and do not have teachers or nurses to make sure they are well.  Forrest said she believes alternative visits will “absolutely” continue and is excited to see what the future holds for alternative visits.  

“I think it’s a great resource for our patients, patients with transportation issues, mobility issues,” she said, “this is a great way for us to stay connected and continue to see them and check in on them.” 

Monitoring devices can come in handy when doing an alternative visit, Forrest said. The State of Kansas agrees. The State Finance Council recently approved allocating $3 million federal coronavirus relief funding so Community Care health centers could provide monitoring devices to their patients. This telehealth project will support at least 10,000 low-income and otherwise underserved Kansans by securely connecting portable devices to records at the health centers. CHC/SEK was awarded more than $700,000 for the purchase of blood pressure monitors, glucose monitors, finger-tip pulse oximeters, thermometers and electronic scales will facilitate increased patient-provider management of COVID-19 and/or chronic conditions. 

“Implementing telehealth on this scale would have been unimaginable at the beginning of 2020,” said Community Care CEO Denise Cyzman. “The pandemic has prompted futuristic concepts to become present-day public health realities.” 

The $3 million was part of a $38.5 million package recommended by the Strengthening People and Revitalizing Kansas (SPARK) task force, which also directed funding to hospitals, local health departments and nursing homes. Another $1 million was designated to be used by state-funded community-based clinics to help offset COVID-related lost revenue and increased expenses. Also, understanding the value of maintaining healthcare through telemedicine, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) relaxed telehealth regulations and agreed to pay for virtual visits and visits that take place by telephone.

Walgreens COVID 19 Vaccinations

06 January 2021

Walgreens continues to accelerate access to COVID-19 vaccinations among additional vulnerable populations as part of state and local jurisdictions distribution plans

DEERFIELD, Ill., January 06, 2021 – Walgreens expects to complete the administration of COVID-19 vaccine first doses in skilled nursing facilities by Monday, Jan. 25. The company is also rapidly expanding access to vaccinations among assisted living facilities and additional vulnerable populations outlined by states and local jurisdictions as part of expanded distribution plans.

“Since receiving our first allotments of vaccines in late December, Walgreens has remained on track in vaccinating our most vulnerable populations, and we are steadfast in our commitment to accelerating access to COVID-19 vaccines as we receive additional guidance from state governments and jurisdictions,” said John Standley, president, Walgreens. “Walgreens takes immense pride in being a part of protecting our communities from COVID-19 and helping the country take this first step toward emerging from this pandemic.”

As part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Pharmacy Partnership for Long-Term Care Program, Walgreens began administering COVID-19 vaccines to residents and staff at long-term care facilities in late December and is now active across 49 states and Washington D.C. and Puerto Rico. Activation dates and prioritization of long-term care facilities were determined by each state. In accordance with CDC and state guidance, Walgreens provided COVID-19 vaccination clinics to skilled nursing facilities first and is expanding to assisted living and other types of facilities. The company will continue to partner with states and jurisdictions to provide vaccinations to residents and staff at 35,000 long-term care facilities that are partnering with Walgreens.

Walgreens will continue to work with states as they finalize their Phase 1b and 1c plans to administer COVID-19 vaccines to additional vulnerable populations, which may include essential workers and people ages 75 and older. COVID-19 vaccines will be available in all of Walgreens more than 9,000 store locations once they become available for mass administration. At that time, individuals will be able to schedule vaccination appointments through the Walgreens app or online.

“Walgreens pharmacy team members are embedded in communities and have more than a decade of experience providing immunizations,” said Standley. “They will continue to play a critical role in educating patients and supporting the administration of vaccines, including in rural and underserved communities.”

Walgreens is committed to driving health equity throughout the roll out of COVID-19 vaccines. Reaching underserved and rural areas is a critical component given the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 in these communities? While nearly 80 percent of the U.S. population lives within five miles of a Walgreens pharmacy, Walgreens is committed to leveraging different models, such as mobile and off-site clinics, to ensure the delivery of vaccines in underserved and rural areas. These communities have been a focus throughout the pandemic, with more than 70 percent of Walgreens COVID-19 testing sites located in socially vulnerable areas and the implementation of off-site clinics and voucher programs to ensure access to flu vaccinations in underserved areas.

