Category Archives: History

Celebrating the Life of Martin Luther King Jr.

In honor of Gordon Parks and his tribute to Martin Luther King, Jr.,
The Gordon Parks Museum has scheduled a series of events to celebrate his life.
Starting on January 13th at 7pm
The Gordon Parks Museum Presents:
Kansas City Friends of Alvin Ailey’s: Ever Present
Then, on Friday, Jan. 14th and Monday, Jan. 17th, the film showings of
Eyes on the Prize: American Civil Rights
After the first film on January 14th, there will be a Lunch & Learn in the Ellis Arts Center at 12pm. The Fort Scott High School Advanced Drama students will be reading the “I Have A Dream” speech given by Martin Luther King.
The community is invited and encouraged to bring canned food or cleaning products from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. to the museum which is in recognition of King’s day of service events that will happen nationally. These canned goods/cleaning products will be presented to The Beacon, a local helping agency. Please, no out-of-date goods.
After the 1st film on the 17th, the Lunch & Learn event by Prisca Barnes, will be speaking on the “The Dockum Drugstore Sit-In”, an event that happened in Wichita.
A free lunch will be provided by Luther’s BBQ. Drinks and desserts will be provided by Great Western Dining.

Martin Luther King Celebrated Next Week

Gordon Parks Museum is located on the campus of Fort Scott Community College.

The Gordon Parks Museum staff has been calling attention to and celebrating the life of Martin Luther King Jr. for a decade, according to Kirk Sharp, the executive director of the museum for three years.

“King was an activist, a (black)Baptist minister during the civil rights protests, who fought for change to eliminate racial inequality, all through non-violence,” Sharp said.

Kirk Sharp. Submitted photo.

The community is invited and encouraged to learn more about his life, which is celebrated nationally around January 15, his birthdate.

Several days are planned to celebrate King’s life in Fort Scott.

This celebration will be done through a series of diverse events: dramatic readings, ballet, films, Lunch and Learns, and the sharing of food.

Events start on Thursday, January 13 at the Danny and Willa Ellis Family Fine Arts Center, on the campus of Fort Scott Community College, 2108 S. Horton.

The day begins with the museum staff hosting the Fort Scott Area Chamber Coffee at 8:00 am.

At 7 p.m. that evening, a Kansas City ballet group will do a  tribute performance in honor of Martin Luther King and Gordon Parks

The Kansas City Friends of Alvin Ailey: Ever Present will give a free performance that is funded by the Fort Scott Area Community Foundation.

A reception will follow the performance with light refreshments hosted by Great Western Dining, the FSCC food service provider.

Friday, January 14, a Lunch and Learn in the Ellis Arts Center at noon will feature the Fort Scott High School Advanced Drama students reading the “I Have A Dream” speech given by King. The students are under the direction of teacher Angela Bin.

FSCC students and members of the community will also do some readings related to Martin Luther King, Sharp said.

A reception will follow with birthday cake in honor of King’s birthday.

Lunch and dessert will be provided by Great Western Dining.

The day will also include three film showings at 9:00 am, 1:30 pm, and 3:30 pm, all related to the American Civil Rights Movement.

The celebration will wrap up on Monday, Jan 17th, with a Lunch and Learn event at noon by Prisca Barnes, speaking on the “The Dockum Drugstore Sit-In”, an event that happened in Wichita.

A free lunch will be provided by Luther’s BBQ. Drinks and desserts will be provided by Great Western Dining.

 

The community is invited and encouraged to bring canned food or cleaning products from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. to the museum which is in recognition of King’s day of service events that will happen nationally. These canned goods/cleaning products will be presented to The Beacon, a local helping agency. Please, no out-of-date goods.

The Fort Scott Community College Endowment Foundation is a key contributor to the celebration events.

All events will take place at both the Gordon Parks Museum and Ellis Fine Arts Center.

Civil Rights films will also be shown throughout the day on Friday and Monday.

On Friday, Jan. 14, the community can view the beginning of the series of films Eyes on the Prize: American Civil Rights which starts at 9 a.m. with Awakening,  about the murder of Emmett Till and the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

At 1:30 p.m. view Fighting Back, a story of the Little Rock Nine and James Meredith.

At 3:30 p.m. view Ain’t Scared of Your Jails, a story of the Nashville sit-ins/boycotts and the Freedom Riders.

On Jan. 17,  at 9 a.m. view No Easy Walk, stories from Georgia and Alabama, and the Walk to Washington.

Martin Luther King.

At 10:30 a.m., Mississippi: Is This America? stories of Medgar Evers and the “Mississippi Burning” murders.

And at 1:30 p.m. A Tribute to Martin Luther King, Jr by Gordon Parks.

