Category Archives: Government

Bourbon County In A Drought Watch

Governor Updates Drought Declarations in Kansas Counties

The Governor’s Drought Team examines continued drought conditions as summer temps climb.

Topeka – While there have been some recent rains, drought conditions for many areas of Kansas continue to worsen.  Today Governor Jeff Colyer updated the Drought Declaration for Kansas counties with Executive Order 18-16 (attached).  The update includes all 105 counties either in an emergency, warning or watch status. This order places nearly half of Kansas counties in an emergency drought status.

“Kansans need to know no matter where you live in the state, the drought is not over,” said Governor Jeff Colyer.  “I’ve heard many concerns from producers and have seen the conditions first hand. We appreciate our federal partners at the Natural Resources Conservation Service as well as the Kansas Association of Conservation Districts— when we asked them to identify additional sources of assistance they responded quickly to help producers address these extreme drought conditions.”

The updated drought declaration has 50 counties in emergency status, 27 in warning status while 28 counties are in watch status. This action was recommended by Tracy Streeter, Director of the Kansas Water Office (KWO) and Chair of the Governor’s Drought Response Team.

“With reported livestock water shortages, low flows at some of our reservoirs and monthly outlooks favoring persistent drought we know it’s imperative to monitor conditions closely,” said Tracy Streeter. “Some areas of Kansas are behind more than 15 inches in moisture for the year and outlooks favor above normal temperatures and below normal precipitation in July.”

Counties in the emergency stage are eligible for emergency use of water from certain state fishing lakes due to the KWO Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Kansas Department of Wildlife (KDWPT). They also become eligible for water in some Federal reservoirs.

Individuals and communities need to contact KWO for a water supply request prior to any withdrawals from lakes. They will, in turn, be referred to the appropriate office to obtain the necessary permit to withdraw the water.

This Executive Order and any authorized upgrade shall remain in effect for those counties so identified until rescinded by Executive Order or superseded by a subsequent Executive Order revising the drought stage status of the affected counties. Effective immediately:

  • Declare a Drought Emergency, Warning or Drought Watch for the counties identified below;
  • Authorize and direct all agencies under the jurisdiction of the Governor to implement the appropriate watch or warning level-drought response actions assigned in the Operations Plan of the Governor’s Drought Response Team.

The Governor’s Drought Response Team will continue to watch the situation closely and work to minimize the effects the drought has on Kansans.

For more detailed information about current conditions, see the Kansas Climate Summary and Drought Report on the Kansas Water Office website at www.kwo.ks.gov.

County Drought Stage Declarations:

Drought Emergency: Barber, Barton, Butler, Chase, Clark, Clay, Coffey, Comanche, Cowley, Dickinson, Edwards, Ellsworth, Finney, Ford, Geary, Grant, Gray, Greenwood, Hamilton, Harper, Harvey, Haskell, Hodgeman, Kearny, Kingman, Kiowa, Lincoln, Lyon, Marion, McPherson, Meade, Morris, Morton, Osage, Ottawa, Pawnee, Pottawatomie,  Pratt, Reno, Rice, Riley, Saline, Sedgwick, Seward, Shawnee, Stafford, Stanton, Stevens, Sumner, Wabaunsee

Drought Warning: Allen, Anderson, Atchison, Brown, Chautauqua, Doniphan, Douglas, Elk, Ellis, Franklin, Greeley, Jackson, Jefferson, Lane, Leavenworth, Montgomery, Nemaha, Neosho, Ness, Rush, Russell, Scott, Trego, Wallace, Wichita, Wilson, Woodson

Drought Watch: Bourbon, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Cloud, Crawford, Decatur, Gove, Graham, Jewell, Johnson, Labette, Linn, Logan, Marshall, Miami, Mitchell, Norton, Osborne, Phillips, Rawlins, Republic, Rooks, Sheridan, Sherman, Smith, Thomas, Washington, Wyandotte

Note to Editor:  The Americans with Disabilities Act, (42 U.S.C. 12101), requires the Kansas Water Office to print the reasonable accommodations messages.

# # #

As the state’s water office, KWO conducts water planning, policy coordination and water marketing as well as facilitates public input throughout the state.

The agency prepares the KANSAS WATER PLAN, a plan for water resources development, management, and conservation.

Friday Night Concert

Cherry Jammers from Cherry Grove Baptist Church, rural Fort Scott, performed during the Friday Night Concert.

The weekly summer Friday Night Concert at Heritage Park, 1st and Main streets, downtown, was moved indoors July 6 because of the heat. Temperatures were in the 90s.