About Walgreens

Walgreens (www.walgreens.com) is included in the Retail Pharmacy USA Division of Walgreens Boots Alliance, Inc. (Nasdaq: WBA), a global leader in retail and wholesale pharmacy. As America’s most loved pharmacy, health and beauty company, Walgreens purpose is to champion the health and wellbeing of every community in America. Operating more than 9,000 retail locations across America, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, Walgreens is proud to be a neighborhood health destination serving approximately 8 million customers each day. Walgreens pharmacists play a critical role in the U.S. healthcare system by providing a wide range of pharmacy and healthcare services. To best meet the needs of customers and patients, Walgreens offers a true omnichannel experience, with platforms bringing together physical and digital, supported by the latest technology to deliver high-quality products and services in local communities nationwide.

Guide to Dec 2020 COVID Relief Bill

This new version focuses on businesses with 300 or fewer employees that can demonstrate a revenue loss of 25% or more in any quarter of2020 (vs. 2019).

The Loan amount is 2.5 times the average monthly payroll; restaurant and hospitality businesses receive 3.5 times. Additional expenses qualify and simplified the forgiveness process.

PAYCHECK PROTECTION PROGRAM (PPP)

ACTION: Consult your lender

Here’s another reprise – SBA loan payments paid for you. Three additional P&I payments starting February 2021 for existing loans, 5 more months for smallest and hardest-hit businesses – capped at $9,000. New loans also eligible for the program.

 

SBA DEBT RELIEF EXTENDED

ACTION: Payments are automatic, but consult your SBA lender

GUIDE TO DEC 2020COVID RELIEF BILL
Actions You Can Take
Gig workers, self-employed and independent contractors receive extended benefits through march 14, 2021. Increased benefit period to 50 weeks.

PANDEMIC UNEMPLOYMENT ASSISTANCE

ACTION: File for unemployment:
https://www.getkansasbenefits.gov/Home.aspx

Yes, it’s back! But focused on businesses and non-profits in low-income communities. May also receive top-up to $10K on their previous EIDL Grant.

$10,000 EIDL GRANT

ACTION:   https://www.sba.gov/funding-programs/loans/coronavirus-relief-options/economic-injury-disaster-loans

Extended and expanded Employee RetentionTax Credit (ERTC)
All forgiven PPP expenses are tax-deductible
EIDL grants no longer reduce PPP forgiveness amounts
Extended payroll tax credits for paid sick &family leave
Grants for entertainment venues (live events, movie theaters, cultural institutions
$600 direct payments to taxpayers

OTHER ASSISTANCE
www.kansassbdc.net/covid19

FOR KANSAS BUSINESS OWNERS
This summary information is based upon currently available information at the time of publication and is subject to interpretation at all levels of government.

 

Resist Temptation, Don’t Lick the Spoon

Joy Miller, RD, LD
Family and Consumer Science Extension Agent
Adult Development and Aging
Family Resource Management
K-State Research and Extension
Southwind Extension District
210 S. National
Fort Scott, KS 66701
Office: 620-223-3720
Fax: 620-223-0332
joymiller@ksu.edu

As the holiday season approaches, resist the temptation to taste uncooked batter or dough, no matter how delicious it might be.

You have probably heard it’s a bad idea to eat uncooked dough because it contains raw eggs. But raw flour can also make you sick and is not safe to eat until properly cooked. Bacteria can contaminate grains in the fields or throughout the grain transportation and flour production system. Flour from milled grain is typically not treated to kill bacteria.

What about cookie dough ice cream? Commercially purchased cookie dough ice cream should be safe because it contains heat-treated flour and pasteurized eggs. Store bought cookie dough for baking, may not be the same and it is important to follow package directions when baking.

