Category Archives: Health Care

Access to COVID Testing

KDHE Takes Steps to Improve Access to and Speed of COVID-19 Testing
~ Actions are being taken to address the rapid increase in demand for COVID-19 testing due to Omicron variant ~

TOPEKA – Over the past month, the highly infectious and transmittable Omicron variant of COVID-19 has significantly increased case rates and demand for testing in the United States and Kansas. KDHE continues monitoring the spread and impact of Omicron since the first case was confirmed in Kansas in mid-December 2021.

As of January 16, 2022, the daily case rate has been more than 7,800 daily COVID-19 cases, that is a significant increase from about 1,200 cases per day in early December 2021.

Over the same period of time, KDHE saw testing rates increase. This increase in demand for COVID-19 tests has led to longer wait times, delays in turnaround of test results, and decrease in availability of rapid over-the-counter antigen tests.

KDHE is actively working to increase testing availability for all Kansans. Outlined below are a few of the steps KDHE has and continues to take to reduce wait times, improve turnaround times, and increase the number of mass testing sites in Kansas:

  • Coordinating with health departments to increase staff at existing sites across the state. The following locations are now open from 7 a.m. – 6 p.m., Monday – Saturday:
    • Johnson County – Johnson County Community College, 12345 College Blvd., Overland Park, KS
    • Johnson County – Church of the Resurrection, 13720 Roe Ave., Leawood, KS
  • Adding new testing sites to reduce wait times. KDHE is currently working to add 13 new testing sites, beginning with the following locations:
    • Johnson County – Shawnee Mission Park, 7900 Renner Rd., Shawnee, KS, opening January 19.
    • Johnson County – Roeland Park Community Center, 4850 Rosewood Dr., Roeland Park, KS, opening January 21.
    • Ellis County – Big Creek Crossing, 2918 Vine St., Hays, KS, opening January 21.
    • Crawford County – Countryside Christian Church, 1901 E 4th, Pittsburg, KS, opening January 21.
  • Identifying new partner labs to increase testing capacity and reduce test result turnaround times.
  • Sourcing indoor locations for mass testing sites to reduce closures due to weather.

Up to date information on testing locations and hours can be found at knowbeforeyougoKS.com.

KDHE is taking additional actions to expand testing access:

  • Community Testing Partners (CTPs): expanding the number and geographic footprint of partners (such as pharmacies, local health departments, and hospitals) to ensure broader availability of testing across the state.
  • Long Term Care Facilities (LTCFs): extending funding for PCR testing through March 2022 for Long Term Care Facilities to ensure they have screening and surveillance testing to protect the most vulnerable.
  • K-12 testing: prioritizing antigen testing kits for school districts, sourcing over 520,000 additional antigen test kits, and updating testing protocols to continue to keep Kansas schoolchildren safe.

Additionally, at-home COVID-19 rapid tests are now available for free at covidtests.gov. All households are eligible to order 4 free at-home tests, which will typically ship within 7-12 days. The first shipments of tests will begin in late January.

For Kansans with a health insurance plan, over-the-counter tests can be purchased at no cost or reimbursed through your health plan as of January 15. Check with your health plan for details and keep your receipt to submit a claim to your insurance company for reimbursement. For Medicare, Medicaid and CHIP beneficiaries, please check with your plan or state agency for information.

KDHE will continue to develop and pursue additional initiatives to increase testing capacity and shorten turnaround times to keep Kansans safe. In the meantime, KDHE continues to urge Kansans to use the following tools to protect against COVID-19 and the Omicron variant:

  • Get vaccinated and boosted. Vaccines remain the best tool to protect people from COVID-19, slow transmission and reduce the likelihood of new variants emerging. The authorized COVID-19 vaccines are highly effective in preventing serious illness, hospitalizations and death.
  • Wear a mask. Masks offer protection against all variants. It is recommended that people in Kansas wear a well-fitting mask in public indoor settings, where COVID-19 transmission remains high, regardless of vaccination status.
  • Social distance. People should avoid large gatherings and stay at least 6 feet from others when in public settings, especially if you are at higher risk of getting sick.
  • Stay home. If you have tested positive or are showing symptoms of COVID-19, such as a sore throat, cough, or fever, avoid spreading the virus by staying isolated. Consult a healthcare provider on your recommended course of treatment.

