Category Archives: Fort Scott Community College

In Celebration of Martin Luther King Jr.: Lunch and Learn

There will be a Lunch and Learn about segragation practices in Wichita in the 1950s on Monday, January 17th, 2022, from 12 p.m. – 1 p.m. at the Danny and Willa Ellis Family Fine Arts Center on the campus of Fort Scott Community College.

Attendance is free.

Lunch provided by Luther’s BBQ (visitors may bring their own lunch)
Drinks and desserts provided by Great Western Dining.

The event is called Martin Luther King, Jr.  Lunch and Learn  “Dockum Drugstore Sit-In”

The presentation explores Wichita’s Dockum Drugstore Sit-In
Guest Speaker is  Prisca Barnes.

In July 1958, Black Students gathered at Wichita’s Dockum Drugstore to stage a peaceful protest against the unequal practice of segregation. Although this protest was not publicized in the newspapers in 1958, the students participating in the demonstration worked to gain access to public spaces, like movie theaters and restaurants. This presentation discusses the details of the sit-in, explores how these protests helped transform the struggle for racial equality, and considers contemporary non-violent protests.

Prisca Barnes is the founder of Storytime Village, Inc., a nonprofit organization in Wichita that promotes reading among low-income children and families. She is a passionate advocate for equity in education and literacy.

“The Dockum Drugstore Sit-In” is part of Humanities Kansas’s Movement of Ideas Speakers Bureau, featuring presentations and workshops designed to share stories that inspire, spark conversations that inform, and generate insights that strengthen civic engagement.

For more information about “The Dockum Drugstore Sit-In” contact the Gordon Parks Museum.

Gordon Parks Museum to celebrate the life of Martin Luther King Jr.

Gordon Parks Museum is located on the campus of Fort Scott Community College.

The Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration will be held, with several events planned in Fort Scott.

The events will start on Thursday, January 13th at the Danny & Willa Ellis Family Fine Arts Center.

The day will include with hosting of the Fort Scott Area Chamber Coffee at 8:00 am and later that evening, a free ballet tribute performance at 7:00 pm by The Kansas City Friends of Alvin Ailey: Ever Present.

This is a tribute in honor of Martin Luther King and Gordon Parks. This performance is funded by the Fort Scott Area Community Foundation.

CELEBRATING THE LIFE OF MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR.

Thursday, January 13th – Tribute to Martin
7 p.m. – Alvin Ailey’s Kansas City Dance Group Ballet Performance
Gordon Parks: Tribute to Martin Luther King (FREE Event) – Ellis Fine Arts Center • Doors open at 6 p.m. • Reception to follow, which includes a meet and greet with performers and drinks and refreshments

Friday, January 14th – Celebrating Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Birthday
9 a.m. – Film Showing: Eyes on the Prize: American Civil Rights – “Awakenings (1954-1956)” • Murder of Emmett Till &
Montgomery Bus Boycott

12 p.m. – Lunch & Learn – Martin Luther King, Jr. Birthday Celebration • Dramatic reading of the speech “I have a Dream” by
Fort Scott Community College students and members of the community • Balloons will be released • Birthday cake, soup,
dessert, and drinks will be available for free • Photo Promotion taken with “I Stand For” sign

1:30 p.m. – Film Showing: Eyes on the Prize: American Civil Rights – “Fighting Back (1957-1962)” • Central High School and Little Rock Nine & James Meredith and The University of Mississippi

3:30 p.m. – Film Showing: Eyes on the Prize: American Civil Rights – “Ain’t Scared of Your Jails (1960-1961)” • Nashville Sit-Ins and Boycotts & Freedom Riders”

Monday, January 17th – Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday Celebration Event

9 a.m. – 2 p.m. – Food Drive – Join us as we will collect canned and non-perishable food items to donate to the Beacon in
Fort Scott • Anyone in the community is invited to drop off canned food

9 a.m. – Film Showing: Eyes on the Prize: American Civil Rights – “No Easy Walk (1961-1963)” • Albany, Georgia, Birmingham, Alabama & The March on Washington

10:30 a.m. – Film Showing: Eyes on the Prize: American Civil Rights – “Mississippi: Is this America? (1962-1964)” • Medgar Evers & ‘Mississippi Burning’ Murders

12 p.m. – Lunch & Learn – “The Dockman Drugstore Sit-In” presentation by Prisca Barnes • Barbeque lunch, drinks, and
dessert will be available for free (guests may also bring their own lunch)

1:30 p.m. – Film Showing: “Martin”, A tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. by Gordon Parks – This is a ballet tribute to Dr. King, written and directed by Gordon Parks
For more information, please call (620) 223-2700 ext. 5850

Funding provided by:
FSACF serves to fulfill philanthropic goals that benefit the common good and improve quality of life by providing leadership and programming that is responsive to the interests and needs of
the residents of the Fort Scott area.

