Category Archives: COVID-19

USD 234 Will Close Schools January 13-14 Due to COVID-19 Virus

USD 234 Board of Education Building, 424 S. Main

The 1,860 Fort Scott school students will get five days off from school starting tomorrow, thanks to the pandemic.

USD 234 Superintendent Ted Hessong said because of the high student absenteeism and a high level of transmission of the virus, Fort Scott schools will be closed tomorrow Thursday, Jan. 13 and Friday, Jan. 14.

Ted Hessong. Submitted photo.

“These two days will count as snow days for tracking of hours on the academic calendar,” he said. “Remote Learning will not be utilized on these two days.”

The two days of school cancellation are followed by the weekend, then a  pre-scheduled staff professional development day on January 17.

“This closure is needed to assist in slowing down the spread of the virus and to give students and staff who are not feeling well time to recover.  We hope these five days away will help people,” he said.

“School activities will be canceled for January 13, 14 and 15,” he said.

“We will continue with the scheduled professional development day on Monday, January 17, and activities will resume on Monday,” Hessong said.

Masks will be required in all buildings on Tuesday when students return on the18th, he said.

“We will monitor numbers regarding the mask requirement next week,” Hessong said.

The Test to Stay and Learn virus testing program provided by the district and Community Health Center of Southeast Kansas will be available for students on Tuesday, he said.

Hessong provided the following graphic:

Student Absentee %  Tuesday, January 11 Wednesday, January 12
Fort Scott High School
143(absent)/573 = 25% 154(absent)/573 = 26.9%
Fort Scott Middle School
161(absent)/455 = 35.4% 150(absent)/455 = 33%
Eugene Ware Elementary 103(absent)/357 = 28.9% 106(absent/357 = 29.6%
Winfield Scott Elementary
82(absent)/385 = 21.3% 80(absent)/387 = 20.7%
Fort Scott Pre-School 10(absent)/90 = 11.1% 13(absent)/85 = 15.3%

 

CHC/SEK consolidates curbside COVID testing 

 

CHC/SEK will consolidate curbside testing for Coronavirus beginning Jan. 12. There will remain one curbside testing location in each county served by CHC/SEK.
Curbside COVID-19 testing will be temporarily suspended at Baxter Springs, Pittsburg South (1011 Mount Carmel Place), Arma, Fort Scott primary clinic, Independence, Mound City and La Cygne clinics.
CHC/SEK will shift resources and continue curbside testing by appointment at Pittsburg North (3011 N. Michigan), Pleasanton, Iola, Coffeyville, Parsons, Columbus, Miami and Fort Scott Walk-in Care. Some locations are scheduled out several days for testing appointments.
 “It is important to note that patients who are experiencing COVID symptoms are still be able to be seen by medical staff in all clinics and tested for Coronavirus as appropriate,” said Jason Wesco, President of the CHC/SEK health system.
The change comes after the health center experienced increasing demand for testing and staffing shortages caused by COVID-19, seasonal flu and other illnesses.
“Our staff have kept our communities safe through the pandemic, but we are experiencing levels of infection unlike we ever seen” he said. “To date, our staff have delivered almost 79,000 tests and almost 63,000 vaccinations. Staff are exhausted and this measure will help protect them while ensuring that we continue to test in every county we serve while continuing other critically needed healthcare services provided by CHC/SEK.”
If you receive word of a positive COVID-19 test, put on a mask immediately. Then isolate yourself as quickly as possible, even if you don’t have symptoms.
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends isolating for at least five full days, followed by five days of wearing a mask around others, as long as you don’t have a fever and any other symptoms are improving. If you are seriously ill with COVID-19 or have a weakened immune system, the CDC recommends an isolation period of 10 to 20 days.
If you have a fever, the agency advises you to stay home until the fever resolves. If you are waiting for test results but have symptoms of Covid-19, the CDC recommends that you isolate anyway, regardless of vaccination status.

CHC/SEK said its best advice is still to get vaccinated and get boosted. Wear a mask, don’t touch your eyes or face and wash your hands frequently. Social distance as possible and most of all, absolutely stay home if you think you might be ill or potentially exposed.