The mission of the Gordon Parks Museum is to honor the life and work of Gordon Parks, internationally-known photographer, filmmaker, writer, and musician; and to use his remarkable life story to teach about artistic creativity, cultural awareness, and the role of diversity in our lives.

Gordon Parks.

For more information call the Gordon Parks Museum at

620-223-2700 ext. 5850.

Bourbon County Tax Sale: 78 Properties Up For Auction

The Bourbon County Courthouse, 2nd and National Avenue in Fort Scott.

Seventy-eight properties will go up for auction at the Bourbon County Tax sale next Thursday, January 13, 2022.

Forty-one are Fort Scott properties and 31 are from the Mapleton area, most of which are from Hidden Valley Lake, according to a spokesperson for the county.

Buyers must register for a bidding number at the Bourbon County Treasurer’s Office, 210 S. National Avenue.

Buyers can’t have delinquent taxes in Bourbon County.

Family members can’t buy property owned by another family member.

Properties in the city of Fort Scott will have an opening bid of the special assessment due on the property.

Any Fort Scott properties that don’t sell will go to the Fort Scott Landbank.

There is no redemption period for the current owner, properties transfer to the new owner at the auction.

Payment in full is required at the end of the auction.

There is an added fee for filing the deed above the auction bid price.

Announcements by the county will override any prior statements.

 

To view the tax sale properties:

 

BBCO Tax Sale 01 13 22 public

 

BOURBON COUNTY TAX AUCTION
JANUARY 13, 2022
PROPERTY LISTING
property address, City, OwnerName, OPENING BID, 2021 TAXES

1011 CLAY BRONSON ERICKSON, RICKY A 49.52
305 MAIN BRONSON BARTLETT, RICHARD L 146.19
307 CHARLEs BRONSON COMPTON, WILLIAM 73.78
1007 230TH ST FORT SCOTT HUTTON, GEORGIA N & PAMELA  500.73
104 N HOLBROOK FORT SCOTT HAWPE, AUBREY C  10.79
107 N CRAWFORD FORT SCOTT COWLISHAW, REBECCA  $ 6 46.32 6.41
110 S MAIN FORT SCOTT BENITIZ, SANTIAGO2 ,152.36
113 N HOLBROOK FORT SCOTT HAWPE, AUBREY C 558.74
113 S NATIONAL FORT SCOTT D J & A LLC  $ – 5 ,794.21
116 N CRAWFORD FORT SCOTT APRIL, HAROLD $ 6,852.85 608.61
12 N EDDY FORT SCOTT ISAACSON, JAMES  $ 8,988.58 1 ,031.97
1302 GRAND RD FORT SCOTT JAYHAWK ENERGY INC  59.71
1311 E 1ST ST FORT SCOTT SIMPSON, BETTY A $ 2 0,516.37 230.32
1403 E OAK FORT SCOTT HACKNER, NELSON D  $ 9 24.42 152.66
1498 212TH TER FORT SCOTT KENDRICK, JACK 142.32
1517 S MAIN FORT SCOTT HAGOOD, RAEANNE $ 1 79.32 203.43
1801 E WALL FORT SCOTT FOULK, JOHN D & ADDIE $ 7,521.70 752.59
201 S CRAWFORD FORT SCOTT APRIL, HAROLD $ 4,489.10 43.09
202 S BARBEE FORT SCOTT DECKER, MARY / FILES, CYNTHIA  $ 1 3,431.95 43.09
208 N CRAWFORD FORT SCOTT DUROSSETTE, CHRISTINE  $ 1 0,495.20 9.40
2144 MAPLE RD FORT SCOTT JUDY, ELMER JR & LEE ELLA 233.91
215 S OSBUN FORT SCOTT HAM, JACK D JR $ 6 9.83 9.40
216 S MARGRAVE FORT SCOTT FRIEND, MARGARET 111 341.35
219 S CRAWFORD FORT SCOTT DOUCET, STEVEN DAVID 510.08
312 S HEYLMAN FORT SCOTT COWLISHAW, JESSICA  $ 2 ,754.35 130.59
315 N SHUTE FORT SCOTT JOHNSON, MITCHELL  $ 1,949.34 89.55
317 S LITTLE FORT SCOTT CLARK, RICHARD$ 1 3,498.17 43.09
323 W 2ND ST FORT SCOTT HIPPLE, PAMELA  $ 1 7,816.91 67.02
324 S BROADWAY FORT SCOTT JOHNSON, MITCHELL  $ 6,051.44 47.86
416 S CRAWFORD FORT SCOTT ALFARO, ARLENE/KELSCH, GEORGE$ 1 3,948.43 93.34
417 S MAIN FORT SCOTT IRELAND, MICHAEL T/NEEDHAM, TRAVIS/ COON, RYAN $ 4 ,052.86 93.34
517 S BURKE FORT SCOTT CARSON, JOHN H 504.92
517 S CLARK FORT SCOTT DUREN, JIMMIE D  $ 1 1,049.66 413.96
602 N SHUTE FORT SCOTT JOHNSON, MITCHELL  $ 8 21.82 51.29
602 S ANDRICK FORT SCOTT CARSON, SHANE’313.73
612 S COUCH FORT SCOTT ADAMS, TYSON SR $ 4,329.60 9.40
615 S COUCH FORT SCOTT ADAMS, TYSON SR$ 2,985.12 9.40
616 S HORTON FORT SCOTT NEWBERRY, JAMES  $ 7,241.70 93.34
619 S HEYLMAN FORT SCOTT DAVENPORT, SAMUEL  $ 7 4.78 9.40
621 S BARBEE FORT SCOTT APRIL, HAROLD  $ 2,126.93 135.98
E SYCAMORE FORT SCOTT JOHNSON, MITCHELL 20.34
N MARION FORT SCOTT BUCHFINK, TOMMY SUE  9.40
N SHUTE FORT SCOTT JOHNSON, MITCHELL 26.14
N SHUTE FORT SCOTT JOHNSON, MITCHELL 20.14
EAGLE ROAD GARLAND CULVER, ED  0.88
10 BITTERSWEET RD MAPLETON AFUALO, COLETTE  8.01
10 KANSAS DR MAPLETON DAVID, ANDREW R 185.40
11 BOURBON DR MAPLETON FREAR, INEZ G  6.75
127 OAK DR MAPLETON ADAMS, JAMES D JR & ADAMS, BRIAN 8.01
130 PERSIMMON RD MAPLETON HARN, LEVI/BRIGGS, JEFFREY  31.91
138 HIDDEN VALLEY RD MAPLETON HIGGINS, TRAVIS 2021-14.35
14 CLARK RD MAPLETON ANDRES, RICHARD 8.01
16 CLARK RD MAPLETON ANDRES, RICHARD 8.01
17 BITTERSWEET RD MAPLETON GLASS, LARRY  15.03
19 APPLE RD MAPLETON BRADFORD, DALE R 8.01
20 PECAN RD MAPLETON BOLIN, WALTER E TRUST 7.45
22 E EASTPORT RD MAPLETON GIER, JOHN A 8.01
22 WARE RD MAPLETON HAUN, CHRISTOPHER M 13.03
25 CHESTNUT DR MAPLETON DUNIVAN, MICHAEL P  8.01
27 CEDAR LN MAPLETON PARKER, BARRY / JARVI, STEVE  9.64
4 HACKBERRY RD MAPLETON SOWELL, SAMUEL D & DANIELLE D / COOPER, GARY 6.75
4 LOCUST RD MAPLETON BROWN, ANTHONY E  8.01
42 WARE RD MAPLETON HESS, DONALD G 9.48
48 HACKBERRY RD MAPLETON HARRIS, JESSIE R  8.01
48 WARE RD MAPLETON GILLESPIE, KENNETH C  21.60
BOURBON COUNTY TAX AUCTION