To find a free testing location in your community, or guidance about who should get tested, visit knowbeforeyougoKS.com.

To learn more about the vaccines, visit kansasvaccine.gov.

Find and schedule a vaccination appointment at vaccines.gov.

Critical Blood Shortage Impacting Kansas Hospitals 

TOPEKA – The Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) and the Kansas Trauma Program (KTP) continue to highlight the importance of blood donation amid increasingly critical blood shortages experienced across the state and nation. Blood shortages can pose risks to hospitals in performing necessary patient care. As January is National Blood Donor month, KDHE and KTP encourage those able to schedule an appointment to donate blood. In recent weeks, the Red Cross has declared this the worst blood shortage in over a decade, with less than a one-day supply of critical blood types. The Community Blood Center for our region is at a 1-2 day supply.

“We encourage Kansans who can donate blood to schedule an appointment today,” Janet Stanek, Acting Secretary, said. “Blood donation helps ensure our hospitals can continue their operations and has the ability to save lives.”

Updated policies and practices allow for safe donation during the pandemic. Donation centers provide specific guidance on the blood donation process and safety measures taken within their centers. The National Institutes of Health have found blood donations to be safe under current COVID-19 screening guidelines.

Locations for blood donation can be found at organization websites such as savealifenow.orgAmericasBlood.org, or redcrossblood.org.

Support For Moms with Infants Available For Free

Diapers are given to mothers who participate in each meeting of the Mommy and Me program. Submitted photo.

Mommy and Me is a support and education program for mothers with children or who are pregnant.

The support group meets monthly at the Southeast Kansas Multi-County Health Department in Fort Scott at 6th and Horton.

The next one is scheduled for Wednesday, January 19 at 4 p.m.

The group meets once a month, with a topic of discussion.

As an encouragement to attend the meetings, diapers are given to participants each meeting, Holly Fritter, Healthy Start Home Visitor, said.

Holly Fritter. Submitted photo.

“We give away a packet of diapers every time they attend because we want people to be supported, and educated,” she said.

The program was created to help support moms in taking care of their babies and themselves.

“Discussions in the past have been breastfeeding, formula feeding, prenatal care, postpartum care, postpartum depression and other maternal warning signs, stages of labor and what to expect, nutrition, baby basics, parenting, things like that,” she said.

“We want people to know that they are not alone, they have someone to talk to and someone to listen.

The Southeast Kansas Multi-County Health Department is located between 6th and Lowman Streets and 6th and Horton Streets.

 

CHC/SEK consolidates curbside COVID testing 

 

CHC/SEK will consolidate curbside testing for Coronavirus beginning Jan. 12. There will remain one curbside testing location in each county served by CHC/SEK.
Curbside COVID-19 testing will be temporarily suspended at Baxter Springs, Pittsburg South (1011 Mount Carmel Place), Arma, Fort Scott primary clinic, Independence, Mound City and La Cygne clinics.
CHC/SEK will shift resources and continue curbside testing by appointment at Pittsburg North (3011 N. Michigan), Pleasanton, Iola, Coffeyville, Parsons, Columbus, Miami and Fort Scott Walk-in Care. Some locations are scheduled out several days for testing appointments.
 “It is important to note that patients who are experiencing COVID symptoms are still be able to be seen by medical staff in all clinics and tested for Coronavirus as appropriate,” said Jason Wesco, President of the CHC/SEK health system.
The change comes after the health center experienced increasing demand for testing and staffing shortages caused by COVID-19, seasonal flu and other illnesses.
“Our staff have kept our communities safe through the pandemic, but we are experiencing levels of infection unlike we ever seen” he said. “To date, our staff have delivered almost 79,000 tests and almost 63,000 vaccinations. Staff are exhausted and this measure will help protect them while ensuring that we continue to test in every county we serve while continuing other critically needed healthcare services provided by CHC/SEK.”
If you receive word of a positive COVID-19 test, put on a mask immediately. Then isolate yourself as quickly as possible, even if you don’t have symptoms.
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends isolating for at least five full days, followed by five days of wearing a mask around others, as long as you don’t have a fever and any other symptoms are improving. If you are seriously ill with COVID-19 or have a weakened immune system, the CDC recommends an isolation period of 10 to 20 days.
If you have a fever, the agency advises you to stay home until the fever resolves. If you are waiting for test results but have symptoms of Covid-19, the CDC recommends that you isolate anyway, regardless of vaccination status.