All events will be held at the Ellis Fine Arts Center (2108 S. Horton St., Fort Scott, KS)

A reception will follow the performance with light refreshments hosted by Great Western Dining.

On Friday, January 14th, the community is invited to the Ellis Fine Arts Center for a free Lunch and Learn event that will be held at 12:00 pm featuring a dramatic reading of the “I have a dream” speech by FSCC students and members of the community.

 

The Fort Scott Community College Endowment Foundation is a key contributor to the celebration events. All events will take place at both the Gordon Parks Museum and Ellis Fine Arts Center.

A full list of film showings and events can be found at https://www.gordonparkscenter.org/events. For more information call the Gordon Parks Museum at 620-223-2700 ext. 5850.

FSCC Agenda for Dec. 13

December 13, 2021
Board of Trustees
Fort Scott Community College
2108 S. Horton
Fort Scott, KS 66701
The Board of Trustees of Fort Scott Community College will meet in regular session on Monday, December 13, 2021. The meeting will be held in Cleaver-Burris-Boileau Hall at Fort Scott Community College.

5:00 p.m. Dinner in Cleaver-Burris-Boileau Hall at 5:00 followed by regular board meeting at 5:30 p.m.

THE AGENDA
5:00 DINNER
5:30 ROLL CALL, 3
PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE
CALL TO ORDER, 4
A. Comments from the Chair, 4
B. Comments from the Public, 4
C. KACCT Quarterly Update, 4
CONSENT AGENDA, 5
A. Approval of Agenda, 5
B. Approval of Minutes of previous Regular Board Meeting conducted on November 8, 2021, 6
C. Approval of Treasurer’s Report, Bills, and Claims, 7
D. Approval of Personnel Actions, 5
ACTION/DISCUSSION ITEMS, 54
A. Discussion of KASB Board Training and Retreat/Worksession, 54
B. Appointment of Public Information Officer, 55
C. Discussion of Open Records Request Policy, 55
D. Appointment of Title IX Coordinator, 56
E. Consideration of Bailey Hall Bids, 57
F. Consideration of Turf Financing COP, 59
ITEMS FOR REVIEW, 64
REPORTS, 66
A. Administrative Updates, 67
EXECUTIVE SESSION, 79
ADJOURNMENT, 80
1
• December 13, 2021:
• December 17, 2021 – January 4, 2022
• January 7, 2022:
• January 12, 2022:
• January 17, 2022:
• January 24, 2022:
• February 21, 2022:
• March 14 – 18, 2022:
• March 21, 2022:
• March 25, 2022:
• April 12, 2022:
• April 15, 2022:
• April 18, 2022:
• May 6, 2022:
• May 7, 2022:
• May 10 – 13, 2022:
• May 14, 2022:
• May 16, 2022:
• May 30, 2022:
• June 20, 2022:
• July 16, 2022:

Sincerely,
John Bartelsmeyer, Chair
Alysia Johnston, President

FSCC’s vision for the future is to support “Students First, Community Always” through a central focus on teaching and learning; advancing strong, innovative programs and
departments; maximizing and leveraging opportunities; initiating efficient and effective processes; and developing the region’s workforce.