You might have licked cake batter or cookie dough from spoons lots of times with no ill effects, but some haven’t been so lucky. Food safety tips for preparing baked goods to keep your family safe this holiday season:

  • Don’t eat uncooked dough, batter, or other foods containing raw flour or eggs.
  • Cook or bake foods to proper temperatures and follow recipes or package directions.
  • As with raw meat, keep raw flour or eggs separate from ready-to-eat foods.
  • Clean bowls, utensils, countertops and other surfaces thoroughly after use.
  • Wash hands often.

More Food Safety at https://www.southwind.k-state.edu/health-nutrition/

Follow us on Facebook @southwindextensiondistrict or Instagram @southwind_ext. For more information, contact Joy Miller at joymiller@ksu.edu or by calling 620-223-3720.

FS Library Board Member Sought

Please see the following Library Board opening:

  • One opening (Must be a City resident) for the Fort Scott Library Board.

The function of the Fort Scott Library Board is to review requests in reference to the library. This Board meets monthly at 5:00 p.m. on the third Tuesday of the month.

If you have a desire to serve on this board and meet the above requirements, please submit a letter of interest to the City Clerk, Diane Clay, 123 S. Main, Fort Scott, Kansas 66701. She will then submit your letter of interest for consideration to the City Commission. All of the boards and commissions serve on a volunteer basis and are not compensated. If you would like more information on this board, please contact Diane Clay, City Clerk at 620-223-0550 or dclay@fscity.org. Please submit your letter of interest by October 30th, 2020.

Bourbon County Ballot For Nov. 3

COUNTY CLERK’S NOTICE OF CANDIDATES TO BE VOTED ON

AT THE GENERAL ELECTION NOVEMBER 3, 2020

 

State of Kansas County of Bourbon

 

In compliance with K.S.A. 25-105, and the General Election Laws of the State of Kansas, I submit herewith the list of National, State and District Candidates certified to me by the Secretary of State, and the list of those filed as candidates in Bourbon County in the forthcoming General Election to be held, Tuesday, November 3, 2020.

 

And, I hereby give further notice that the election will be held in the voting places listed below in Bourbon County, Kansas, and that the polls will be opened and closed at the regular time specified by law for the conduct of elections.  All precincts in the county will open at 7:00 am and will close at 7:00 pm.

 

Sales Tax Question on the ballot:

 

To vote in favor of any question

submitted upon the ballot, darken

the oval to the left of the word

“YES”;

to vote against it, darken

the oval to the left of the word

“NO”.

 

Shall the following be adopted?

Shall Bourbon County, Kansas,

levy (renew) a one percent

countywide retailers’ sales tax to

take effect on July 1, 2021, and

expire on June 30, 2031, with the

allocated shares pursuant to

K.S.A. 2019 Supp. 12-192 to be

used as follows: (1) to Bourbon

County, for the purpose of

maintenance and construction of

hard surface roads, and (2) to

each city located in Bourbon

County, for the purpose of

providing funding for public

services?

 

Residents living in the City of Fort Scott vote at the following locations:

1st Ward       Community Christian Church – 1919 S Horton, Fort Scott

2nd Ward       Grace Baptist Church – 502 S Margrave, Fort Scott

3rd Ward       Grace Baptist Church – 502 S Margrave, Fort Scott

4th Ward       Community Christian Church – 1919 S Horton, Fort Scott

5th Ward       Community Christian Church – 1919 S Horton, Fort Scott

6th Ward       Community Christian Church – 1919 S Horton, Fort Scott

7th Ward       Grace Baptist Church – 502 S Margrave, Fort Scott

 

Residents living out in the county vote at the following locations:

Drywood       Grace Baptist Church – 502 S Margrave, Fort Scott

Franklin        Mapleton Community Building – 565 Eldora, Mapleton, KS

Freedom      Fulton Community Building – 408 West Osage, Fulton, KS

East Marion  Uniontown City Hall – 206 Sherman Street, Uniontown, KS

West Marion Bronson Community Building – 504 Clay Street, Bronson, KS

Marmaton     Redfield City Hall – 312 N Pine, Redfield, KS

Millcreek       Redfield City Hall – 312 N Pine, Redfield, KS

Osage          Fulton Community Building – 408 West Osage, Fulton, KS

Pawnee       Redfield City Hall – 312 N Pine, Redfield, KS

North Scott   Community Christian Church – 1919 S Horton, Fort Scott

South Scott  Grace Baptist Church – 502 S Margrave, Fort Scott

Timberhill      Mapleton Community Building – 565 Eldora, Mapleton, KS

Walnut         Uniontown City Hall – 206 Sherman Street, Uniontown, KS

 