The Cherry Jammers, a singing group from Cherry Grove Baptist Church, performed in the basement of the First United Methodist Church, Third Street and National Avenue, instead.

First Behavioral Health Prevention Conference Sept. 19, 20

Kansas Prevention Collaborative Conference Slated for September

A Conference to Connect Kansas Communities

 

TOPEKA – The Kansas Prevention Collaborative (KPC), an initiative of the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services (KDADS), has scheduled a conference for September 19 and 20, 2018, marking the first behavioral health prevention conference in Kansas in many years. The conference will take place at the Capitol Plaza Hotel and Convention Center in Topeka.

 

The purpose of the conference is to empower prevention coalitions to redouble their efforts in the community. The theme, Connecting Communities, echoes what has long been the work of coalitions: bringing community members together to work toward a common goal.

 

“This conference is one of the ways we are working to strengthen our prevention efforts statewide and to empower communities to prevent avoidable tragedies and lives derailed by substance abuse,” said KDADS Secretary Tim Keck. “I encourage everyone interested in behavioral health and prevention education to participate in this event.”

 

The KPC Conference provides educational opportunities to increase awareness of emerging trends, to build skills and knowledge of ways to prevent suicide, alcohol, tobacco and drug abuse, and to advocate for best practices. Registration begins July 1. Early bird registration (before August 1) is available for $100. After August 1, registration will be $125. For more information, visit kansaspreventioncollaborative.org.

 

Andrew Brown, KDADS Prevention Program Manager, invites everyone to attend.

 

“This conference reflects the values of the Kansas Prevention Collaborative in that it will be an opportunity for community leaders and organizers to learn from one another, meet experts in the prevention field, and enable

them to connect with other prevention coalitions doing similar work,” Brown said. “At KDADS, we believe that collaboration across communities is vital to preventing tragedies such as deaths of despair, and to improving the lives of Kansans for future generations.”

 

KPC is a group of eight organizations funded by KDADS working to integrate and innovate behavioral health prevention efforts. This conference is part of KPC’s strategy to ensure that Kansans get the tools they need.

 

Chad Childs, a Prevention Project Coordinator at Wichita State University’s Community Engagement Institute, one of KPC’s partners, is enthusiastic about the implications of a Kansas-specific prevention conference.

 

“The planning committee is comprised of Kansans who value suicide and substance abuse prevention work, so this conference has been designed to be educational and practical for priorities in Kansas communities. Attendees will leave with tools for overcoming obstacles facing their community and for making connections throughout the state. The goal is to make sure they know they’re not alone and there are resources to help them along the way,” said Childs.

 

The KPC is excited to provide this learning opportunity to communities across Kansas. For more information on the conference and the work of the KPC, please visit kansaspreventioncollaborative.org.

 

Please contact the KPC at KPCTeam@wichita.edu with questions.

 

About KDADS:

The Kansas Department of Aging and Disability Services was created on July 1, 2012 by Governor Sam Brownback’s executive reorganization order that merged the former Department on Aging with the Disability and Behavioral Health Services Division from the former Department for Social and Rehabilitation Services and elements of the Health Occupations Credentialing Division at the Kansas Department of Health and the Environment. The agency administers services to older adults; administers behavioral health, addiction and prevention programs; manages the four state hospitals; administers the state’s home- and community-based services waiver programs under KanCare, the state’s Medicaid program; and directs health occupations credentialing. For interviews or media inquiries, please contact Angela de Rocha, Director of Communications, at angela.derocha@kdads.ks.gov.

 

About the Kansas Prevention Collaborative:

The Kansas Prevention Collaborative was created in 2015 to integrate and innovate behavioral health prevention efforts. A partnership of several different states, educational, and provider agencies, the KPC’s goal is to expand prevention efforts to be more inclusive of mental health promotion, suicide prevention, and problem gambling education and awareness, as well as to increase the availability of resources to adequately fund local-level prevention and promotion strategic plans. For interviews, media inquiries, or more information, please contact the Kansas Prevention Collaborative at KPCTeam@wichita.edu.

KDHE Welcomes KanCare Liaison

Kolloh Nimley

Newly-created position to bridge gaps in health care services

 

TOPEKA –  Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Secretary Jeff Andersen is pleased to welcome Kolloh Nimley to serve as the agency’s KanCare Liaison. She will work closely with the KDHE divisions of Public Health and Health Care Finance to identify gaps in health care services. She will also collaborate with contractors, stakeholders, policymakers, legislators and the general public to improve healthcare outcomes.

 

“Our Public Health and Medicaid programs serve the same populations, so it is important that we focus on comprehensive services that promote Kansans’ well-being,” said Governor Jeff Colyer. “I am pleased that we now have a designated individual who will look for data-driven solutions to assist KanCare consumers.”

