City Tree/Brush Dump Site Open All Week

The City’s tree and brush dump site will be open from 8:00 a.m. till 5:00 p.m. Monday, July 23rd through Friday, July 27th, 2018 from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Saturday hours will return to normal hours which are 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. and normal hours will resume the following week. Residents are encouraged to take their tree damage from the recent storm to the brush dump.

City Design Review Board To Discuss 9 N. Main

The Design Review Board will meet on Thursday, July 26th, 2018 at 4:00 p.m. at the City Hall Commission Meeting room at 123 S. Main Street, Fort Scott, Kansas. This meeting will be held to discuss a Certificate of Appropriateness for improvements to the building at 9 N. Main and any other matters that may come before the Board. This meeting is open to the public.

Wine, Art and Concert July 27 In Downtown Fort Scott

Stroll the Historic Downtown Main Street, enjoy some art and country music this Friday.

Hit the Bricks Wine Stroll,

Art Walk and Blane Howard Concert

 Historic downtown Fort Scott will be bustling the night of Friday, July 27, with the crowd at the second Hit the Bricks Wine Stroll, Art Walk and Blane Howard concert. Main Street will be closed at 3:30 p.m. to foot traffic only between 1st and 2nd Streets so participants can safely enjoy the event.

The evening kicks off at 5 p.m. and features a variety of events to appeal to a broad audience and all ages. The art walk, coordinated by the BCAC, is free and open to the public. Everyone is welcome to enjoy the works displayed by area artists and the sounds of local musicians.

For participants age 21 years and older, the wine stroll will feature 1.5-ounce samplings of wines from several Kansas wineries and vineyards. Cost for the wine stroll is $25 and includes a commemorative wine glass and logoed reusable wine bag for purchases. A valid ID is required at check-in located outside of 119 S Main. Only paid participants with a valid wristband are allowed to sample alcohol.

New to the stroll this year are two distilleries, TJ’s Brew & Microdistillery and Ornery Brothers Distilling, plus Fossil Springs Winery and Get Drizzled, a wine drizzle used for food toppings. Returning for the second year are Aubrey Vineyards, Flustered Blonde Vineyards, Smoky Hill Vineyards and Vogel Family Vineyards. Wine vendors will have unopened bottles of wine for sale. According to Kansas Alcoholic Beverage Control regulations, distilleries may only offer product samples. Patrons may purchase food from Sam and Louie’s Food Truck.

Topping off the night, country music sensation Blane Howard will have folks dancing at Liberty Theatre beginning at 8:30 p.m. Howard recently signed a big recording contract so this is a wonderful opportunity to enjoy him perform locally. Tickets for the Blane Howard concert are $35 each.

Patrons can save $10 if they purchase both the wine stroll and concert tickets for $50. Tickets are available online at mercy.net/stroll.

The Mercy Health Foundation Board is excited to host this event once again as an opportunity for people to enjoy the history and revitalization of our lovely Main Street,” said Tina Rockhold, Mercy Health Foundation executive director. “We are grateful for the collaboration with the City of Fort Scott, the Bourbon County Arts Council (BCAC), Modern Woodmen Fraternal Financial, Union State Bank, the local liquor stores, and APS Staffing to make the event possible.”

All proceeds from the Hit the Bricks event will help Mercy Health Foundation Fort Scott, a nonprofit 501(C)3 corporation, purchase a new transport ambulance. Cost for the ambulance is $80,000.

To learn more about the Mercy Health Foundation or make a donation visit https://www.mercy.net/practice/mercy-health-foundation-fort-scott/ or call 620-223-8094.

Master Gardener Training Offered This Fall

Krista Harding is a K-State Research and Extension Agricultural agent assigned to Southwind District. She may be reached at kharding@ksu.edu or 620-244-3826.

Area plant lovers will have a great opportunity this fall to participate in an outstanding horticulture program!

The Master Gardener training will be held in Chanute starting September 10th and will conclude on October 15th. The training is held during the day from 9 am to 4 pm. The Master Gardener program is a volunteer program in which K-State Research and Extension “trades” classroom training for volunteer time.

Master Gardener training consists of 40 to 50 hours of instruction in all aspects of horticulture.