JANUARY 13, 2022
PROPERTY LISTING
5 APPLE RD MAPLETON HUNTER, JESSE W8.01
57 WARE RD MAPLETON GRIFFITHS, DALE15.99
58 WARE RD MAPLETON ADAMS, TYSON SR7.31
6 HACKBERRY RD MAPLETON SOWELL, SAMUEL D & DANIELLE D / COOPER, GARY  8.01
6 PECAN RD MAPLETON BOLIN, WALTER E TRUST 13.43
8 E LAKEVIEW RD MAPLETON BELT, AIMEE C16.98
80 WARE RD MAPLETON LINDBLOOM, VERNON L / GILLILAND, JOSEPH 6.75
98 CLARK RD MAPLETON FRIZZELL, ROBERT T 8.01
LIBERTY MAPLETON CULVER, INC1 1.95
MAIN MAPLETON CULVER, INC 10.85
20TH ST MORAN BURNS, WILLIAM34.71
402 N CEDAR REDFIELD CRAWFORD, HAZEL804.24
405 WASHINGTON UNIONTOWN CARPENTER, R A 57.14
41 FORT SCOTT
30 MAPLETON
1 GARLAND
1 REDFIELD
1 UNIONTOWN
3 BRONSON
1 MORAN
78
Sale date: 1/13/2022
Time: 10:00
Location: Bourbon County Courthouse
TERMS:
Buyers must register for a bidding number at the Treasurer’s office
Buyers cannot have delinquent taxes in Bourbon County.
Family members cannot buy property owned by another family member.
Properties in the City of Fort Scott will have an opening bid of the Special Assessment due on the property (if any)
Any properties in the City of Fort Scott that do not sell at this auction will go into the Fort Scott Land Bank
There is no redemption period for the current owner, properties transfer to the new owner after the auction.
Payment in full is required at the end of the auction
There will be an adidtional fee for filing the deed above the auction bid price.
Announcements by the County at the auction over ride any prior statemetns.