CHC/SEK said its best advice is still to get vaccinated and get boosted. Wear a mask, don’t touch your eyes or face and wash your hands frequently. Social distance as possible and most of all, absolutely stay home if you think you might be ill or potentially exposed.

 

Fort Scott’s Middle School: Masks Required

USD 234 Board of Education Building, 424 S. Main
USD234 Superintendent Ted Hessong said in an email that as of Friday, January 7, the school district had 29 student active cases and nine staff cases.

 He gave the statistics of the number of COVID positive students and staff/total number of students and staff in a building as of Friday:

Fort Scott High School= 1.52%
Fort Scott Middle School= 2.26%
Eugene Ware Elementary School = 1.88%
Winfield Scott Elementary School= 1.30%
USD 234 Preschool = 2.00%
“According to the district’s gaiting criteria, any building that has a positivity rate over two percent and the community spread is over 30 new cases, that building will need to wear masks until the positivity rate falls below 2%,” Hesson said.  “Therefore, the middle school is required to wear masks at this time until the building positivity rate falls below 2%.  The preschool is not required to wear masks at this time because they have a lower student/staff population, but we are monitoring that building’s numbers.”
The school district has provided a way to follow  USD 234’s COVID Attendance Dashboard, he said, and this information is updated daily in the afternoon.
To view the state’s COVID-19 data:
Kansas has had 566,000 cases of the virus and 7,124 deaths. Bourbon County has had 3,192 cases and 44 deaths reported, according to https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b-1-d&q=latest+covid+stats+for+bourbon+county+ks
from the New York Times.

COVID-19 Update and Status on Kansas Hospitals.

COVID-19 Courtesy photo.
The COVID-19 Update for Kansas, per Kansas Department of Health and Environment:
There have been 15,332 new cases, 15 new deaths, and 104 new hospitalizations since Monday (1/3/22).
The average age of the COVID-19 case is 39.

Rebecca Johnston, Southeast Kansas Multi-Health Department Administrator, presented a  link to a Youtube video on a presentation about the dire state that Kansas Hospitals are in right now: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nz62gGguXhw

“I urge our residents to wear a mask in large gatherings, use good hygiene, practice social distancing, get vaccinated if able and stay home when sick!” she said.

The following is the updated Kansas guidelines:

2022 Updated COVID-19 Guidelines

For General Population + K-12 Schools

January 6, 2022

IF YOU TEST POSITIVE FOR COVID-19:

ISOLATE

EVERYONE, REGARDLESS OF VACCINATION STATUS:

  • Stay home for at least 5 days
  • Stay home as long as you have symptoms. If you have a fever, continue to stay home until your fever resolves.
  • If you have no symptoms or your symptoms resolve, you can leave your house after a minimum of 5 days of isolation.
  • Continue to wear a mask around others for 5 additional days after you leave isolation.

IF YOU HAVE BEEN EXPOSED TO COVID-19:

QUARANTINE PROCEDURES

IF YOU ARE VACCINATED:

IF YOU: Have been boosted

OR

Completed the primary series of Pfizer or Moderna vaccine within the last 6 months

OR

Completed the primary series of J&J vaccines within the last 2 months

OR

Have had lab-confirmed COVID-19 within the last 90 days

YOU SHOULD:

  • Wear a mask around others for 10 days
  • Test on day 5, if possible
  • If you develop symptoms at any time, get tested and stay home.

IF YOU ARE NOT FULLY VACCINATED:

IF YOU: Completed the primary series of Pfizer or Moderna vaccine more than 6 months ago and are not boosted

OR

Completed the primary series of J&J more than 2 months ago and are not boosted

OR

Are unvaccinated

YOU SHOULD:

  • Stay home for 5 days
  • Wear a mask around others for 10 days
  • Test on day 5, if possible
  • If you develop symptoms at any time, get tested and stay home
  • Household contacts may leave home quarantine on the positive case’s day 11 as long as:
  1. the positive case has worn a mask in the home while around the household contact during their isolation
  2. the household contact is not experiencing symptoms, are fever free and wear a mask around others for the remaining 5 days

*Please note: these guidelines are not for healthcare workers or congregate settings (correctional facilities, long-term care facilities, daycares).