CALL TO ORDER
A. COMMENTS FROM THE CHAIR
B. COMMENTS FROM THE PUBLIC
C. KACCT QUARTERLY UPDATE
4
CONSENT AGENDA
A. APPROVAL OF AGENDA
B. APPROVAL OF MINUTES OF PREVIOUS MEETINGS
1) Attached are the minutes of the Regular Board Meeting conducted on November
8, 2021.
C. APPROVAL OF TREASURER’S REPORT, BILLS and CLAIMS
Attached are the Treasurer’s Report and the Bills and Claims Report.
D. APPROVAL OF PERSONNEL ACTIONS

1) Additions
a) Cara Folsom, Athletic Training Technician, effective January 1, 2022

2) Separations
a) Tyler Nelson, Assistant Football Coach, effective November 9, 2021
b) Shane Stafford, Assistant Football Coach, effective November 16, 2021
c) Jade Johnson, Financial Aid Assistant, effective December 31, 2021

To see the complete package:
12.13.21 Consent Agenda

FSCC Board Minutes of Nov. 8

FORT SCOTT COMMUNITY COLLEGE
Minutes of the Board of Trustees Meeting
November 8, 2021
PRESENT: John Bartelsmeyer, Dave Elliott, Jim Fewins, Kirk Hart, Bill Meyer, and Robert Nelson
ALSO PRESENT: Alysia Johnston, President, Juley McDaniel, Board Clerk, faculty, and staff
Chairman Bartelsmeyer called the meeting to order at 5:30 pm in Cleaver-Burris-Boileau Hall. The meeting was opened
with the Pledge of Allegiance.
COMMENTS FROM THE CHAIR: None.
CONSENT AGENDA: A motion was made by Meyer, seconded by Fewins, and carried by unanimous vote to approve
the consent agenda.
ACTION/DISCUSSION ITEMS:
A. A motion was made by Fewins seconded by Elliot and carried by unanimous vote to approve rescheduling the
notice of sale and close dates for the baseball and softball turf fields to December 13 and January 5.
ITEMS FOR REVIEW: The Board reviewed letters of correspondence.
REPORTS:
A. ADMINISTRATIVE UPDATES: The Board reviewed and heard reports from Student Services, Student Affairs
Instruction, Finance and Operations, and the President.
EXECUTIVE SESSION: A motion was made by Nelson, seconded by Fewins, and carried by unanimous vote to adjourn
to executive session for 30 minutes beginning at 6:15 pm to discuss data relating to financial affairs or trade secrets of
corporations, partnerships, trusts, and individual proprietorships as it relates to athletic programming, with action expected
to follow. The Board invited Alysia Johnston and Tom Havron into executive session. At 6:45 the Board extended
executive session by 10 minutes.
OPEN SESSION: A motion was made at 6:55 pm by Nelson, seconded by Fewins, and carried by unanimous vote to
return to open session.
A motion was made by Elliot, seconded by Fewins, and carried by unanimous vote to add the consideration of continuation
of the football program to the agenda.
A motion was made by Meyer, seconded by Fewins, and carried by unanimous vote to discontinue FSCC’s football
program.
ADJOURNMENT: There being no further business to come before the Trustees, a motion to adjourn was made at 6:58
p.m. by Elliott, seconded by Hart, and carried by unanimous vote.
Chairman Clerk
6

Questions To The Trustees on Decision To Shut Down the FSCC Football Program

Matt Glades
Matt Glades, a Fort Scott Community College Alumni, encourages attendance for interested parties at the next board of trustees meeting, which is at 5 p.m. next Monday, December 13 at Cleaver-Burris-Boileau Hall.
He will be there to ask the trustees some questions about the discontinuance of the college’s football program last month.
“I have talked to at least one Greyhound football player from every decade going back to the 1960s and numerous community members,” Glades said. “There’s a lot of people sad and disappointed that the program is shut down and how it was done.”
“FSCC football has been around for almost 100 years and has impacted thousands of lives from the players to the community,” he said.  “A lot of us were confused and frustrated that we didn’t even have an opportunity to speak on behalf of the program or donate to save it.”
“The alumni are asking for more transparency on concerns from the FSCC administration and the board of trustees, Glades said.
“Here are a few but not all of those concerns, he said:
  • How does the college plan to account for losing that many student-athletes who were living in the dorms, credit hours, etc?

 

  • Do they understand that this also affects local businesses and severs connections for a lot of people ranging from parts of the community to the alumni including four current NFL football players?

 

  • Why were the FSCC football alumni and community never made aware of the financial struggles of the program and were not allowed the opportunity to save it?

 

  • Why did the board feel compelled to add shutting down the program to the tail end of the board meeting instead of putting it on the original agenda?”

FSCC New Housing: Garrison Hall

New FSCC student housing is located at 18th and Horton Streets, across from the campus.

The former Garrison Quarters apartments reno is completed after being purchased by Fort Scott Community College last spring.