 

Monday, July 2 was Nimley’s first day on the job. She has a bachelor’s degree in nursing from the University of North Dakota, a master’s in political science from the University of Oklahoma and is a doctoral candidate in healthcare administration at Franklin University in Columbus, Ohio. She has more than 19 years of experience in policy work, addressing public health, global health and health care policy in the United Kingdom, State of Minnesota and the International Medical Graduates program with the State of Minnesota, similar to Kansas’ J-1 Visa Waiver program.

 

Nimley will, among other duties, work with KanCare Managed Care Organizations (MCOs) in reviewing data related to KanCare recipients to identify gaps in coverage where an existing program may provide a benefit to consumers. She will work in the Office of the Secretary, in Topeka.

 

“We are pleased that Kolloh has joined KDHE,” said Secretary Andersen. “Her extensive education and experience will be an asset in building bridges and connectivity between the Kansas Medicaid program and public health offerings—contributing to our efforts to take a more holistic approach to the healthcare of Kansans.”

KDHE’s Division of Public Health includes the following bureaus: Community Health Systems, Disease Control and Prevention, Epidemiology and Public Health Informatics, Family Health, Health Promotion, Oral Health and the Center for Performance Management.

KDHE’s Division of Health Care Finance includes KanCare, Electronic Health Records, Medicaid Program Integrity, the State Employee Health Plan, Office of Inspector General, Projections and Informatics, and Health Information Technology and the Health Information Exchange.

 

The KanCare Liaison is different from the KanCare Ombudsman position, which is designed to assist KanCare consumers directly with case-specific concerns.

Tyson Endorsed by Farm Bureau

Caryn Tyson Honored By Kansas Farm Bureau’s Endorsement of Her Candidacy

 

(PARKER, KS) – Caryn Tyson, a Kansas State Senator running for the Kansas 2nd Congressional District, released the following statement today regarding her endorsement from the Kansas Farm Bureau.

 

“Agriculture is an essential part of the Kansas economy and it is an essential part of my life. My husband, Tim, and I are fifth generation Kansans who own a ranch in Linn County. I’m proud to be a rancher, proud to be a Kansan, and proud to be endorsed by the Kansas Farm Bureau. I’m truly honored by their support and look forward to being a champion for Kansas’ farmers and ranchers in Congress,” Tyson said.

 

Caryn Tyson has degrees in mathematics and computer science from Kansas State and a master’s degree in engineering management from KU. After graduating she began working in the Information Technology industry and continued working in this field for more than 25 years. Caryn’s work included space shuttle support for NASA where she received awards for achievement and teamwork.

 

Caryn and her husband, Tim – both fifth-generation Kansans – own and operate Tyson Ranch in Linn County, established in 1871 by Tim’s great-great-grandfather.

New Trucks Being Considered For Fort Scott Fire Department

Firefighter Travis Mewhinney stands next to the ladder truck that is to be replaced in 2019 if the city commission approves it this month.

The 1993 model ladder truck the Fort Scott Fire Department has is in need of replacement.

“We have to worry about the liability of that truck,” Fire Chief Paul Ballou said. “It’s past 25 years old…The ladder truck passed its’ certification, but it’s past its’ 25 years life…We are trying to get everything out of them that we can.”

Ballou expressed concerns about getting replacement parts for vehicles that old.

Newer models have longer ladders and more seats for firefighters

“This (ladder) is 75 feet,” Firefighter Travis Mewhinney said. “The one we are looking at (for replacement) is around 100 feet.”

“It seats three firefighters and a driver,” Mewhinney said. “The new one seats five firefighters and a driver.”

The ladder truck has been used to assist with training and fires with multi-story buildings.

“Like Victorian homes,” Ballou said. “Where you can’t get a ground ladder up to the roof.”

“It was used on the downtown fire (in 2005), and has been used in Nevada and Pleasanton in mutual aid (to their firefighters),” Mehinney said.

While the ladder truck is used less, the pumper truck is used virtually every day.

“The E1 pumper truck, a 1997, is used all the time,” Mewhinney said.

Jon Garrison, Fort Scott Director of Finance gave a preliminary budget update for the 2019 budget at the city commission meeting June 19, according to the unapproved city minutes.

Garrison stated there are two big projects coming up for consideration: the River Intake Structure which will cost approximately $5,000,000 and the purchase of two fire trucks – a  ladder truck and a pumper truck which will amount to approximately $1,500,000, according to the unapproved minutes.

“A ladder truck averages close to $800,000 to $1 million,” Chief Ballou said. “A pumper truck is $305,000 to $450,000.”

