Category Archives: Elections

Bourbon County Dems Meet Sept. 19

The Bourbon County Democratic Party will meet at 2 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 19, 2021, in the Heritage Room, Administration Bldg, Fort Scott Community College.
State Representative Jason Probst will be speaking.
Submitted by
Carol MacArthur, Chair, Bourbon Co. Democrats
Phone: 620 215 1505
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Constitutional Safeguard by Caryn Tyson

 

 

State Treasurer must be the constitutional safeguard when the governor refuses to follow rule of law.

Caryn Tyson, conservative candidate for State Treasurer announces she would not authorize payments demanded by the governor that do not comply with the rule of law.

“Whether it is federal funds or state funds, government funds come from the taxes paid by hard working Kansans. By breaking the rule of law, Governor Kelly is doing nothing short of forcing taxation without representation’” stated Tyson.

The following funds appear to have been spent in a manner that does not comply with state law:
1. During FY 2022, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment paid $4.0 million to the Boston Consulting Group in a no-bid contract for COVID-19 consulting services from the Immunization Grant Federal Fund. COVID-19 related spending from this fund has already exceeded the amount reviewed and approved by the Legislature by $1.5 million, only 6 weeks into the fiscal year. Spending amounts for COVID-19 from federal funds will substantially exceed the amount originally budgeted and specifically authorized by the Legislature. These expenditures must be recommended by the SPARK Executive Committee and approved by the SFC pursuant to 2021 Senate Bill No. 159
Section 63.
2. During FY 2021, subsequent to the 2021 Legislative Session, and in FY 2022, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment has paid $3.7 million for Public Service Announcements related to COVID-19 from the Disaster Grants and Public Assistance Federal Fund of KDHE. (FY 2021 $1.3 million; FY 2022 $2.3 million) No expenditures were budgeted by the Legislature for FY 2022 from this fund and expenditures should not have occurred without prior approval by the SPARK Executive Committee and the SFC for any COVID-19 related expenditure. While the source of the funding was Federal Emergency Management Authority, the purpose of the funds was COVID-19 response and this program and any expenditures must be recommended by the SPARK Executive Committee and approved by the SFC pursuant to 2021 Senate Bill No. 159 Section 63 prior to implementation and funding.
3. Pursuant to ARPA, the US Department of the Treasury provided $167.4 million from the federal Coronavirus Local Fiscal Recovery Fund to the Office of Governor for payment to local non- entitlement units (NEUs) of government to address the economic and health consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic. (NEUs are generally defined as local governments serving populations less than 50,000.) This money was not budgeted and specifically authorized by the Legislature during the 2021 Session for FY 2022. On June 17, 2021, the Office of Recovery hosted a webinar providing NEUs with initial instructions to request funds from the Office of Governor, to be submitted by July 26, 2021. As of August 11, 2021, an amount of $82.7 million was expended in FY 2022 as payment to NEUs without a recommendation from the SPARK Executive Committee.

“As state treasurer, I would not allow the Governor or anyone to spend taxpayer’s money that go against the rule of law,” said Caryn Tyson.

 

Caryn Tyson Launches Campaign For State Treasurer

Caryn Tyson

(Topeka) – As a leading conservative, Kansas Senator Caryn Tyson officially launched her campaign for State Treasurer with supporters from across the state at Ravenwood Lodge, Topeka. Tyson, who currently serves as Chairman of the Senate Assessment and Taxation Committee, told the audience, as State Treasurer she will lead the fight to keep government accountable.

“As a legislator, I work diligently to represent you and my record proves it.  Kansas needs a State Treasurer that will fight for your liberties by providing transparency and a watchdog on state spending and investments; We need a State Treasurer that will put Kansas First – that is exactly what I am going to do. From defending our Constitution, including the First and Second Amendment Rights, I don’t just talk the talk, I have and will continue to walk the walk.  I am the conservative leader who can deliver results as Kansas State Treasurer.  You can count on me to work for you,” stated Tyson.

Tyson works diligently for smaller, smarter government and to stop wasteful spending. Even before her time in the legislator her attention for detail and ability to get the job done in the field of Information Technology earned her awards for achievement and teamwork, including for her work on space shuttle support for NASA.

Representative Highland, inductee to the United States Army Officer Candidate School, said in supporting Tyson for State Treasurer, “I’ve worked with Caryn for going on 10 years.  I both respect and trust Caryn.  She never gives up.  She’ll fight.  One thing I like about Caryn is she respects the people she serves and she works for them, not for herself.”

“Caryn is actually trying to fight for you and put more money in your pocket.  And she truly believes in less government and I do too.  She’s one of those kind of people who doesn’t care who gets the pat on the back, just as long as the truck gets loaded and you save money.  She knows how to fight and true a conservative that will fight for you.” State Representative Ken Corbet.

Caryn Tyson has math and computer science degrees from Kansas State and a Master’s Degree in Engineering Management from KU. Caryn Tyson has a long career as a manager and lead in high level Information Technology, including financial systems. She is currently serving as a citizen legislator being elected for a third term in the Kansas Senate, after serving a term in the Kansas House.