 

Quarantine Checklist For Travel

KDHE Amends Travel Related Quarantine List

The Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) has amended its travel quarantine list to add the states of New York and Washington D.C. and add the countries of Isle of Man and San Marino. An unvaccinated individual or those that have not received all the recommended vaccine doses, including boosters and additional primary shots, should quarantine if they meet the following criteria:

  • Traveled on or after Dec. 16 to Andorra.
  • Traveled on or after Jan. 10 to New York and Washington D.C.
  • Traveled on or after Jan. 10 to Isle of Man and San Marino.
  • Attendance at any out-of-state or in-state mass gatherings of 500 or more where individuals do not socially distance (6 feet) and wear a mask.
  • Been on a cruise ship or river cruise on or after March 15, 2020.

The length of a travel-related at home quarantine is 5 days after your last exposure with an additional requirement to wear a well-fitting mask indoors and outdoors when around others for an additional 5 days. If you cannot mask, at-home quarantine is recommended for 10 days. Quarantine would start the day after you return to Kansas or from the mass gathering. If you do not develop symptoms of COVID-19 during your quarantine period, then you are released from quarantine. Regularly check this list to stay up to date on travel-related guidance. Please refer to the KDHE Isolation and Quarantine FAQ for additional information.

For those traveling internationally, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is requiring testing within three days of flights into the U.S. For further information on this and other requirements, visit their website.

For those who meet the following criteria do not need to quarantine:

  • You are ages 18 or older and have received all recommended vaccine doses, including boosters and additional primary shots for some immunocompromised people.
  • You are ages 5-17 years and completed the primary series of COVID-19 vaccines.
  • You had confirmed COVID-19 within the last 90 days (you tested positive using a viral test).

Persons who do not meet the above criteria should continue to follow current quarantine guidance for travel or mass gatherings.

The travel quarantine list is determined using a formula to evaluate new cases over a two-week period, then adjusted for population size to provide a case rate per 100,000 population. This provides a number that can then be compared to the rate in Kansas. Locations with significantly higher rates — approximately 3x higher — are added to the list.

For more information on COVID-19, please visit the KDHE website at www.kdhe.ks.gov/coronavirus.

Fort Scott’s Middle School: Masks Required

USD 234 Board of Education Building, 424 S. Main
USD234 Superintendent Ted Hessong said in an email that as of Friday, January 7, the school district had 29 student active cases and nine staff cases.

 He gave the statistics of the number of COVID positive students and staff/total number of students and staff in a building as of Friday:

Fort Scott High School= 1.52%
Fort Scott Middle School= 2.26%
Eugene Ware Elementary School = 1.88%
Winfield Scott Elementary School= 1.30%
USD 234 Preschool = 2.00%
“According to the district’s gaiting criteria, any building that has a positivity rate over two percent and the community spread is over 30 new cases, that building will need to wear masks until the positivity rate falls below 2%,” Hesson said.  “Therefore, the middle school is required to wear masks at this time until the building positivity rate falls below 2%.  The preschool is not required to wear masks at this time because they have a lower student/staff population, but we are monitoring that building’s numbers.”
The school district has provided a way to follow  USD 234’s COVID Attendance Dashboard, he said, and this information is updated daily in the afternoon.
To view the state’s COVID-19 data:
Kansas has had 566,000 cases of the virus and 7,124 deaths. Bourbon County has had 3,192 cases and 44 deaths reported, according to https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b-1-d&q=latest+covid+stats+for+bourbon+county+ks
from the New York Times.

COVID-19 Update and Status on Kansas Hospitals.

COVID-19 Courtesy photo.
The COVID-19 Update for Kansas, per Kansas Department of Health and Environment:
There have been 15,332 new cases, 15 new deaths, and 104 new hospitalizations since Monday (1/3/22).
The average age of the COVID-19 case is 39.

Rebecca Johnston, Southeast Kansas Multi-Health Department Administrator, presented a  link to a Youtube video on a presentation about the dire state that Kansas Hospitals are in right now: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nz62gGguXhw

“I urge our residents to wear a mask in large gatherings, use good hygiene, practice social distancing, get vaccinated if able and stay home when sick!” she said.

The following is the updated Kansas guidelines:

2022 Updated COVID-19 Guidelines

For General Population + K-12 Schools

January 6, 2022

IF YOU TEST POSITIVE FOR COVID-19:

ISOLATE

EVERYONE, REGARDLESS OF VACCINATION STATUS:

  • Stay home for at least 5 days
  • Stay home as long as you have symptoms. If you have a fever, continue to stay home until your fever resolves.
  • If you have no symptoms or your symptoms resolve, you can leave your house after a minimum of 5 days of isolation.
  • Continue to wear a mask around others for 5 additional days after you leave isolation.