NATIONAL AND STATE OFFICES
For President and Vice-President of the United States
Joseph R. Biden / Kamala D. Harris 1209 Barley Mill Road

Wilmington, DE 19807

Democratic
Donald J. Trump / Michael R. Pence                     1100 S. Ocean Blvd.

Palm Beach, FL 33480

Republican
Jo Jorgensen / Jeremy “Spike” Cohen Greenville, SC Libertarian
For United States Senate
  Barbara Bollier 6910 Overhill Road

Mission Hills, KS 66208

Democratic
  Roger Marshall PO Box 1588

Great Bend, KS 67530

Republican
  Jason Buckley 8828 Marty Ln

Overland Park, KS 66212

Libertarian
For US House of Representatives – District 2
Michelle De La Isla 3250 SW Briarwood Dr

Topeka, KS 66611

Democratic
Jake LaTurner 2329 SW Ashworth Pl

Topeka, KS 66614

Republican
Robert Garrard 2287 N 300 Rd

Edgerton, KS 66021

Libertarian
Kansas Senate, District 12
Mike Bruner 1002 Pecan St.

Humboldt, KS 66748

Democratic
Caryn Tyson PO Box 191

Parker, KS 66072

Republican
Kansas Senate, District 13
Nancy J. Ingle 511 E. 21st

Pittsburg, KS 66762

Democratic
Richard Hilderbrand 240 Cleveland Ave

Baxter Springs, KS 66713

Republican
 Kansas House of Representatives, District 2
  Lynn D. Grant 202 S. Appleton

Frontenac, KS 66763

Democratic
  Kenneth Collins 102 E First Street

Mulberry, KS 66756

Republican
Kansas House of Representatives, District 4
  Bill Meyer 14 Golfview Drive

Fort Scott, KS 66701

Democratic
  Trevor Jacobs 1927 Locust Road

Fort Scott, KS 66701

Republican
For County Commissioner – District 2
  Jim Harris 2302 Jayhawk Rd

Fort Scott, KS 66701

Republican
For County Commissioner – District 3
  Clifton Beth 2236 215th,

Fort Scott, KS 66701

Republican
  Phillip G. Hoyt 2422 242nd Terrace

Fulton, KS 66738

Democratic
For County Clerk
  Kendell Dawn Mason 2 S Eddy

Fort Scott, KS 66701

Republican
For County Treasurer
  Patty Love 901 Shepherd St

Fort Scott, KS 66701

Republican
For Register of Deeds
  Lora Holdridge 1814 Richards Rd

Fort Scott, KS 66701

Republican
For County Attorney
  Jacqie Spradling PO Box 576

Spring Hill, KS 66083

Republican
For County Sheriff
  Mike Feagins 1964 Justice Rd

Fort Scott, KS 66701

Democratic
  Bill Martin 502 Meadow Ln

Fort Scott, KS 66701

Republican
TOWNSHIP TRUSTEE
Drywood Richard Cullison, Jr. 506 260th

Garland, KS 66741

Republican
Franklin Tony Bradbury 631 Soldier Rd.

Bronson, KS 66716

Republican
Freedom Janice Seested 2330 215th St.

Fort Scott, KS 66701

Republican
Marion Steve Geiger 1121 Hwy 3

Uniontown, KS 66779

Republican
Marmaton David Duffey 1201 Locust Rd

Redfield, KS 66769

Republican
Millcreek Yvonne Beck 1821 159th Street

Fort Scott, KS 66701

Republican
Osage Brian Wade 2618 Soldier Rd.