Caryn and her husband, Tim – both fifth generation Kansans – own and operate Tyson Ranch in Linn County, established in 1871.

 

 

Local Democrats Meet July 18

The Bourbon County Democrats will hold a social meeting on Sunday, July 18th from 2-4 p.m. at Fort Scott Community College in the Administration Building’s Heritage Room.

Submitted by Carol MacArthur, Chair, Bourbon Co. Democrats
620 215 1505
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Republicans Meet: New County Attorney Selected Next Week

Chairman Mark McCoy speaks to the Bourbon County Republicans on June 24, at the Empress Event Center.

The Bourbon County Republicans met June 24 for their regularly scheduled meeting, but a meeting to select the new county attorney, was set up for next week.

Jacquie Spradling, who resigned recently as the county attorney, will be replaced on July 1, said Chairman Mark McCoy.

“We will be selecting a new county attorney on July 1 at 6 p.m. at the Empress (Event Center, 7 N. Main),” McCoy said. “We went over the rules for the upcoming meeting. There were a number of questions asked. I explained how we would operate.”

At the next meeting, there will be a time of public comment, he said. “Each person can have up to three minutes to speak for or against one of the candidates.”

After the public has an opportunity to speak, then the meeting will be a closed meeting for the party executive board and the committee people.

The candidates will have ten minutes to speak and the Bourbon County elected officials will also have time to speak for or against a candidate.

The only people involved in the decision of picking the candidate will be committeemen and women and party chairs, McCoy said.

Three candidates have applied so far, he said.

Jeffrey Williams, Baxter Springs; Steven Ellis, Spring Hill; and Tiana McElroy, Coffeyville are the three so far, with applications still being accepted until June 28, McCoy said.

Richard Hilderbrand, Kansas State Senator for the 13th District, gives a legislative update to the Bourbon County Republicans on June 24. Submitted photo by Vickie Shead.

Bourbon County Democrats Meet June 20

Bourbon County Democratic Party
meeting  will be at 2:00pm on Sunday, June 20th, 2021 at
Shirley Yeager Building on the
Bourbon County Fairgrounds
2102 Huntington Blvd. Fort Scott
The speaker  is Alana Cloutier, chairperson of Congressional District 2

Bourbon County Positions Up For Election 2021

Voters at  Bourbon County Clerk’s Office in a prior election…

Next Tuesday, June 1,  is the last day for candidates to file for the upcoming Bourbon County elections. The deadline is noon.

“We have the paperwork for anyone wanting to file,” Kendell Mason, Bourbon County Clerk said.

As of May 25, the following have filed to run:

For the Fort Scott City Commission – Matthew Wells and Michael Hoyt.

For the Bronson City Council – Clearsia Botts.

For Uniontown Mayor – Bill Marlow.

For Redfield Mayor – Wilma K. Graham.

For Redfield City Council – Kirby Martin and Michael Beerbower.

For Mapleton Mayor – Ronald B. Burton Jr.

For Mapleton City Council – Mike Blevins and Homer Wisdom.

For USD 234 Position #4 – David Stewart

For USD 235 Position #6 – Tyler J. Martin

For FSCC Board of Trustees- John Bartelsmeyer and Bill Meyer.

The following is information for the 2021 Bourbon County Election and the positions up for election supplied by the county clerk.

All the filing deadlines, for each entity,  is noon June 1st, 2021.

The filing location is the Bourbon County Clerk office, 210 S. National, Fort Scott.

The General Election will be on November 2, 2021.

In the city of Fort Scott, there are three city commission members, two of which are for four-year terms and one for two years. The filing fee is $20 or petition signed by not less than 25 qualified electors of Fort Scott and state filing fee of $50.

If more than 9 qualified candidates file there will be a Primary on August 3, 2021.

 

Up for election in Bronson is the mayor position and two council members, all four-year terms. There is a filing fee of $20 or a petition signed by no less than 10 qualified electors of Bronson for Bronson.

If more than 3 qualified candidates file for Mayor or more than 6 qualified candidates file for Council, then there will be a Primary on August 3, 2021.

 

Those positions up for election in Fulton are the mayor and five council members, all four-year terms.

The filing fee of $20 or a petition signed by no less than 5 qualified electors of Fulton.

If more than 3 qualified candidates file for mayor or more than 15 qualified candidates file for council then there will be a Primary on August 3, 2021.

 

For Uniontown and Redfield the positions of mayor and two council members are up for election, all four-year terms. There is a filing fee of $20 or a petition signed by no less than 20 (10%) of qualified electors of Uniontown for Uniontown.

A petition signed by no less than 10 qualified electors of Redfield for Redfield.

If more than 3 qualified candidates file for mayor or more than 6 qualified candidates file for council, then there will be a Primary on August 3, 2021.

 

For Mapleton, the mayor and two council members are up for election, all four-year terms.

There is a filing fee of $20 or a petition signed by no less than 2 qualified electors of Mapleton for Mapleton.