In Celebration of Martin Luther King Jr.: Lunch and Learn

There will be a Lunch and Learn about segragation practices in Wichita in the 1950s on Monday, January 17th, 2022, from 12 p.m. – 1 p.m. at the Danny and Willa Ellis Family Fine Arts Center on the campus of Fort Scott Community College.

Attendance is free.

Lunch provided by Luther’s BBQ (visitors may bring their own lunch)
Drinks and desserts provided by Great Western Dining.

The event is called Martin Luther King, Jr.  Lunch and Learn  “Dockum Drugstore Sit-In”

The presentation explores Wichita’s Dockum Drugstore Sit-In
Guest Speaker is  Prisca Barnes.

In July 1958, Black Students gathered at Wichita’s Dockum Drugstore to stage a peaceful protest against the unequal practice of segregation. Although this protest was not publicized in the newspapers in 1958, the students participating in the demonstration worked to gain access to public spaces, like movie theaters and restaurants. This presentation discusses the details of the sit-in, explores how these protests helped transform the struggle for racial equality, and considers contemporary non-violent protests.

Prisca Barnes is the founder of Storytime Village, Inc., a nonprofit organization in Wichita that promotes reading among low-income children and families. She is a passionate advocate for equity in education and literacy.

“The Dockum Drugstore Sit-In” is part of Humanities Kansas’s Movement of Ideas Speakers Bureau, featuring presentations and workshops designed to share stories that inspire, spark conversations that inform, and generate insights that strengthen civic engagement.

For more information about “The Dockum Drugstore Sit-In” contact the Gordon Parks Museum.

Gordon Parks Museum to celebrate the life of Martin Luther King Jr.

Gordon Parks Museum is located on the campus of Fort Scott Community College.

The Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration will be held, with several events planned in Fort Scott.

The events will start on Thursday, January 13th at the Danny & Willa Ellis Family Fine Arts Center.

The day will include with hosting of the Fort Scott Area Chamber Coffee at 8:00 am and later that evening, a free ballet tribute performance at 7:00 pm by The Kansas City Friends of Alvin Ailey: Ever Present.

This is a tribute in honor of Martin Luther King and Gordon Parks. This performance is funded by the Fort Scott Area Community Foundation.

CELEBRATING THE LIFE OF MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR.

Thursday, January 13th – Tribute to Martin
7 p.m. – Alvin Ailey’s Kansas City Dance Group Ballet Performance
Gordon Parks: Tribute to Martin Luther King (FREE Event) – Ellis Fine Arts Center • Doors open at 6 p.m. • Reception to follow, which includes a meet and greet with performers and drinks and refreshments

Friday, January 14th – Celebrating Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Birthday
9 a.m. – Film Showing: Eyes on the Prize: American Civil Rights – “Awakenings (1954-1956)” • Murder of Emmett Till &
Montgomery Bus Boycott

12 p.m. – Lunch & Learn – Martin Luther King, Jr. Birthday Celebration • Dramatic reading of the speech “I have a Dream” by
Fort Scott Community College students and members of the community • Balloons will be released • Birthday cake, soup,
dessert, and drinks will be available for free • Photo Promotion taken with “I Stand For” sign

1:30 p.m. – Film Showing: Eyes on the Prize: American Civil Rights – “Fighting Back (1957-1962)” • Central High School and Little Rock Nine & James Meredith and The University of Mississippi

3:30 p.m. – Film Showing: Eyes on the Prize: American Civil Rights – “Ain’t Scared of Your Jails (1960-1961)” • Nashville Sit-Ins and Boycotts & Freedom Riders”

Monday, January 17th – Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday Celebration Event

9 a.m. – 2 p.m. – Food Drive – Join us as we will collect canned and non-perishable food items to donate to the Beacon in
Fort Scott • Anyone in the community is invited to drop off canned food

9 a.m. – Film Showing: Eyes on the Prize: American Civil Rights – “No Easy Walk (1961-1963)” • Albany, Georgia, Birmingham, Alabama & The March on Washington

10:30 a.m. – Film Showing: Eyes on the Prize: American Civil Rights – “Mississippi: Is this America? (1962-1964)” • Medgar Evers & ‘Mississippi Burning’ Murders

12 p.m. – Lunch & Learn – “The Dockman Drugstore Sit-In” presentation by Prisca Barnes • Barbeque lunch, drinks, and
dessert will be available for free (guests may also bring their own lunch)

1:30 p.m. – Film Showing: “Martin”, A tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. by Gordon Parks – This is a ballet tribute to Dr. King, written and directed by Gordon Parks
For more information, please call (620) 223-2700 ext. 5850

Funding provided by:
FSACF serves to fulfill philanthropic goals that benefit the common good and improve quality of life by providing leadership and programming that is responsive to the interests and needs of
the residents of the Fort Scott area.