Garrison desires to have a budget work session before the July 17 city commission meeting, with the 2019 budget being approved at the August 7 meeting, according to the unapproved minutes.

Fort Scott Fire Department’s E1  pumper truck, used virtually every day, is also in need of replacement.

Flags Half-Staff For Victims of Shooting

Governor Colyer Orders Flags to Be Flown at Half-Staff in Honor of Victims of Capital Gazette Shooting

Topeka – The White House, this morning issued a directive to lower flags to half-staff.

Following the directive of President Donald Trump, in accordance with Executive Order 10-12, Kansas Governor Jeff Colyer has ordered all flags to be flown at half-staff from now until sundown July 3, 2018 as a mark of respect for the victims of the terrible act of violence perpetrated on June 28, 2018 at the Capital Gazette newspaper in Annapolis, Maryland.

“I pray for the families and loved ones of this terrible tragedy.  The news media perform an important duty in our society and should never have to fear losing their lives in the course of that duty,” said Governor Jeff Colyer.

To subscribe to receive email alerts when the Governor orders flags to half-staff, please visit http://governor.ks.gov/subscribe-to-flag-honors.

Dept. of Revenue: $1.2 billion More For Kansas

 

 

TOPEKA—Fiscal year-end tax receipts came in $1.21 billion above last year, and $317.81 million over fiscal year predictions, according to the latest revenue report released Monday.

 

Year-end tax receipts were bolstered by a more than 20 percent increase in June collections, with $133.02 million over last year, which was $143.79 million more than expected for the month.

 

“With tax receipts coming in above expectations every month during the last year, there’s optimism that this trend will continue,” Secretary Sam Williams said. “The increase in sales tax collections indicate more retail spending precipitated by wage gains from the federal tax cuts passed into law six months ago.”

 

Fiscal year retail sales tax collections took in $55.82 million more than last year. For the month, sales tax collections came in $6.98 million more than last June, which was $10.76 million more than expectations for the month.

 

Individual income tax continues to demonstrate strong performance above expectations, with fiscal year collections at $229.42 million more than predicted for the year, and $1.07 billion above last year. Individual income tax collections for the month came in $114.03 million more than last June’s receipts.

Bourbon County Commission Agenda July 3

Agenda

Bourbon County Commission Room

2nd Floor, County Courthouse

210 S. National Avenue

Fort Scott, KS 66701

Tuesdays starting at 9:00

 

Date: July 3rd, 2018

1st District-Lynne Oharah Minutes: Approved: _______________

2nd District-Jeff Fischer Corrected: _______________

3rd District-Nick Ruhl Adjourned at: _______________

County Clerk-Kendell Mason

9:00-9:45-Jim Harris

10:30-10:15-Gaylen Garrison-Family Heritage Insurance

10:30-11:00-Clint Anderson and Justin Meeks-Job description employment

11:00-12:00-Justin Meeks

11:00-11:15-Executive Session- Privileged in the attorney-client relationship

11:15-11:30-Executive Session-Safety and security of the Courthouse

12:00-1:30-Commissioners gone to lunch

1:30-2:00-Jacqie Spradling

2:00-2:15-Shane Walker-2019 IT Budget

Justifications for Executive Session:

          Personnel matters of individual non-elected personnel

          Consultation with an attorney for the body or agency which would be deemed privileged in the attorney-client relationship

          Matters relating to employer-employee negotiations whether or not in consultation with the representative(s) of the body or agency

          Confidential data relating to financial affairs or trade secrets of corporations, partnerships, trusts and individual proprietorships

          Preliminary discussions relating to the acquisition of real property

          Matters relating to the security of a public body or agency, public building or facility or the information system of a public body or agency, if the discussion of such matters at an open meeting would jeopardize the security of such public body, agency, building, facility or information system

Hilderbrand Endorsed By Kansas Farm Bureau

KANSAS SENATOR RICHARD HILDERBRAND RECEIVES

ENDORSEMENT FROM KANSAS FARM BUREAU

GALENA- Kansas Senator Richard Hilderbrand (R-Galena) received the endorsement of the Kansas Farm Bureau, an advocacy group that works to strengthen agriculture through the support of farmers and ranchers.

“I am honored to receive this important endorsement,” Hilderbrand said. “If elected, I will continue to advocate for Kansas’ agriculture industry and work to secure and protect our farmers’ interests.”

The Kansas Farm Bureau’s Voters Organized to Elect Farm Bureau Friends (VOTE FBF) Political Action Committee (PAC) released its election candidate endorsements for state and federal races last Friday.