Health Department COVID-19 Guidelines

 

SEK Multi-County Health Department of Allen, Anderson, Bourbon, and Woodson Counties provided the following:

 

2022 Updated COVID-19 Guidelines

January 4, 2022

IF YOU TEST POSITIVE FOR COVID-19:

ISOLATE

EVERYONE, REGARDLESS OF VACCINATION STATUS:

  • Stay home for at least 5 days
  • Stay home as long as you have symptoms. If you have a fever, continue to stay home until your fever resolves.
  • If you have no symptoms or your symptoms resolve, you can leave your house after a minimum of 5 days of isolation.
  • Continue to wear a mask around others for 5 additional days after you leave isolation.

IF YOU HAVE BEEN EXPOSED TO COVID-19:

QUARANTINE PROCEDURES

IF YOU ARE VACCINATED:

IF YOU: Have been boosted

OR

Completed the primary series of Pfizer or Moderna vaccine within the last 6 months

OR

Completed the primary series of J&J vaccines within the last 2 months

YOU SHOULD:

  • Wear a mask around others for 10 days
  • Test on day 5, if possible
  • If you develop symptoms at any time, get tested and stay home.

IF YOU ARE NOT FULLY VACCINATED:

IF YOU: Completed the primary series of Pfizer or Moderna vaccine more than 6 months ago and are not boosted

OR

Completed the primary series of J&J more than 2 months ago and are not boosted

OR

Are unvaccinated

YOU SHOULD:

  • Stay home for 5 days
  • Wear a mask around others for 10 days
  • Test on day 5, if possible
  • If you develop symptoms at any time, get tested and stay home

*Please note: these guidelines are not for healthcare workers, school-aged children, or people living in congregate settings.

Kansas sees a 54% increase in drug overdoses in first 6 months of 2021 

 

TOPEKA – The Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) continues to highlight the importance of overdose prevention resources and education amid increased drug overdose deaths in 2021. Provisional surveillance results from the State Unintentional Drug Overdose Reporting System (SUDORS) show that at least 338 Kansas residents have died of drug overdose between January 1, 2021 and June 30, 2021. The tally represents a 54% increase from the 220 drug overdose deaths identified by SUDORS surveillance in the same 6-month time frame in 2020. Provisional data represents the most current estimates and is subject to change.

SUDORS collects information regarding unintentional and undetermined intent drug overdose deaths. It combines various data sources, including death certificates, medical examiner and coroner reports, and law enforcement reports to provide insight into circumstances surrounding overdose deaths. SUDORS is administered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and more information can be found on their website.

Of the provisional 338 deaths, 149 involved fentanyl or fentanyl analogs, 149 involved methamphetamine and 40 involved other licit and illicit drugs, such as cocaine, benzodiazepines and prescription opioids. More than one drug can be involved in a fatal drug overdose, so these values are not mutually exclusive.

Fentanyl continues to drive the uptick in fatal drug overdoses in Kansas. This is largely attributed to increased availability, accessibility and use of illegally manufactured fentanyl statewide. Fentanyl is a powerful synthetic opioid that is often combined with other drugs, such as heroin and cocaine, or used as a standalone drug. Due to its potency, fentanyl-involved overdoses have a fast onset and may be difficult to reverse.

There are several resources available to prevent drug overdoses. Recovery from SUD is possible. Those in need of help can call Kansas’s SUD hotline at 866-645-8216 or visit FindTreatment.gov to locate treatment services. People who use drugs and their support networks have access to naloxone and are trained in overdose recognition and naloxone administration procedures. Naloxone is a medication that reverses the effects of opioid overdoses. Kansas allows pharmacists to dispense naloxone to patients without a prescription pursuant to KAR 68-7-23. Visit ktracs.ks.gov/pharmacists/naloxone-dispensing to find a naloxone-dispensing pharmacy near you.

DCCCA, Inc. has a naloxone program that is funded by the Kansas Department of Aging and Disability Services (KDADS) through the State Opioid Response (SOR) grant. DCCCA has a limited supply of naloxone kits available for those who are unable to access it through a local pharmacy or other means. Additionally, DCCCA offers free naloxone training. Please visit dccca.org/naloxone-program for more information.

Please visit PreventOverdoseKS.org for resources, epidemiological data, and more information on Kansas’s efforts to prevent drug overdoses.

Positive Events in Fort Scott: Mayor Jones

Fort Scott Mayor Josh Jones.