Fort Scott, KS 66701

Democratic
Pawnee Karen A. Endicott-Coyan 1635 Fern Rd

Fort Scott, KS 66701

Republican
Scott Jim Sackett 2019 Maple Rd

Fort Scott, KS 66701

Republican
Timberhill Dan Laughlin 2275 105th St.

Mapleton, KS 66754

Republican
Walnut No Republican or Democratic Candidates filed
TOWNSHIP TREASURER
Drywood No Republican or Democratic Candidates filed
Franklin No Republican or Democratic Candidates filed
Freedom Karen A. Paddock 608 W Cedar St.

Fulton, KS 66738

Republican
Marion Rex Wilson 905 Clay St.

Bronson, KS 66716

Republican
Marmaton Wilma K. Graham 102 W 4th

Redfield, KS 66769

Democratic
Millcreek Betty L. Graham 1458 Tomahawk Rd

Fort Scott, KS 66701

Democratic
Osage Kathleen Valentine 2638 Tomahawk Rd

Fort Scott, KS 66701

Republican
Pawnee Sharon Middleton 1374 Eagle Rd

Fort Scott, KS 66701

Democratic
Scott Harold Rogers 2189 Ironwood Rd

Fort Scott, KS 66701

Republican
Timberhill David Scharenberg 1045 Yale Rd

Mapleton, KS 66754

Republican
Walnut No Republican or Democratic Candidates filed
 
STATE OF KANSAS OFFICIAL JUDICIAL BALLOT
Supreme Court Justice, Court of Appeals Judges, District Court Judges and District Magistrate Judge
Question #1, Shall the following Supreme Court Justice be retained in office?
Eric S. Rosen 1928 S.W. Indian Woods Ln.

Topeka, KS 66611

Position 4
Question #2, Shall the following Court of Appeals Judges be retained in office?
Sarah E. Warner Kansas Judicial Center

301 SW 10th Ave

Topeka, KS 66612

Position 4
David E. Bruns Olathe Position 6
G. Gordon Atcheson 301 SW 10th Ave

Topeka, KS 66612

Position 8
Karen M. Arnold-Burger 301 SW 10th Ave

Topeka, KS 66612

Position 9
Kathryn Gardner 301 SW 10th Ave

Topeka, KS 66612

Position 14
 
Question #3, Shall the following Judges of the District Court be retained in office?
  Terri L Johnson PO Box 311

Pleasanton, KS 66075

District 6, Division 2
  Mark A. Ward 829 190th St

Fort Scott, KS 66701

District 6, Division 3

 

  Steven C. Montgomery 22404 S. Roosevelt St.

Spring Hill, KS 66083

District 6, Division 4
 
Question #4, Shall the following Judge of the District Magistrate be retained in office?
  Valorie R. Leblanc 210 S. National

Fort Scott, KS 66701

District 6
Shall the following be adopted?

Shall Bourbon County, Kansas,

levy (renew) a one percent

countywide retailers’ sales tax to

take effect on July 1, 2021, and

expire on June 30, 2031, with the

allocated shares pursuant to

K.S.A. 2019 Supp. 12-192 to be

used as follows: (1) to Bourbon

county, for the purpose of

maintenance and construction of

hard surface roads, and (2) to

each city located in Bourbon

county, for the purpose of

providing funding for public services?

Kendell Mason, County Clerk &

(SEAL)                                                              Bourbon County Election Officer

Fort Scott Lighthouse gathering Thursday, September 3

 

The Community is invited to the Fort Scott Aglow Lighthouse monthly gathering at 6:30 p.m., Thursday September 3rd in the conference room of Rodeway Inn, 101 State Street.

This is an interdenominational ministry opportunity for women, men and youth to worship, pray, fellowship and grow in unity. We desire to propel the Kingdom forward through the elevation of the knowledge of God. The goal of Aglow International is: Every nation touched, every heart changed.

The believers’ identity and authority in Christ will be our focus this week.