Rescuing The Vulnerable From a Vehicle

On a 90-degree day, the interior of a parked car can soar to over 115 degrees within 15 minutes, according to a press release from the Kansas Department of Health and Environment. Cracking a window has been proven to not help

As of July 1 people who see people or animals who have been left locked unattended in parked cars and try to rescue them, will be given protection from lawsuits.

“If someone see’s a child or animal in a locked vehicle, and that person believes that they are in danger, they can break a window to help that animal or child without fear of being liable for the damages or for being prosecuted,” Kansas Senator Richard Hilderbrand told FortScott.Biz.

The law was signed by the governor in April and became effective, Sunday, July 1.

House Bill 2516 provides immunity from civil liability for damage to a motor vehicle for a person who enters the vehicle, by force or otherwise, to remove a vulnerable person or domestic animal if they are in imminent danger.

The following is a press release from the Kansas Department of Health and Environment:

On average, 37 children and over three dozen animals die in a hot car each year in the United States. Hot car-related injuries and deaths are 100 percent predictable and 100 percent preventable.

The Humane Society Legislative Fund (HSLF) of Kansas, KidsAndCars.org and Safe Kids Kansas (sponsored in part by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment) joined together on Monday, June 25, to discuss the new law that goes into Sunday, July 1. It passed during the 2018 Legislative session. The Hot Cars Law gives good Samaritans in Kansas the legal right (under certain conditions) to break a window to help a vulnerable person or animal trapped inside a hot car.

On a 90-degree day, the interior of a parked car can soar to over 115 degrees within 15 minutes. Cracking a window has been proven to not help.

Experts say the most dangerous mistake a parent or animal owner can make is to assume leaving a child or animal alone in a parked car is a safe option, even for just a few minutes.

Already this year, there have been 18 confirmed child deaths in hot cars. A child’s body can overheat three to five times faster than an adult’s, and since animals cannot sweat the way we do, they are unable to regulate their internal body temperature as effectively.

An animal or child can sustain brain damage, organ damage or failure and death from a vehicular heatstroke within minutes of being trapped.

The new law will empower the Kansas community to act fast and safely to help rescue a vulnerable person or animal trapped in a hot car.

Before you can exercise your right to intervene, the following must be checked:

  • Is the car locked?
  • Is the person or animal suffering in imminent danger?
  • Have you notified local law enforcement?
  • Are you using reasonable force to break entry?
  • Can you remain with the person or animal until law enforcement arrives?
  • Is the animal in question domestic? This law does not apply to livestock animals.

Kansas joins 21 other states who protect good Samaritans from legal retribution for assisting people or animals in imminent danger when trapped in a hot car.

For further information, please contact KidsAndCars.org: Amber Rollins, 913-732-2792, Amber@KidsandCars.org; or HSLF of Kansas: Miranda Pratt, 417-294-4048, Miranda@hslfkansas.org.

 

Fort Scott Commission Minutes June 19

CITY OF FORT SCOTT

CITY COMMISSION MEETING

Minutes of June 19, 2018 Regular Meeting #12

The regular meeting of the Fort Scott City Commission was held June 19th, 2018 at 6:00 p.m. in the City Commission Room, 123 S. Main, Fort Scott, Kansas.

ROLL CALL:

Commissioners Adamson, Nichols, and Parker were present with President of the City Commission, Bartelsmeyer, presiding. Mayor Mitchell was absent.

INVOCATION: Pastor Steve Cole, First United Methodist Church, said a prayer asking God for guidance for the City and all government and City officials.

AUDIENCE IN ATTENDANCE: Janet Braun, Denton Wescoat, Steve Cole, Bobby Duncan, Alyssa Rice, Deb Needleman, Kenny Howard, Darrell Parker, Kaylea Manwiller, Spenser Johnson, Rachel Pruitt, Kenny Howard, Rhonda Dunn, Travis Shelton, Lynne Oharah, Lindsay Madison, Rhonda Dunn, Steve Buerge, Jana Walker, Paul Ballou, Clayton Miller, and Jason Silvers, representing the Fort Scott Tribune.

PROCLAMATIONS/RECOGNITIONS: None

APPROVAL OF MINUTES AND APPROPRIATIONS/CONSENT AGENDA:

  1. Approval of minutes of the regular meeting of June 5th, 2018.

  1. Approval of Appropriation Ordinance 1217-A totaling $309,518.34.

  1. Fireworks Waiver – July 4th, 2018

  1. Parade Permit – Burke Street Parade – July 4th, 2018

  1. Cereal Malt Beverage Application – Lady Elks Lodge #579 – June 23rd, 2018 – Briggs Car Show

Parker moved to approve the Consent Agenda. Adamson seconded. All voted aye.