IF YOU HAVE BEEN EXPOSED TO COVID-19:

QUARANTINE PROCEDURES

IF YOU ARE VACCINATED:

IF YOU: Have been boosted

OR

Completed the primary series of Pfizer or Moderna vaccine within the last 6 months

OR

Completed the primary series of J&J vaccines within the last 2 months

OR

Have had lab-confirmed COVID-19 within the last 90 days

YOU SHOULD:

  • Wear a mask around others for 10 days
  • Test on day 5, if possible
  • If you develop symptoms at any time, get tested and stay home.

IF YOU ARE NOT FULLY VACCINATED:

IF YOU: Completed the primary series of Pfizer or Moderna vaccine more than 6 months ago and are not boosted

OR

Completed the primary series of J&J more than 2 months ago and are not boosted

OR

Are unvaccinated

YOU SHOULD:

  • Stay home for 5 days
  • Wear a mask around others for 10 days
  • Test on day 5, if possible
  • If you develop symptoms at any time, get tested and stay home
  • Household contacts may leave home quarantine on the positive case’s day 11 as long as:
  1. the positive case has worn a mask in the home while around the household contact during their isolation
  2. the household contact is not experiencing symptoms, are fever free and wear a mask around others for the remaining 5 days

*Please note: these guidelines are not for healthcare workers or congregate settings (correctional facilities, long-term care facilities, daycares).

COVID-19 Booster Shot and Additional Primary Dose for Immunocompromised Children

KDHE Expands Eligibility for COVID-19 Booster Shot and Additional Primary Dose for Immunocompromised Children

TOPEKA – The Kansas Department of Health and Environment has expanded eligibility for the COVID-19 vaccine booster shot and additional primary dose for immunocompromised children following authorization from the Food & Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). KDHE has authorized the 2,000+ COVID-19 vaccine providers across Kansas to begin administering the booster shot and additional primary dose to eligible populations.

“It has been proven that that the COVID-19 vaccine is effective and is the best tool to protect you and your loved ones from serious illness, hospitalization and death. Our hospitals continue to report that the large majority of patients hospitalized with COVID, particularly those on ventilators, are not vaccinated,” Janet Stanek, Acting Secretary, said. “Today’s announcement to expand eligibility opens up the COVID-19 vaccine booster shot to an additional 36,000 children who received their primary series at least 5 months ago. The Pfizer booster shot is shown to increase the neutralizing antibodies by 25-fold compared to just two doses. Now is the best time to get the booster shot or get the primary series if you have not gotten it to protect yourself and your family.”

The following updates were made to COVID-19 booster shot eligibility.

  • Children ages 12-15 are now eligible for a COVID-19 vaccine booster. Today, the CDC authorized the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 booster shot for children ages 12-15 to be administered 5 months after completing their Pfizer-BioNTech primary series. 36,474 of the 68,476 children who have completed the Pfizer-BioNTech primary series are now eligible to receive the vaccine booster.
  • Shortened booster waiting period. People can now receive a booster shot 5 months after completing the Pfizer-BioNTech primary series. This change comes following the January 4 announcement by the CDC. The waiting period for the Johnson & Johnson vaccine (2 months) or the Moderna vaccine (6 months) has not changed. The CDC has listed the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna as the preferred COVID-19 vaccine. Additionally, the CDC allows for mix and match dosing for booster shots.

The following update was made to the additional primary dose eligibility for immunocompromised people.

Moderately or severely immunocompromised children ages 5-11 can now receive an additional primary dose of COVID-19 vaccine administered 28 days after their second shot. This change comes following the January 4 announcement by the CDC.

Click here to find the COVID-19 vaccine eligibility information for primary, additional and booster vaccines.

KDHE continues to urge Kansans to use the following tools to protect against COVID-19 and the Omicron variant.