Fort Scott Mayor Josh Jones said many positive events happened in the community this past year, and the city is poised for some promising events in the new year.

“A lot of things done in 2021 laid the groundwork for 2022 and we expect a lot of 2021 things to be executed in 2022,” Jones said.

The following is what Jones provided fortscott.biz as accomplishments.

In 2021, the Fort Scott City Commission:

1. Refinanced city bonds saving $15,500 per year over the next five years.
2. Passed a half-cent sales tax with 90% of revenue going towards streets and 10% going towards parks. This money will start coming in, in 2022.
3. Started an in-house safety training program saving the city $15,000 per year.
4. Utilized the Firstsource Building for  Southeast Kansas Multi-County Health Department’s giving mass vaccines during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic.
5. Put out Requests for Qualifications for a new city attorney leading to the city commission hiring a city attorney saving the city approximately $200,000 a year.
6. Approved to enter into a cost-sharing venture with the Bourbon County Commission for joint purchase of materials and equipment.
7. Approved a conditional use permit for an area south of town to allow a micro-meat processing plant to build a facility,  which will create about 30 jobs.
8. Implemented the SeeClickFix app, which allows citizens to report road problems and code nuisances.
9. Started semi-monthly roller skating sessions at Buck Run Community Center for an added amenity for the community.
10. Moved city-county emergency dispatch to the Bourbon County Courthouse.
11. Improved the beach area at Lake Fort Scott.
12. Sold the Firstsource Building for $315,000.
13. Sold four Lake Fort Scott lots for approximately $500,000.
14. Entered into a shared services agreement with Bourbon County for information technology services, saving approximately $30,000 per year.
15. Used $200,000 of American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) funds for a feasibility study for re-use of the former Mercy Hospital Building as a hospital.
16. Reworked and finalized setting up the Fort Scott Land Bank which focuses on the conversion of vacant, abandoned, tax-delinquent, or otherwise underused properties into productive use.
17. Approved $2,000 bonuses for all emergency services workers that work for the city.
18. Entered into an agreement with Bourbon County REDI (Regional Economic Development, Inc.) to provide economic development services for the City of Fort Scott,  saving approximately $100,000 a year.
19. Repaired over one mile of city sewer lines.
20. Entered into an agreement with the Kansas Department of Transportation for traffic signal upgrades in 2022 on Highway 69.
21. Was awarded a $50,000 grant from T-Mobile Internet for upgrades to the Skubitz Plaza area on the north end of historic downtown Fort Scott.

 

Bourbon County Commission Highlights For 2021

Lynne Oharah is the current chairman of the Bourbon County Commission. Submitted photo.

Bourbon County District 1 Commissioner Lynne Oharah is optimistic for the future.

“I am seeing major endeavors in economic development, improved infrastructure, and continued cost savings to the taxpayers,” Oharah said in response to questions from fortscott.biz.

“One of the major accomplishments that was achieved in 2021 is the mill levy was reduced by 1.68 mills for the 2021 budget year and 2.43 for the 2022 budget year which is a total reduction of 4.11 mills or approximately $440,000 taxpayer dollars, which is a trend that the commission is dedicated to continuing.”

A significant success this year was the asphalt program for roads.

“Our Public Works Director and his crews were able to lay 14 miles or 28 lane miles of asphalt at the depth of 2 and ½ inches which has never been accomplished in at least the last seven years,” he said. “If this trend continues through a vigorous chip and seal program coupled with increased asphalt application we are in a position to improve all of our asphalt roads.”

Additionally, the public works crews are increasing gravel production which will mean more gravel on county roads, he said.

“Although COVID-19 hit our community hard this year, the residents continued to support our local economy, “Oharah said. “Sales tax receipts were up this year, allowing us to do more projects in the road and bridge department on hard surface roads.”

“2021 saw the reorganization of BEDCO (Bourbon County Economic Development Council, Inc.) into a county-wide economic development board which was able to consolidate economic development for the county and cities, as a whole,” he said.

It is now called Bourbon County REDI  (Regional Economic Development Inc.)  and a new economic development director was hired, Rob Harrington.

“One of Rob’s first tasks was to provide a roadmap to a successful economic development program,” he said.

“Just to name one of these successes is the introduction of a  $125,000 granting program that awarded grants to the smaller communities to improve quality of life in these communities, plus a bike recreation project in Gunn Park,” he said.