APPROVED CONSENT AGENDA.

APPEARANCE/COMMENTS/PUBLIC HEARING:

  1. APPEARANCE: Jana Walker – Closure of Burke Street – Jana Walker appeared before the Commission to request Burke Street be closed on July 4th from 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 a.m. from 10th and Burke to Lakin Drive. They plan to have a big block neighborhood party. She has visited with Chief Shelton, Chad Brown and also the City Manager about this. They plan to have activities all day after the parade in the morning and then a cookout in the early evening and ending with fireworks.

City Manager asked the Commission to allow City staff to work with the organizers to close the needed streets for this event.

Nichols moved to approve the closure of Burke Street and allow City staff to work with the organizers to close any other needed streets on July 4th, 2018 from 10th and Burke to Lakin Drive from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 a.m. Bartelsmeyer seconded. All voted aye.

approveD the closure of Burke Street AND allow City staff to work with the organizers to close any other needed streets on July 4th, 2018 from 10th and Burke to Lakin Drive from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 A.m.

B. CITIZEN COMMENTS (Concerning Items Not on Agenda – 3 minute

limit per citizen) – Bobby Dennis – Mr. Dennis appeared to speak on behalf of the Beaux Arts Center and the code footprint and the closing of the business which they chose to do. He asked the City to retract the code footprint which was not needed.

City Manager said that the City did not close the business or shut them down. The City has been willing to work with them. The City will not retract the code footprint.

  1. PUBLIC HEARINGS:

Parker moved to open the Public Hearing at 6:22 p.m. Nichols seconded. Motion carried.

OPENED PUBLIC HEARING AT 6:22 P.M.

6:15 p.m. Resolution 30-2018 directing the repair or removal of an unsafe and dangerous structure and accessory structure located at 211 N. Lincoln Street – Rhonda Dunn, Code Director, informed the Commission that this structure has had a fire in it in the past. The property owner has been very cooperative and informed her that they are not able to make repairs to the structure. The house has significant termite damage. There has been no water to this structure since February 2016 and the house is vacant. She recommended allowing 30 days to repair or remove this structure.

Nichols moved to approve Resolution No. 30-2018 authorizing this structure be repaired or removed in 10 days. Parker seconded. All voted aye.

APPROVED RESOLUTION NO. 30-2018 DIRECTING THE REPAIR OR REMOVAL OF AN UNSAFE AND DANGEROUS STRUCTURE LOCATED AT 211 N. LINCOLN STREET. STRUCTURE MUST BE BROUGHT UP TO 2012 INTERNATIONAL BUILDING CODE BY JULY 6TH, 2018 OR DEMOLITION PROCEEDINGS WILL BEGIN.

6:15 p.m. Resolution 26-2018 directing the repair or removal of an unsafe and dangerous structure located at 1306 E. Wall Street – Rhonda Dunn, Code Director, informed the Commission that this property was on a contract to sell from the owner to another person. That person attempted to put a roof on the structure. The back of the structure is in bad condition and the roof in the back is in disrepair. The eves and soffits on the house are in disrepair. The back yard is a mess and if this structure is removed the mess that was left will be cleaned up also.

Adamson moved to approve Resolution No. 26-2018 authorizing this structure be repaired or removed in 30 days. Bartelsmeyer seconded. All voted aye.

APPROVED RESOLUTION NO. 26-2018 DIRECTING THE REPAIR OR REMOVAL OF AN UNSAFE AND DANGEROUS STRUCTURE LOCATED AT 1306 E. WALL STREET. STRUCTURE MUST BE BROUGHT UP TO 2012 INTERNATIONAL BUILDING CODE BY JULY 27TH, 2018 OR DEMOLITION PROCEEDINGS WILL BEGIN.

Bartelsmeyer moved to close the Public Hearing at 6:27 p.m. Parker seconded. All voted aye.

CLOSED PUBLIC HEARING AT 6:27 P.M.

CONSIDERATION:

  1. Consideration of placing stone at Heritage Park in front of rose garden in memory of Dola Cress – Lindsay Madison, Executive Director, Fort Scott Area Chamber of Commerce, informed the Commission that back in 2007 the Bourbon County Garden Club recognized community member Dola Cress for her years of service in leading the PRIDE organization in Fort Scott and other community volunteer efforts. This recognition was done thought a wooden marker that was staked in the flower bed area at Heritage Park, located at 1st and Main dedicating the rose bushes in her name. It was noted a few years ago that this marker was missing. A metal plaque was then engraved with the following: In honor of PRIDE – Community – Dola’s Rose Garden – Dedicated 2007 – Dola Cress. Dola and her daughter were not pleased with the metal plaque and further asked if they could have her name etched in the limestone at the park with Geneva & Sons doing the etching work which would be paid for by Dola’s daughter.