  • Get vaccinated and boosted. Vaccines remain the best tool to protect people from COVID-19, slow transmission and reduce the likelihood of new variants emerging. The authorized COVID-19 vaccines are highly effective in preventing serious illness, hospitalizations, and death. The COVID-19 vaccines approved or authorized in the United States are expected to protect against serious illness, hospitalizations, and death in people infected with the Omicron variant, especially for people who have received a booster. COVID-19 vaccines are now authorized for people ages 5 and over. Moderately or severely immunocompromised people ages 5 and over should receive an additional primary dose of vaccine 28 days after their second shot. The COVID-19 booster shots are authorized for all people ages 12 and over. To find a vaccine near you, visit Vaccines.gov.
  • Wear a mask. Masks offer protection against all variants. It is recommended that people in Kansas wear a well-fitting mask in public indoor settings, where COVID-19 transmission remains high, regardless of vaccination status.
  • Get tested. If you are sick or have been in close contact with someone diagnosed with COVID-19, it is recommended that you get tested for COVID-19. COVID-19 tests are available across Kansas. Go to KnowBeforeYouGoKS.com to find a free testing location near you.    At-home tests are available for purchase at grocery stores and pharmacies. If a positive result is received through an at-home test, people should follow up with a health care provider for a confirmation test.
  • Social distance. People should avoid large gatherings and stay at least 6 feet from others when in public settings, especially if you are at higher risk of getting sick.

Positive Events in Fort Scott: Mayor Jones

Fort Scott Mayor Josh Jones.

Fort Scott Mayor Josh Jones said many positive events happened in the community this past year, and the city is poised for some promising events in the new year.

“A lot of things done in 2021 laid the groundwork for 2022 and we expect a lot of 2021 things to be executed in 2022,” Jones said.

The following is what Jones provided fortscott.biz as accomplishments.

In 2021, the Fort Scott City Commission:

1. Refinanced city bonds saving $15,500 per year over the next five years.
2. Passed a half-cent sales tax with 90% of revenue going towards streets and 10% going towards parks. This money will start coming in, in 2022.
3. Started an in-house safety training program saving the city $15,000 per year.
4. Utilized the Firstsource Building for  Southeast Kansas Multi-County Health Department’s giving mass vaccines during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic.
5. Put out Requests for Qualifications for a new city attorney leading to the city commission hiring a city attorney saving the city approximately $200,000 a year.
6. Approved to enter into a cost-sharing venture with the Bourbon County Commission for joint purchase of materials and equipment.
7. Approved a conditional use permit for an area south of town to allow a micro-meat processing plant to build a facility,  which will create about 30 jobs.
8. Implemented the SeeClickFix app, which allows citizens to report road problems and code nuisances.
9. Started semi-monthly roller skating sessions at Buck Run Community Center for an added amenity for the community.
10. Moved city-county emergency dispatch to the Bourbon County Courthouse.
11. Improved the beach area at Lake Fort Scott.
12. Sold the Firstsource Building for $315,000.
13. Sold four Lake Fort Scott lots for approximately $500,000.
14. Entered into a shared services agreement with Bourbon County for information technology services, saving approximately $30,000 per year.
15. Used $200,000 of American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) funds for a feasibility study for re-use of the former Mercy Hospital Building as a hospital.
16. Reworked and finalized setting up the Fort Scott Land Bank which focuses on the conversion of vacant, abandoned, tax-delinquent, or otherwise underused properties into productive use.
17. Approved $2,000 bonuses for all emergency services workers that work for the city.
18. Entered into an agreement with Bourbon County REDI (Regional Economic Development, Inc.) to provide economic development services for the City of Fort Scott,  saving approximately $100,000 a year.
19. Repaired over one mile of city sewer lines.
20. Entered into an agreement with the Kansas Department of Transportation for traffic signal upgrades in 2022 on Highway 69.
21. Was awarded a $50,000 grant from T-Mobile Internet for upgrades to the Skubitz Plaza area on the north end of historic downtown Fort Scott.

 

Bourbon County Commission Highlights For 2021

Lynne Oharah is the current chairman of the Bourbon County Commission. Submitted photo.

Bourbon County District 1 Commissioner Lynne Oharah is optimistic for the future.

“I am seeing major endeavors in economic development, improved infrastructure, and continued cost savings to the taxpayers,” Oharah said in response to questions from fortscott.biz.

“One of the major accomplishments that was achieved in 2021 is the mill levy was reduced by 1.68 mills for the 2021 budget year and 2.43 for the 2022 budget year which is a total reduction of 4.11 mills or approximately $440,000 taxpayer dollars, which is a trend that the commission is dedicated to continuing.”

A significant success this year was the asphalt program for roads.

“Our Public Works Director and his crews were able to lay 14 miles or 28 lane miles of asphalt at the depth of 2 and ½ inches which has never been accomplished in at least the last seven years,” he said. “If this trend continues through a vigorous chip and seal program coupled with increased asphalt application we are in a position to improve all of our asphalt roads.”