 

FSCC purchased the complex for student housing and the building is renamed FSCC Garrison Hall.

 

“Each unit has two large bedrooms, one bathroom, kitchen, and living space,” Tom Harvon, FSCC Vice President of Student Affairs, said. “Each unit will house four students, for a total of 40 residents.

Tom Havron Submitted photos.

The apartments are a female-only complex, he said.

The reno added amenities.

“We have added on a laundry facility on the south end,” he said.  “Also, we have put new flooring, security system, and fire suppression system in the entire complex.”

The cost to students aligns with other student apartment living, Harvon said, which is $2,500 per semester.

“We are working with the city to get crosswalk markings across Horton for students to safely get to and from campus,” Havron said.

The college administration is being proactive for the school year.

“We have a waitlist at the start of every fall semester,” he said.  “It is difficult to turn students away, as many will then go somewhere else who can provide them housing and meals.  FSCC providing equitable housing options to students continues to be a priority.”

“We currently have students at (former) Mercy (Hospital building),” he said.  “We can’t predict the number of students who will be there this spring, at this time.  Hopefully, in the coming weeks, we will have a better idea of who will be completing their academics or transferring on to their four-year institution.”

Finals week at FSCC is Dec. 7-10.

The campus will open Jan. 5, 2022, classes start on Jan.  12, with spring graduation on May 14.

 

AD: FSCC Community Read Discussion Today, Dec. 1 at 2:30 p.m.

You are invited to the Campus & Community Common Read Discussion Event to be held on Wednesday, Dec. 1 at 2:30 p.m. in the Fort Scott Community College Library in Bailey Hall, 2108 S. Horton.

This event is brought to the students, staff, and local community of Fort Scott Community College by a Humanities Kansas grant which offered opportunities to discuss two books, A Choice of Weapons by Gordon Parks and The Other Wes Moore by Wes Moore.

Both are books related to culture and diversity.

The event is scheduled to be approximately 30-45 minutes long.
Description of event:
  • The FSCC Campus and Community Read is a semester-long book club that first read and discussed Gordon Parks’ A Choice of Weapons.  This reading ended with guest speakers during the Gordon Parks Celebration.  Topics discussed were culture and diversity topics faced by Gordon Parks.
  • The second book read and discussed was The Other Wes Moore by Wes Moore.  Dr. Jason Kegler spoke about culture and diversity related to the book as well as his experiences in southeast Kansas.

A wrap-up and discussions of future community read events will happen.

AD: FSCC Community Book Read Concludes Dec. 1 at 2:30 p.m.

You are invited to the Campus & Community Common Read Discussion Event to be held on Wednesday, Dec. 1 at 2:30 p.m. in the Fort Scott Community College Library in Bailey Hall, 2108 S. Horton.

This event is brought to the students, staff, and local community of Fort Scott Community College by a Humanities Kansas grant which offered opportunities to discuss two books, A Choice of Weapons by Gordon Parks and The Other Wes Moore by Wes Moore.

Both are books related to culture and diversity.

The event is scheduled to be approximately 30-45 minutes long.
Description of event:
  • The FSCC Campus and Community Read is a semester-long book club that first read and discussed Gordon Parks’ A Choice of Weapons.  This reading ended with guest speakers during the Gordon Parks Celebration.  Topics discussed were culture and diversity topics faced by Gordon Parks.
  • The second book read and discussed was The Other Wes Moore by Wes Moore.  Dr. Jason Kegler spoke about culture and diversity related to the book as well as his experiences in southeast Kansas.

A wrap-up and discussions of future community read events will happen.

Football Program Information by Alysia Johnston

Fort Scott Community College President Alysia Johnston.

The decision to terminate the legendary football program at Fort Scott Community College was made with the best interest of student-athletes, coaches, FSCC, and Bourbon county taxpayers.

Fort Scott Community College

It was a very difficult decision, as it is hard to place a dollar amount on the value our football athletes have provided to our college and community.

Many of our football students bring needed diversity and perspective to our campus and community.

Our football students have provided many hours of community service, as evidenced by the recent downtown clean-up.

Although many things have changed in the last several years regarding the football program, the opportunity we provided to young men who wanted to advance their college education by means of a football scholarship was not one of the changes.