City Manager cautioned the Commission that they could be setting a precedence with other individuals wanting the etching in limestone there also.

Commissioner Bartelsmeyer said that she has seen some really nice brass plaques.

City Manager asked for approval for he and Lindsay Madison to work together to find a nice plaque to place in the rose garden area.

Bartelsmeyer moved to authorize the City Manager and Lindsay Madison to work together to find a nice plaque for the rose garden area. Adamson seconded. All voted aye.

authorizeD the City Manager and Lindsay Madison TO work together to find a nice plaque for the rose garden area.

  1. Consideration of appointment – Fort Scott Housing Authority Board – Diane Clay, City Clerk, informed the Commission that two letters of interest were received for the open position vacated by Dan Meara on the Housing Authority Board. Darrell Parker and Deborah Apfel both submitted letters of interest. These letters were sent to the Housing Authority and they have recommended the appointment of Darrell Parker to this position.

Nichols moved to approve to appoint Darrell Parker to the Fort Scott Housing Authority Board. Adamson seconded. Adamson, Nichols and Bartelsmeyer voted aye. Parker abstained. Motion carried.

APPROVED TO APPOINT DARRELL PARKER TO THE FORT SCOTT HOUSING AUTHORITY BOARD TO REPLACE THE VACATED POSITION OF DANIEL MEARA.

  1. Consideration of OCR Letter – City Manager said that he has been working with Bob Beckham, Superintendent, U.S.D. 234 on the Title 9 complaint. Mr. Beckham needs to send some documentation to the State. This letter, compiled by the City Attorney, states that the City has no plans to building a club house or dressing room at this time at Fisher Park as there are no funds available for this. The City is not involved in the Title 9 complaint.

Parker moved to approve the OCR letter to USD 234. Adamson seconded. All voted aye.

APPROVED OCR LETTER TO USD 234.

  1. Consideration of approval of AWOS upgrade grant from K.D.O.T. for Airport – Rachel Pruitt, Economic Development Director, along with Kenny Howard, Airport Director, informed the Commission that the City has received a grant from K.D.O.T. for AWOS upgrades at the Airport in the amount of $109,060. There is a 10% match from the City which would amount to $12,118. This is a budgeted item.

Kenny stated that the AWOS upgrade is badly needed at the Airport as the current system is about 19 years old.

Parker moved to approve the K.D.O.T. grant in the amount of $109,600 for the AWOS upgrades at the Airport with the City match being $12,118.00. Adamson seconded. All voted aye.

approved the K.D.O.T. grant in the amount of $109,600 for the AWOS upgrades at the Airport with the City match being $12,118.00.

  1. Consideration of approval of PAPI & REIL grant from K.D.O.T. for Airport – Rachel Pruitt, Economic Development Director, along with Kenny Howard, Airport Director, informed the Commission that the City received a K.D.O.T. grant for the PAPI & REIL upgrades at the Airport in the amount of $177,462. The City match is $19,718. The PAPI and REIL is runway lighting.

Discussion was held regarding the expansion of the Airport and how this lighting would be affected.

Kenny stated that the grant can be delayed if the expansion occurs.

Rachel stated that she is applying for another grant for the expansion in July.

Nichols moved to approve the PAPI and REIL runway lighting grant in the amount of $177,462 with the City match being $19,718 for the Airport. Bartelsmeyer seconded. All voted aye.

approveD the PAPI and REIL runway lighting K.D.O.T. grant in the amount of $177,462 with the City match being $19,718 for the Airport.

  1. Consideration of Change Order #1 – Regional Tourism Center – $1,315.00 – Rachel Pruitt, informed the Commission that this change order is for an additional $1,315.00 which is due to an additional piece of countertop, the unexpected stripping of wallpaper and skimming the wall and power sanding. Approval was recommended.

Adamson moved to approve the Change Order #1 in the amount of $1,315.00 to Great Expectations. Nichols seconded. All voted aye.

APPROVED CHANGE ORDER #1 IN THE ADDITIONAL AMOUNT OF $1,315.00 TO GREAT EXPECTATIONS.