All events will be held at the Ellis Fine Arts Center (2108 S. Horton St., Fort Scott, KS)

A reception will follow the performance with light refreshments hosted by Great Western Dining.

On Friday, January 14th, the community is invited to the Ellis Fine Arts Center for a free Lunch and Learn event that will be held at 12:00 pm featuring a dramatic reading of the “I have a dream” speech by FSCC students and members of the community.

 

The Fort Scott Community College Endowment Foundation is a key contributor to the celebration events. All events will take place at both the Gordon Parks Museum and Ellis Fine Arts Center.

A full list of film showings and events can be found at https://www.gordonparkscenter.org/events. For more information call the Gordon Parks Museum at 620-223-2700 ext. 5850.

40th Annual Historic Candlelight Tour: Finding Peace On The Frontier

A vignette on the tour, 2017.

For forty years the Fort Scott National Historic Site has had re-enactors portray people on the prairie in the 1840s era, just before Christmas, called The Candlelight Tour. This year the tours are Dec. 3-4, Friday and Saturday evenings.

“The purpose of the tour is to provide a deeper understanding of this region’s history, that helped shape this nation, and specifically how the fort was involved in that,” Carl Brenner, FSNHS Program Manager, Interpretation and Resource Manager, said. “Instead of just telling the story, we are trying to help people become immersed in that story.”

Fort Scott National Historic Site glows during the annual candlelight tour event.

Tickets are $8, children five and under are free. To purchase call 620.223.0310

Friday evening, tours start at 6:30 p.m. and the last one is 9 p.m. On Saturday, the first tours are at 5 p.m., and the last start at 8:45 p.m.

Please arrive 10 minutes early to park, present a ticket, and acclimate yourself.

This year there are five vignettes, or re-enacted portrayals, circa 1842-1851. Forty volunteers and 10 staff will be involved in the tour this year.

The theme is Finding Peace on the Prairie.

The vignettes include:

  • Soldiers arriving at the fort, who are acting as peacekeepers between the Native Americans and the Anglo-European settlers.
  • Soldiers protecting trade goods along the Santa Fe Trail, keeping the peace. Fort Scott High School drama students helped write the script for this portrayal.
  • Soldiers returning from the Mexican-American War, celebrating the Peace Treaty of 1848.
  • Keeping peace along the Arkansas River by escorting people heading to the California Gold Rush, looking for fortune.
  • A traveling minister came through the fort in 1851, providing a message of peace on earth to the soldiers.

Brenner said there are approximately 25 tickets left and the later tours, after 8:15 p.m., there are some available for families or groups.

Tours will be all outside, so visitors should dress to stay warm.

“Masks are required in all federal buildings, including the visitor center and restrooms,” Brenner said.

Tours are handicapped accessible.

“We are asking people to show up 10 minutes early and meet at the west (left) side of the visitor center building, between the two buildings, on the sidewalk,” he said.

Photo Credit: Fort Scott National Historic Site. Re-enactors in the 2017 Candlelight Tour.

 

 

 

 

 

Fort Scott Home Placed on the Kansas Historical Register

512 S. Judson.
The house at 512 S. Judson has recently been approved for the Kansas State Historical Register.
The current owner, Ronda Hassig, and husband, Rob,  moved in in February 2019.
“We are both history teachers and moved from Olathe to Lawrence for retirement,” Ronda said.
They were there for one year when a native of this area and friend, Carmen Streeter Misse, showed her the house.
“We drove right down and bought it outright,” she said. “It was the house we had always dreamed of owning and putting our Victorian antique furniture in.”
It had been up for auction two times since Ken Lunt died, she said.
Ken and his wife, Charlotte, were well-known volunteers in the community. Lunt who was the mayor of Fort Scott died in 2013, Charlotte in 2007.
“Both times (it went up for auction) there was interest from a salvage company in Kansas City,” she said. “We decided to get it on the Kansas Historical Register, once we settled in. Once on the register, it would be protected from such a fate.”
Ronda was a middle school librarian, and is a historical fiction author and “all-around research nerd,” she said and began researching the history of the house.
Ronda Hassig. Taken from the Lowell Milken Center Facebook page.