Harrington, along with other individuals, is working to increase access to healthcare, which is one of the keys to the growth of Bourbon County, he said.

Oharah said the results of the hospital feasibility study will be released on January 31.

For the Bourbon County Courthouse, there have been many personnel changes.

The commission has hired Susan Bancroft as the financial/human resource director, which has been needed for many years, he said.

This position has resulted in an ability to provide the financial tracking and oversite, budget planning, program implementation, and human resource services that have been lacking, he said.

Additionally, Bancroft is working part-time for the City of Fort Scott until they can find a replacement finance director.

A new county appraiser was hired, Matt Quick.

“Matt is very good at what he does and very good at public relations,” he said.

The commissioners also hired a new county clerk,  Ashley Shelton. “Ashley has hit the road running, is personable, and a fast learner,” he said.

The county’s information technology department has been busy, as the City of Fort Scott and the county signed a contract to share the services and their costs, he said.

“The IT department worked with the 911 dispatch center to move dispatch into the old jail area at the courthouse which increases safety for this essential group,” Oharah said.  “IT is continuing to work on providing broadband access to areas of Bourbon County that are poorly served.”

“Lastly, I’m sure that you have noticed that the front steps at the courthouse have been replaced,” he said.

A few anticipated Bourbon County Commission 2022 projects:

  • Start repairs on the Elm Creek Lake dam.
  • Move all budget responsibilities under directors and elected officials.
  • Move to electronic time reporting.
  • Implement public works to handle public works projects and work orders.

“As we wrap up 2021, I want to wish our residents a happy new year and I look forward to a more prosperous year in 2022,” he said.

 

 

HAVE YOU TESTED POSITIVE OR BEEN EXPOSED TO COVID-19?

If you’ve recently tested positive for COVID-19 and have questions regarding isolation, please call:

(785)542-6625, then dial 0 for assistance.

If you have been exposed to someone with COVID-19 (close contact) and have questions about quarantine, please call:

(866)534-3463 and follow prompts. For contact tracing, dial 3.

Johnson and Johnson Vaccine No Longer Offered at Health Department

Submitted byRebecca Johnson BSN, RN

SEK Multi-County Health Department

Administrator/SEK Local Health Officer

*411 N. Washington, Iola, KS 66749

*524 S. Lowman, Ft. Scott, KS 66701

P(620)223-4464 F(620)223-1686

becky@sekmchd.com

On Wednesday, December 15, 2021, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) updated the emergency use authorization (EUA) for the Janssen/Johnson and Johnson COVID-19 vaccine with additional precautions related to a blood clotting disorder, Thrombosis with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome (TTS), observed in a wide range of recipients. On Thursday, the ACIP met and recommended that “mRNA COVID-19 vaccines are preferred over the Janssen COVID-19 vaccine for the prevention of COVID-19 for all > 18 years of age.”
Because of this update, SEK Multi-County Health Department will no longer be offering the Johnson & Johnson vaccine as a COVID-19 vaccine option.
If you have questions, please call our office. If you received a J&J primary dose and would like a booster, we will still be offering the Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines as an option. Both of these can be used as a booster for any COVID-19 vaccine primary series that has been given.
Investigation Of COVID-19 Cases Moves to State Level
KDHE will be transitioning the investigation of all COVID-19 cases from the local level to the state level. The Local Health Department will still investigate other communicable diseases as they occur, but not COVID-19. At the present, the Local Health Department works with schools and long term care facilities on COVID-19 cases as they come, on outbreaks, and on contact tracing. KDHE investigates a majority of the others, but this change will move all COVID-19 cases to the state level. We will continue to be in contact with the schools and long term care facilities until this transition is complete.

If someone has tested positive and has questions, they may call their Local Health Department, but otherwise if they would like answers on when they should return to work, school, etc. please call the COVID-19 hotline (866)534-3463.

Also, we will be adding a link to our website for COVID-19 cases by county for those interested but will no longer be able to post a weekly update of active COVID-19 cases due to this transition. Here is the link: https://coronavirus.kdheks.gov/160/COVID-19-in-Kansas

Please stay home if you are sick!!

Rebecca Johnson BSN, RN

SEK Multi-County Health Department

Administrator/SEK Local Health Officer

*524 S. Lowman, Ft. Scott, KS 66701

P(620)223-4464 F(620)223-1686

becky@sekmchd.com