If more than 3 qualified candidates file for Mayor or more than 6 qualified candidates file for council, then there will be a Primary on

 

For the Southwind Extension District, there are 2 positions, both for four-year terms. There is a filing fee of $20.

 

For the Fort Scott School District, there are three positions, all for four-year terms.

The filing fee is $20 or a petition signed by no less than 50 qualified signatures of registered voters in the position for the USD #234 District.

If more than 3 qualified candidates file for any one position, then there will be a Primary on August 3, 2021.

 

For the Uniontown School District, there are three positions, all four-year terms.

There is a filing fee of $20 or a petition signed by no less than 50 qualified signatures of registered voters in the position for the USD #235 District.

If more than 3 qualified candidates file for any one position, then there will be a Primary on August 3, 2021.

 

For Fort Scott Community College there are three positions, all four-year terms. The filing fee is $20.

If more than 9 qualified candidates file there will be a Primary on August 3, 2021.

 

 

Any person wishing to file for any office must be a qualified elector of the corresponding city or school district.

If filing by petition, the petition must be turned in within 180 days after the first signature was collected, but no later than noon on June 1st, 2021.

Fort Scott City Commission Elections Jan. 2022

 

 

The terms of three members of the Fort Scott City Commission will expire in January 2022.  Individuals interested in becoming a candidate for the Fort Scott City Commission election are asked to contact the Bourbon County Clerk’s Office located in the Bourbon County Courthouse at 210 S. National in Fort Scott, Kansas, or by phone at 620-223-3800.  The deadline to file as a candidate is 12:00 Noon on Tuesday, June 1st, 2021.

Qualified candidates must be registered voters and residents of the City of Fort Scott at the time of the election.   The General Election will be held on Tuesday, November 2nd, 2021.  If more than nine (9) qualified candidates file, a Primary will be needed and it will be held on August 3rd, 2021.

Additional information may be obtained by contacting Diane Clay, City Clerk at 620-223-0550 or dclay@fscity.org.

Sales Tax Proposition On March 2 Ballot

Susan Bancroft. Submitted photo.

Fort Scott residents have the opportunity to vote on a proposed .5% sales tax for the City of Fort Scott on Tuesday, March 2.

 

The tax would go towards streets, parks, and community facilities improvements, which has been a call from the citizens of Fort Scott.

A history of the tax proposal

In 2010, Fort Scott residents passed a .5% sales tax for improvements to Buck Run Community Center and the Fort Scott Aquatic Center. This sales tax was for 10 years and set to expire June 30, 2021, according to a press release from Susan Bancroft, Fort Scott’s Finance Director.

 

“In December of 2020,  Fort Scott City Commission voted to petition for the continuation of the 0.5% sales tax for a different dedicated purpose for five years set to expire June 30, 2026,” she said.  “The city commission voted unanimously that 90% of the proposed .5% sales tax would go to streets and 10% to parks and community facilities. Based on the past five-year average, the .5% sales tax has the potential to raise on average $698,000 per year.”

 

“The .5% sales tax is not an additional tax, it is the renewal of a prior .5% sale tax,” Bancroft said. “The difference of proposing a sales tax versus a property tax for the community is that those visiting from other communities are contributing to the improvements of our local infrastructure.”

 

“The 90% dedicated to street improvements includes sidewalks, bike lanes, and curb and gutter work,” she said. “The street advisory board and the public works director have been working to develop a five-year plan of potential street improvements and have preliminary plans in place.”

 

“The 10% dedicated to parks and community facilities include improvements such as ADA compliance, public bathroom facilities, playground equipment, trails, and memorial hall preservation,” Bancroft said.

 

“The parks advisory board has also met with the public works director to begin a five-year plan of potential projects and reported to the city commission at their work session on February 23, 2021, priorities they feel need to be addressed,” she said.  “Year one they have proposed repairs to shelter houses and bathrooms in Gunn Park and repairs to the playground fall area at Nelson Park. Year two priority recommendations include an additional bathroom between shelter house 6 and 7 and further upgrades to the campground in Gunn Park.”

“During the election in November of 2020, the citizens passed a countywide 1% sales tax for Bourbon County,” Bancroft said. “The city commission committed to using 90% of the funds generated from this sales tax to be dedicated to the operations and maintenance of the street department. The remaining 10% would be used for the general purposes of the city. Collectively, the revenue generated from two sales tax initiatives would generate enough funding to put together a sustainable street program.”

 

 

 

Charter Ordinance 31: The No’s Have It

In the election question of shall charter ordinance No. 31 take effect, the no’s have it.

A CHARTER ORDINANCE EXEMPTING THE CITY OF FORT SCOTT, KANSAS FROM THE PROVISIONS OF K.S.A. 12-631p RELATING TO THE DISPOSITION OF SEWER AND STORM SEWER RESERVE FUNDS had 396 no votes to 139 yes votes.

 

See the Bourbon County Clerks report on the election here:

Jan 5, 2021 Special City Election Unofficial Results

To see a prior story on the ordinance:

FS Commission Discusses Charter Ordinance This Evening