Our Lighthouse desires the body of Christ to come together to meet some needs in Bourbon County. We have been assisting the Fort Scott Youth Home with paint, cleaning, and repairs. We have planted a group garden. Other projects are in the planning stages. We plan to meet the needs of those that cannot speak for themselves. Another need for our area is to do more to protect the unborn. Committees are being formed. For more information contact Amanda Gilmore at (620) 215-0418 or Bob Reazin at (620) 363-0257.

LaRoche Building Update: Outside Nearing Completion

The
The LaRoche Building at Wall and National Avenue, June 22, 2020. The upstairs will be apartments and the downstairs,  businesses.

Several downtown Fort Scott buildings are in process of being transformed.

The LaRoche Building that faces National Avenue in September 2018 just before renovation of the downtown buildings..

 

Work began on two historic side-by-side downtown buildings at 10 and 12 E. Wall St.,owned by Jennifer LaRoche on Nov. 5, 2018.

 

The outside work is now nearly complete and the interior spaces are on the list for completion.

The LaRoche Building, August 2020.
The National Avenue side of the LaRoche Building, August 2020..

 

The buildings on Wall Street at National Avenue have been the work of several local contractors and businesses, which were able to work through the COVID 19 Pandemic restrictions.

 

The LaRoche Building space housing the Common Ground Coffee Co. at 10 East Wall Street was completed just before the COVID 19 Pandemic started in the U.S. in March 2020.

 

Then Kenny Felt Photography moved its office to the space just west of the coffee shop at 12 E. Wall Street.

 

Now the building that faces both Wall and National is being worked on.

 

“By the middle of September, I will have the building weather tight,” Jennifer LaRoche said. “And then we will start on the inside. I do not know how long that could take to complete. I don’t have an end date.”

“In the Tribune Building…….The upstairs will be apartments. Anywhere from two to four,” she said. “I have not decided yet.
On the ground level, it can occupy four businesses. I do not know what businesses will want to occupy the space.”

Sewer Mapping For Fort Scott Starts This Month

The City of Fort Scott has hired Midland GIS Solutions to survey and map the City’s sanitary sewer collection network. This generally consists of locating utility features with global positioning system (GPS) equipment.

This work will be ongoing during the months of July-September of 2020.

You may notice employees of Midland GIS Solutions working in your neighborhood. They will occasionally need access into and through private property. The City has easements to perform this type of work and Midland GIS will be as respectful and unobtrusive as possible while completing this project.

As with any major project, there will be some inconveniences at times,but no service will be interrupted while this project is taking place.

If you have any questions or concerns you may contact Midland GIS Solutions at (660) 562-0050 or contact Michael Mix at {620) 215-6319.

Nancy Ingle Files For Senate

Nancy Ingle. Submitted photo.

The 13th Senate District has a new candidate. Nancy Ingle of Pittsburg filed for the Democratic nomination for the Senate Seat. Ingle, a retired attorney, filed on Friday, May 29th.

A native of Pittsburg, Ingle has previously served Crawford County as an assistant prosecutor in the Crawford County Attorney’s office, and also as an Assistant for Policy in the Office of former Governor John Carlin. She worked in the private sector as a manager for a Fortune 500 company, Boeing, and for several highly respected research centers, including Cedars-Sinai and UCLA.

Ingle said that she decided to file for office because she has grown tired of the continuing discord in Topeka. “It isn’t even about being a Democrat or Republican anymore. It’s just plain petty politics. The people of SEK don’t have anyone who will stand up for their interests in the Senate.”

Ingle cited the antics of the Kansas State Senate last week as a very dark day for the people in the State of Kansas. The legislature passed a bill that stripped the Governor of her authority to protect the people. Before the final bill could even be read, they left town.

“If you are serious about governing and representing the people, you don’t treat a legislative bill like a hand grenade; throw it over the fence and run. If you believe what you are doing is right, you stand your ground, you don’t have to sneak out the backdoor.”

There are issues like Medicaid expansion, that have been pending for multiple years because of the back and forth bickering in Topeka. Ingle said, “It shouldn’t matter whose idea it is, if it’s good for your people and the State you need to get behind and push.”

The 13th district includes all of Cherokee and Crawford counties and parts of Bourbon and Labette.