Additionally, the public works crews are increasing gravel production which will mean more gravel on county roads, he said.

“Although COVID-19 hit our community hard this year, the residents continued to support our local economy, “Oharah said. “Sales tax receipts were up this year, allowing us to do more projects in the road and bridge department on hard surface roads.”

“2021 saw the reorganization of BEDCO (Bourbon County Economic Development Council, Inc.) into a county-wide economic development board which was able to consolidate economic development for the county and cities, as a whole,” he said.

It is now called Bourbon County REDI  (Regional Economic Development Inc.)  and a new economic development director was hired, Rob Harrington.

“One of Rob’s first tasks was to provide a roadmap to a successful economic development program,” he said.

“Just to name one of these successes is the introduction of a  $125,000 granting program that awarded grants to the smaller communities to improve quality of life in these communities, plus a bike recreation project in Gunn Park,” he said.

Harrington, along with other individuals, is working to increase access to healthcare, which is one of the keys to the growth of Bourbon County, he said.

Oharah said the results of the hospital feasibility study will be released on January 31.

For the Bourbon County Courthouse, there have been many personnel changes.

The commission has hired Susan Bancroft as the financial/human resource director, which has been needed for many years, he said.

This position has resulted in an ability to provide the financial tracking and oversite, budget planning, program implementation, and human resource services that have been lacking, he said.

Additionally, Bancroft is working part-time for the City of Fort Scott until they can find a replacement finance director.

A new county appraiser was hired, Matt Quick.

“Matt is very good at what he does and very good at public relations,” he said.

The commissioners also hired a new county clerk,  Ashley Shelton. “Ashley has hit the road running, is personable, and a fast learner,” he said.

The county’s information technology department has been busy, as the City of Fort Scott and the county signed a contract to share the services and their costs, he said.

“The IT department worked with the 911 dispatch center to move dispatch into the old jail area at the courthouse which increases safety for this essential group,” Oharah said.  “IT is continuing to work on providing broadband access to areas of Bourbon County that are poorly served.”

“Lastly, I’m sure that you have noticed that the front steps at the courthouse have been replaced,” he said.

A few anticipated Bourbon County Commission 2022 projects:

  • Start repairs on the Elm Creek Lake dam.
  • Move all budget responsibilities under directors and elected officials.
  • Move to electronic time reporting.
  • Implement public works to handle public works projects and work orders.

“As we wrap up 2021, I want to wish our residents a happy new year and I look forward to a more prosperous year in 2022,” he said.

 

 

KDHE Updates Isolation and Quarantine Guidance  

TOPEKA – The Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) has updated the isolation and quarantine guidance following the recent changes by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for health care workers in a hospital setting and the general population. CDC is in the process of updating guidance for other settings such as correctional facilities, long-term care facilities, preschool, K-12 schools and institutions of higher education.

Health Care Workers in a Hospital Setting

  • Health care workers with lab confirmed COVID-19 infections should isolate for 10 days OR 7 days with negative test, if asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic (with improving symptoms).
  • Health care workers with COVID-19 who are asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic can return to work only with COVID-19 positive patients during the remainder of the 10-day infectious period.
  • Boosted and asymptomatic health care workers who are close contacts of a person with confirmed COVID-19 infection have no work restrictions with negative test on days 2 and 5-7.
  • Not boosted and unvaccinated asymptomatic health care workers who are close contacts of a person with confirmed COVID-19 infection must quarantine for 10 days OR 7 days with a negative test.

General Population 

The general population does not include people who work in a health care setting or other congregate setting. If individuals develop symptoms, they should get a test and stay home.

  • People with lab confirmed COVID-19 infections, regardless of vaccination status should stay home for 5 days. If you have no symptoms or your symptoms are resolving after 5 days and you are fever-free for 24 hours without the use of fever reducing medications, you can leave your house. Individuals should continue to wear a mask around others for 5 additional days.
  • Boosted or fully vaccinated individuals with Pfizer/Moderna within last 6 months or Johnson & Johnson within last 2 months who are close contacts of a person with confirmed COVID-19 infection do NOT have to stay home and should wear a mask around others for 10 days. If possible, individuals should get tested on day 5.
  • People who are unvaccinated OR have completed the primary series of Pfizer/Moderna vaccine over 6 months ago and are not boosted OR completed the primary series of Johnson & Johnson over 2 months ago and are not boosted who are close contacts of a person with confirmed COVID-19 infection should stay home for 5 days. After that continue to wear a mask around others for 5 additional days. If unable to quarantine, individuals must wear a mask for 10 days. If possible, individuals should get tested on day 5.