Although the football program has provided invaluable opportunities for FSCC and football athletes, we had to evaluate the financial impact the program has on the college, as well as the sustainability of providing football students with the best opportunity to play on a competitive team.

Below is a summary of information that was critical in the decision made by the FSCC Board of Trustees, and supported by myself, to close the program.

  • At this time the cost vs revenue analysis of the football program indicates the football program is losing approximately $400,000 annually.
  • The Jayhawk conference changed the rules in 2017 from allowing D1 community colleges sports programs to provide student-athletes with books and tuition scholarships only – to allowing scholarships for books, tuition, fees, room, board, and $500 in school supplies. The previous cap on the number of out-of-state players for football was removed allowing for up to 85 out-of-state players certified. Two years ago the number of out-of-state football players was changed again and now 55 out-of-state players can be certified. There are no other options to compete in the Jayhawk Conference for football, baseball, golf and track other than D1. The conference also changed the rules for D2 sports scholarships in 2017 from books and tuition only – to books, tuition, and fees only. At FSCC we are designated D2 in women’s and men’s basketball, women’s volleyball, women’s softball.

  • Gender equity and equity for all athletes, regardless of the sport played, is required by the Federal Government. We must spend approximately the same dollar amount per student-athlete which is very difficult when D1 and D2 sports have different rules for scholarships.
  • The bottom line is, any additional dollars we would add to the football program in an attempt to make them more competitive, we must also add to all our sports programs to meet equity in athletics requirements.
  • The 2021 FSCC football roster had 16 Kansas players, 1 player from Bourbon County who quit the program in September. There are 19 community colleges in Kansas of which 8 have a football program. Each school can certify 85 football players for a total of 680 players (this does not include red-shirts or medical red-shirts). The 8 football programs had 163 Kansas players listed for the 2021 season. Local and Kansas students are not as numerous on football rosters as they were before the rule change.
  • In 2014/2015 the FSCC football program had a deficit of more than $400,000 in their foundation activities account. It was determined in 2015 for every student credit hour generated, $1 in student fees would be used to reimburse FSCC Endowment for the deficit. Student fees have refunded FSCC Endowment approximately $35,000 to $40,000 each year since then. We currently have approximately $186,000 left of the original $400,000 deficit.
  • The cruel, false, and inaccurate accusations that have been shared on many social media platforms, by mostly anonymous individuals and groups, regarding the football program has severely damaged our reputation and negatively affected our ability to move forward with the recruitment of student-athletes.
  • FSCC has fewer football coaches than any other school in the Jayhawk Conference. For example at the last FSCC game vs Independence Community College, we had 6 coaches on the sidelines and ICC had 14 (some of which are volunteers as they currently list 9 on their website). Butler has 11 football coaches listed, Coffeyville -8, Dodge – 7, Garden – 8, Highland – 12, Hutchinson – 10, Independence – 8, and FSCC – 6. Fewer coaches means fewer people recruiting students and fewer experts working with individual players on key skills. It also means we would need to spend more money and hire additional coaches to be at a similar level as the other programs in the Conference.

If the money we lose on the football program each year was the only consideration in determining whether to continue the football program at FSCC, we would not have made the tough decision to terminate the program. However, the current losses are only a part of the financial picture in determining the sustainability of a competitive football program at FSCC. When putting together the financial figures for the Board I looked at our current budget, revenue, expenses, and economic impact of the football program. Previous to hiring the current coaching staff I consulted with a past Jayhawk Conference football coach to see what he believed a minimum football budget would be to allow us to be competitive in the conference. He provided me with a detailed breakdown of what he believed we would need to spend based on his past coaching experience in the Jayhawk Conference, and it was more than twice our football budget at the time, which was $273,000. That did not include the fact if we increased the football budget, we would have to do the same for all of our other sports programs. Our FY 2021 unaudited football budget is $365,000, which does not include all football program expenses.

I believe when considering all the financial needs to fund a competitive football program it would take at least an additional one million annually, which would be an additional 10 mils the Bourbon County taxpayers would have to bear. The FSCC Board of Trustees, and myself as president, do not believe continuing the football program would uphold the fiduciary responsibility placed in us by taxpayers. We will continue to provide multiple opportunities for students allowing them to earn a scholarship to advance their educational goals by participating in activities and athletics that allow them to learn and have positive, transformational experiences while at FSCC.

Respectfully,

Alysia Johnston