History of the house

“The Thomas and Anna Herbert house sits at 512 Judson Street, the sign on the house says it was built in 1887, but it was built in 1888,” she said. “Thomas bought the property in 1870 and married Anna in 1873. They waited a while to build the house though.”
“He owned a successful home design business at 2nd and Wall and sold paint, wallpaper, household items from all over the world, and anything dealing with decorating your home,” she said. “He was a painter. In my research, I found that he helped decorate some of the most beautiful homes in Fort Scott.”
The couple had no children and Thomas died in 1913. Anna sold the house in 1917 to a banker, C.D. Sample.
In seeking to be on the register, Hassig thought she could do the architecture piece on the application.
“It became apparent after trying to use the dictionary for every other word when explaining the features of the house, that this was a job for a professional,” she said.
Hassig hired Susan Fort, a preservationist, and architect from Kansas City, Missouri to help her with the application.
On November 13, 2021, she found out the application was approved.
Now it is on the Kansas State Historial Register, but is heading to the U.S. Park Service for approval for the National Register of Places, she said.
“We should know in three to six months,” she said. “Then a plaque will be put on its’ beautiful facade.”
“I hope that Ken and Charlotte Lunt are happy in heaven with the exciting news and won’t mind too terribly that the house will now be called the Thomas and Anna Herbert House,” she said.

Presentation Explores The Fight For Women’s Suffrage in Kansas

The Lowell Milken Center for Unsung Heroes is located a 1 S. Main, Fort Scott.

Fort Scott, Kansas – Lowell Milken Center for Unsung Heroes in Fort Scott will host “The Fight for Women’s Suffrage in Kansas,” a presentation and discussion via Zoom by Dr. Sarah Bell on Friday, November 19th, 2021 at 3:30pm, at the Lowell Milken Center at 1 South Main Street. Members of the community are invited to attend the free program. Contact the Lowell Milken Center for Unsung Heroes at #620-223-1312 for more information. The program is made possible by Humanities Kansas. Refreshments will be provided for those attending at the Center.

Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82602725600?pwd=UE10T0R2T1hCb2prTi9TZ1NWZmZpZz09

Meeting ID: 826 0272 5600
Passcode: 269586

Kansas was repeatedly a leader in advancing progressive issues and rights for women during the late 19th century. However, one cannot talk about women’s suffrage, without noting that the movement and its leaders were primarily white and middle class. Many of these women practiced and perpetuated prejudice against Black women throughout women’s organizations at this time. However, Black women were as actively involved in pushing for equal and civil rights in Kansas as their white counterparts. This presentation will highlight several Black women who were leaders in suffrage, the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union, and women’s clubs, while walking through the fifty-year chronology of women fighting to get the vote in Kansas. It will also touch on key events and leaders, while examining why it took so many years to achieve this milestone called suffrage.

Sarah Bell has a Ph.D. from the University of Kansas in History and is Development Officer at the Watkins Museum of History in Lawrence. Her dissertation studied woman suffragists’ participation with the Chautauqua Movement.

The women I research inspire me to fight for progress and justice in our world today. Sharing their stories is a way to honor and recognize their hard work at advancing our society,” said Bell.

This presentation is part of Kansas’s Movement of Ideas Speakers Bureau, featuring presentations and workshops designed to share stories that inspire, spark conversations that inform, and generate insights that strengthen civic engagement.

For more information about “The Fight for Women’s Suffrage in Kansas” presentation in Fort Scott, contact the Lowell Milken Center for Unsung Heroes or call #620-223-1312 or visit our Facebook page – Lowell Milken Center for Unsung Heroes.

About Humanities Kansas

Humanities Kansas is an independent nonprofit spearheading a movement of ideas to empower the people of Kansas to strengthen their communities and our democracy. Since 1972, our pioneering programming, grants, and partnerships have documented and shared stories to spark conversations and generate insights. Together with our partners and supporters, we inspire all Kansans to draw on history, literature, ethics, and culture to enrich their lives and serve the communities and state we all proudly call home. Visit humanitieskansas.org.

About the Lowell Milken Center: The Lowell Milken Center is a non-profit 501 © (3) that works with students and educators within a range of diverse academic disciplines, to develop projects focused on unsung heroes. Once their projects are finished, we advocate the student’s unsung heroes by sharing them in our Hall of Unsung Heroes or our website so people all over the world discover their individual influence and obligation to take actions that improve the lives of others. The Hall of Unsung Heroes is proudly located in Southeast Kansas and showcases some of the top projects developed in collaboration with the Center.

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Lowell Milken Center Features New Exhibits and Expands

The unveiling of the exhibit honoring African American Suffragettes Mamie Dillard and Carrie Langston Hughes by Lowell Milken Center Docent Rhonda Hassig, left, and Miah Lugrand, the principal of Pinckney Elementary School, Lawrence, KS. Both Dillard and Hughes lived in Lawrence.

The Lowell Milken Center for Unsung Heroes, 1 S. Main, has expanded its’ exhibits into the park south of the building.