HAVE YOU TESTED POSITIVE OR BEEN EXPOSED TO COVID-19?

If you’ve recently tested positive for COVID-19 and have questions regarding isolation, please call:

(785)542-6625, then dial 0 for assistance.

If you have been exposed to someone with COVID-19 (close contact) and have questions about quarantine, please call:

(866)534-3463 and follow prompts. For contact tracing, dial 3.

Flags at Half-Staff for 7001 Kansans Lost to COVID-19

Governor Laura Kelly Directs Flags be Flown at Half-staff to Honor 7,001 Kansans Who Lost Their Lives to COVID-19

TOPEKA – In honor of the more than 7,000 lives lost due to COVID-19, and the families they left behind, Governor Laura Kelly today directed flags be lowered to half-staff throughout the state effective immediately to sundown Friday, December  31, 2021.

“It is with great sadness that I am ordering flags to half-staff for the seventh time since the pandemic began,” Governor Kelly said. “We have the tools to stop this virus and prevent further unnecessary deaths of our loved ones. Whether you are considering your first shot, or your third, I urge all Kansans to get vaccinated as soon as possible.”

To find a vaccine near you, visit vaccines.gov.

To receive email alerts when the governor orders flags to half-staff, please visit: https://governor.kansas.gov/newsroom/kansas-flag-honor.

KDHE Amends Travel & Exposure Related Quarantine List

 

TOPEKA – The Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) has amended its travel quarantine list to remove the countries of Austria, Belgium, Cayman Islands, Czechia, Gibraltar, Jersey, Liechtenstein, Netherlands, Slovakia and Slovenia. The country of Andorra has been added to the travel quarantine list. An unvaccinated individual should quarantine if they meet the following criteria:

  • Traveled between Nov. 4 and Dec. 17 to Slovenia.
  • Traveled between Nov. 18 and Dec. 17 to Austria, Cayman Islands and Gibraltar.
  • Traveled between Dec. 2 and Dec. 17 to Belgium, Czechia, Jersey, Liechtenstein, Netherlands and Slovakia.
  • Traveled on or after Dec. 17 to Andorra.
  • Attendance at any out-of-state or in-state mass gatherings of 500 or more where individuals do not socially distance (6 feet) and wear a mask.
  • Been on a cruise ship or river cruise on or after March 15, 2020.

The next travel quarantine list update will be sent out during the first week of January.

The travel and mass gathering quarantine period is seven days with a negative test result or 10 days without testing, with release from quarantine on Day 8 and Day 11, respectively. Further information on quarantine periods can be found on KDHE’s website.

For those traveling internationally, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is requiring testing within three days of flights into the U.S. For further information on this and other requirements, visit their website.

For those who are fully vaccinated (meaning it has been greater than two weeks since they completed their vaccinations) they are not required to quarantine regarding travel or mass gatherings if they meet all of the following criteria:

  • Are fully vaccinated (i.e., ≥2 weeks following receipt of the second dose in a 2- dose series, or ≥2 weeks following receipt of one dose of a single-dose vaccine).
  • Have remained asymptomatic since the travel.

Persons who do not meet the above criteria should continue to follow current quarantine guidance for travel or mass gatherings.

Additionally, people with previous COVID-19 disease are not required to quarantine following travel if they meet all of the following criteria:

  • Have evidence of a previous infection supported by a positive PCR or antigen test
  • Are within 6 months following infection. If an investigation was done documenting the date that symptoms resolved, or the date isolation measures were discontinued for asymptomatic patients, then the 6-month period can start from that end date. If those dates are not available, then the period will start from the date of the positive laboratory test. A serology or antibody test may not be substituted for a laboratory report of a viral diagnostic test.
  • Have remained asymptomatic since the travel

Persons who do not meet all three of the above criteria should continue to follow current quarantine guidance for travel.

The travel quarantine list is determined using a formula to evaluate new cases over a two-week period, then adjusted for population size to provide a case rate per 100,000 population. This provides a number that can then be compared to the rate in Kansas. Locations with significantly higher rates — approximately 3x higher — are added to the list.

For more information on COVID-19, please visit the KDHE website at kdhe.ks.gov/coronavirus.