  1. Consideration of Land Bank Ordinance No. 3535 adoption

  • Appointment of Land Bank Manager

  • Approval of Establishment of Land Bank Board of Trustees

Rhonda Dunn, Community Development Director, informed the Commission that she is seeking approval of the Ordinance to adopt the Land Bank. She told them that the Land Bank is a special purpose governmental entity that focuses on the conversion of vacant, abandoned, tax delinquent, and foreclosed properties into productive use. There are currently 11 land banks in Kansas. She explained the goals and strategies of a land bank. She explained reasons why a land bank can be effective. She checked with the City’s insurance carrier, KCAMP, and said that if the City moves forward with the establishment of the Land Bank, the Land Bank does not need to be insured separately from the City. She asked the City Commission to approve the Ordinance adopting the Land Bank, authorize the City Manager to appoint a Land Bank Manager, and approve the organization of the Land Bank Board of Trustees which is seven members. She recommended the City Commission serve as the Land Bank Board of Trustees and that their terms run consecutively with their terms of office. She also recommended a representative from Bourbon County Board of Commissioners, and a representative from Bourbon County Economic Development Council, Inc.

Nichols moved to approve the adoption of Ordinance No. 3535 creating a Land Bank for the City of Fort Scott, approving the Land Bank Manager as Rhonda Dunn, and approving the Land Bank Board of Trustees as the five City Commissioners along with a representation of the Bourbon County Board of Commissioners and a representative from Bourbon County Economic Development Council, Inc. Parker seconded. All voted aye.

approveD the adoption of Ordinance No. 3535 creating a Land Bank for the City of Fort Scott, approving the Land Bank Manager as Rhonda Dunn, and approving the Land Bank Board of Trustees as the five City Commissioners along with a representation of the Bourbon County Board of Commissioners and a representative from Bourbon County Economic Development Council, Inc.

APPROVED ORDINANCE NO. 3535 CREATING ARTICLE 14 OF THE FORT SCOTT MUNICIPAL CODE FOR THE PURPOSE OF CREATING THE FORT SCOTT LAND BANK, AND DETERMINING THE MEMBERSHIP, DUTIES AND FUNCTIONS OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE FORT SCOTT LAND BANK.

8. Consideration of changing FSA (Flexible Spending Account) vendor – Deb Needleman, Human Resource Director, informed the Commission that the current vendor for the City’s flexible spending account is TASC and the cost is $5.99 per participant per month plus a $169.00 annual renewal fee. She proposed that the City change to HelloFurther who has a relationship with Blue Cross/Blue Shield of Kansas. This would streamline our process by having the FSA and HAS with the same vendor. The price would drop to $4.50 per participant per month with no annual renewal fee or set up charge. This change in vendor would save the City $619.00 per year.

Adamson approved to change the flexible spending account vendor from TASC to HelloFurther saving the City $619.00 per year. Bartelsmeyer seconded. All voted aye.

APPROVED TO CHANGE THE FLEXIBLE SPENDING ACCOUNT VENDOR TO HELLOFURTHER SAVING THE CITY $619.00 PER YEAR.

COMMISSION/STAFF:

  1. Director Updates: Jon Garrison – Mr. Garrison gave a preliminary budget update for the 2019 budget. He relayed the increase in costs in KPERS and KP&F benefits and the Work Comp increased expense. There is a 3% increase currently budgeted for employee salaries. There are two big projects coming up: River Intake Structure which will cost approximately $5,000,000 and the purchase of two fire trucks – an aerial ladder truck and the pumper truck which will amount to approximately $1,500,000. He is looking to have a budget work session before the July 17th City Commission meeting with the 2019 budget being approved at the August 7th, 2018 meeting.

B. City Commission:

Adamson Nothing to report.

Bartelsmeyer Nothing to report.

Nichols Nothing to report.

Parker – Nothing to report.

Mitchell Not present.

C. City Attorney: Nothing to report.

  1. Director of Finance: Nothing to report.

  1. City Manager:

  1. City Manager informed the Commission that U.S.D. 234 school will begin on August 23rd, 2018. He asked the Commission to approve the closing of the Aquatic Center on August 12th.

Parker moved to close the Aquatic Center for the summer on August 12th, 2018. Bartelsmeyer seconded. All voted aye.

APPROVED TO CLOSE THE AQUATIC CENTER FOR THE SUMMER ON AUGUST 12TH, 2018.

  1. Unemployment rate – City Manager stated that our unemployment rate is currently 3.8%. There are only 271 people not employed.

  1. Project List – Rachel Pruitt gave the Commissioners a project list of all the completed projects that have been completed through June 13th, 2018.

ADJOURNMENT:

Parker moved to adjourn the meeting at 7:27 p.m. Nichols seconded. All voted aye.

ADJOURNED MEETING AT 7:27 P.M.

The next regularly scheduled meeting is to be held on July 3rd, 2018 at 6:00 p.m.

RECORDED BY:

____________________

DIANE K. CLAY

CITY CLERK