On October 8, the center hosted an unveiling of two Kansas black women who were suffragettes in the movement to allow women to vote. The exhibit was sponsored by a Kansas Humanities Grant and featured Carrie Langston Hughes and Mamie Dillard.

In addition, that day several new exhibits were unveiled in the green space area south of the center, named the Unsung Heroes Park.

“The objectives of the park are to provide a place for visitors to enjoy the pleasant outdoor scenery, learn about unsung heroes, and offer a centralized community gathering space for programs and activities, while also complementing the downtown area,” according to a prior LMC press release.

To view the  press release on the park:

New Unsung Heroes Park in Downtown Fort Scott

 

A Lowell Milken Center for Unsung Heroes screen announcing the new exhibit featuring Kansas Suffragettes Carrie Langston Hughes and Mamie Dillard.

The new outside exhibits in the Unsung Heroes Park are inter-changeable and will be occasionally switched out, Ronda Hassig, LMC Docent, said.

“We are still awaiting murals that will be placed on the north side of the center, facing Wall Street and also on the south side of the center, facing the park,” she said.

The biggest part of the funding for the park was by the center’s founder Lowell Milken. Milken believes “education can awaken the mind, sustain curiosity and strengthen our engagement with others. More importantly, … education has the power to instill in people the impulse to take initiative for the good of others,” according to the LMC for Unsung Heroes website.

Others who helped with the park funding: the American Association of Retired People Challenge Award, The Timken Foundation, and a Sunderland Grant, Hassig said.

Lowell Milken Center Director Norm Conard, left, welcomes the crowd to the unveiling of new exhibits on Oct. 8. Megan Felt, LMC Program Director; Ronda Hassig, LMC Docent; Robert Nelson who sang a moving spiritual as part of the program and Gordon Parks Museum Director Kirk Sharp look on.

 

Norm Conard, left, watches as Kirk Sharp and Robert Nelson unveil the Gordon Parks exhibit, which is part of the new expanded space for exhibits south of the Lowell Milken Center in downtown Fort Scott.
The storyboard, also called a story rail, of Gordon Parks, who had a humble beginning in Fort Scott and went on to be a famed photographer, journalist, author, and film producer.
One of the new exhibits features Mary Anning.
Chester Nez, a World War II Veteran, who was a Navajo Code Talker in service to his country, is featured on the new story rail in the Lowell Milken Center Unsung Heroes Park.
Juanita Moody is a new featured exhibit in the Unsung Heroes Park.
Amos Bronson Alcott is newly featured in the Unsung Heroes Park.
A waterfall feature adds to the beauty of the Unsung Heroes Park.
The greenspace south of the Lowell Milken Center at Main and Wall Street in downtown Fort Scott has new exhibits in the expanded area. The picture is taken from the southside of the center looking south. Main Street is to the right.

DAR Celebrates 110 Years in Fort Scott

The DAR Group. Submitted photo.

A local organization is celebrating 110 years in Fort Scott.

“The Daughter of the American Revolution organization itself is 131 years old being founded in 1890. Our chapter was founded in 1911 and thus we are 110 years old,” Martha Scott, a group member said.

The objectives of the Daughters of the American Revolution and the local Molly Foster Berry Chapter are to perpetuate the memory and spirit of the men and women who achieved American Independence; to cherish, maintain and extend the institutions of American freedom, to foster true patriotism and love of county, (and) to aid in securing for mankind all the blessings of liberty, according to information provided by Scott.

“In selecting a name for the chapter, they chose to honor the first regent, Miss Frances Hall, by selecting the wife of her Revolutionary War ancestor, Samuel Berry,” Scott said. “They chose the name of his wife, Mary Foster Berry, as the name of their chapter.”

Since its founding in 1890, the national DAR has admitted more than 950,000 members.

Currently, the Molly Foster Berry Chapter has 27 members.

The Daughters of the American Revolution is a heritage group whose members have a direct lineal descendant of either soldiers or those who aided the cause of independence during the American Revolutionary War.
Over the last 110 years, the chapter has participated in numerous activities to benefit Fort Scott, according to Scott.

Here are highlights of the group’s activities through the years provided by Scott:

  • They organized the local YMCA and Red Cross Chapter and Canteen.
  • They sponsored the Bourbon County Historical Society
  • They take credit for the vision and construction of a Memorial Hall after World War I, to honor all servicemen.  In appreciation of this effort, a meeting suite was designated in the building for DAR’s group use and is still used today for their meetings.
  • They placed 21 bronze plaques at historic sites including the government buildings at the fort.
  • They published and sold cookbooks during World War II  in order to buy War Bonds.
  • They sold National Defense albums.
  • They donated funds for the purchase of ten additional acres at the National Cemetery when it reached its capacity.
  • They were instrumental in getting the old Fort Blair Block House saved and repositioned on Carroll Plaza.

 

The volunteer efforts of members in the past 110 years continue today with members volunteering for activities in our community, she said.

 

“Molly Foster Berry Chapter members welcome new members and if you have an ancestor who served in the Revolutionary War or provided support to the War and would like to join our organization,  please contact the current Regent, Barbara Ritter, 913-636-4892  or the Registrar, Dee Ann Davis 620-215-1358,” Scott said.

Education and Entertainment: the Gordon Parks Celebration

John Mason, left,  leads a discussion on Gordon Parks’ book A Choice of Weapons, with  Harold Hicks, one of the book club facilitators, attending on the Zoom screen. A Fort Scott Community College Book Club had been discussing the book in previous weeks.  Mason is a history professor at the University of Virginia. In the book, Parks states that his weapons of choice in the fight against bigotry and poverty were love, dignity, and hard work. The book discussion was on Oct. 8 at the Ellis Arts Center on the campus of Fort Scott Community College.
Gordon Parks Museum Director Kirk Sharp gives an introduction to the Lunch and Learn speaker on Oct. 8 at the Ellis Fine Arts Center on the campus of Fort Scott Community College. The speaker, Angela Bates, is on the left.

The annual Gordon Parks Celebration weekend Oct. 7-9 was packed with events to educate and entertain.

The Gordon Parks Museum is located on the campus of Fort Scott Community College, 2401 S. Horton.

Parks was an African American documentary photojournalist, photographer, musician, writer and director, with humble beginnings in Fort Scott.

He died in 2006.

There were photo exhibits and a local photo contest, speakers, tours, film showings, entertainment, book discussions, and the opening of the Learning Tree Tourism Trail.

Two African American men were honored as the “Choice of Weapons” annual recipients, Kyle Johnson and Eli Reed.

Kyle Johnson is an actor, performer, and activist. Submitted photo.

 

Eli Reed is a photographer, author, producer, and director. Submitted photo.

Parks Choice of Weapons Award Winners Announced

During the weekend celebration, The Learning Tree Tourism Trail was introduced.

The Learning Tree Tourism Trail is a series of signs located at the different locations where the filming of The Learning Tree took place around Fort Scott. The signs include QR codes, to be used with a smartphone,  along with a virtual tour of the identified scene locations of the film, according to a Gordon Parks Museum press release.

To learn more:

The Learning Tree Tourism Trail Grand Opening is Oct. 7

Angela Bates speaks on Nicodemus, an African American town in Kansas, at a Lunch and Learn as part of the Gordon Parks Celebration on October 8.  Nicodemus, KS was a community of African Americans who came following the Civil War to start new lives as free people. Bates said the first year, 1877,  the Potowattamie and Osage Tribes of indigenous peoples helped the newcomers with food.

The annual photography contest in conjunction with the Gordon Parks Celebration had the winners on display at the Ellis Arts Center on the campus of FSCC.

Additionally on display were some of Parks’ photos and photos of The Learning Tree, the autobiographical film that Parks wrote and directed.

Winners of the Gordon Parks Celebration “Fashion & Diversity” photo contest, sponsored by Merl Humphrey Photography, are below.

Twenty-six entries were received and the winner of First Place was Johanna Walker (Franklin, KS) with the photo titled “Spotlight.”

Second Place was also Johanna Walker with the photo “Johnny.”

Third Place was Frank Clay with his photo, “Enjoying Each Other.”

First, Second, and Third place winners received cash prizes of $100, $75, and $50 respectively.

There were six Honorable Mentions named: “Diversity.” by (Yasser Alaa Mobarak,( Alexandria, Egypt.); “Skating the Disaster.” by Julie Steck (Merriam, KS); “Jewels of Plenty” by Bareigh Farrell (Fort Scott); “Portrait.” by Yasser Alaa Mobarak, (Alexandria, Egypt); “Queen of Color” by Alexxus Browning, Tulsa, OK and “Baby Blue.” by Adelay Martin (Redfield, KS).

The contest was open to any non-professional photographer and was inspired by Gordon Parks, who started his career in fashion photography and chose a camera to fight against racism, discrimination, and poverty.

Judges for the photo contest were professional photographer, Veretta Cobler, and established make-up artist and hairstylist, Donna Fumoso based in New York City.

The photo exhibit is on display in the lobby of the Ellis Fine Arts Center through October 15. The building is open from 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.

First Place was Johanna Walker (Franklin, KS) with the photo titled “Spotlight.”
Johanna Walker, Franklin, KS was second-place winner in the Gordon Parks Photography Contest. The contest winners were one of many artistic displays at the Gordon Parks Celebration.
Enjoying Each Other, a photograph by Frank Clay, Overland Park, KS was the third-place winner of the Gordon Parks Photography Contest.