Instructors include state specialists from Kansas State University, local extension agents and local experts. After training is completed, volunteers donate an equivalent number of hours of service as was received in instruction.

Topics that will be covered in the training include:

  • Plant Growth & Development
  • Soils, Water and Fertilizer
  • Vegetable Gardening
  • Insect Diagnosis & Management
  • Fruit Gardening
  • Annuals & Perennials
  • Woody and Grassy Ornamentals
  • Turfgrass
  • Landscape Maintenance
  • Plant Disease Diagnosis & Management
  • Pesticide Use and Safety

Although the Master Gardener program is a volunteer activity, there are some requirements that must be met prior to the selection process. Each individual wishing to participate in the Master Gardener training must meet the following requirements:

  • You need to be available for about 40 hours of community horticulture service during the first year. The number of hours to be donated is equal to the number of hours of training received.
  • You must have at least a High School Diploma or the equivalent.
  • You must be willing to travel to the training site for all classes.
  • Enjoy sharing your love of gardening with others through various Extension Master Gardener projects.

The Southwind Extension District currently has an active Master Gardener program consisting of 25 individuals. The Master Gardeners have completed volunteer projects such as demonstration flower beds, vegetable research trials and various other projects in Erie, Chanute, Iola, Humboldt, Moran and Fort Scott. In addition, educational tours and activities are also planned.

Applications are available now and are due to the Southwind Extension District by August 27th. Applications can be picked up at any of our four Extension office locations, e-mailed or mailed to you. The fee for the course is $85 which covers the cost of the Master Gardener resource notebook. For more information about the Master Gardener training, please contact the Extension office.

Krista Harding is a K-State Research and Extension Agricultural agent assigned to Southwind District. She may be reached at kharding@ksu.edu or 620-244-3826.

K-State Research and Extension is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

What’s Happening In Fort Scott By the Chamber of Commerce

 

20-21
Livestock Sale – Fort Scott Livestock Market, 2131 Maple Rd., 10am-5pm
20-21
50-min. narrated Trolley Tours of Historic Fort Scott on the hour from 11am-4pm leaving from the Convention & Visitors Bureau at 231 E. Wall St., $6 adults, $4 children 12 and under, last tour leaves at 3pm.

20-21
Showing of “Snew White” at the Fort Scott High School Auditorium hosted by the Tiger Drama Camp

20-21
Free Dump Day – Fort Scott/Bourbon County, Bourbon Co. Transfer Station Landfill, 2257 Noble Rd., Fri. 8am-4pm, Sat. 8am-12pm
20
Friday Night Concert in the Park – Heritage Pavilion, 1st & Main St., downtown, 7-8pm, will be at Common Ground Coffee Co. if excessive heat.
20
Junior Livestock Sale – Bourbon Co. Fairgrounds, 7pm
20 Ben Grace & Paul Demer at your local Microbrewery – The Boiler Room Brewhaus, 2 S. National Ave.,
7:30-9:30pm

You may buy your tickets for $10 at the Chamber or $15 at the door of The Boiler Room Brewhaus at the time of the show.

20 Star Wars Outdoor Movie Night – downtown city park just S. of the Lowell Milken Center, Wall & Main St., 8:30pm
21
KS Rocks Recreation Park Crawling for Down Syndrom Benefit Run

21
6th Annual Tiger Baseball Golf Tournament – Woodland Hills Golf Tournament, 2414 Horton St., 8am-2pm

All proceeds go to the benefits of the FSHS Tiger Baseball Program. Call Josh Regan at 620-288-6617 for more information or to registar a team/sponsorship.
21
Farmers’ Market – Skubitz Plaza, downtown, 8am-12pm
21
Family Day – Fort Scott National Historic Site, 10am-12pm, 12:30-2pm

This is fun for the whole family with activities in the morning and afternoon

21
Gordon Parks Museum Cinema Saturdays – Leadbelly, Gordon Parks Museum, 2108 S. Horton St., 1-2:45pm
21
Missouri State Tractor Pullers Association – Bourbon Co. Fairgrounds, 7pm

Contact Mark Crystal at 620-224-9388 for more information.

24
Summer Reading: Libraries Rock! – FS Public Library, 201 S. National Ave.,
10-11am
24 Kiwanis Meeting – FSCC Heritage Room, 2108 Horton St., 12-1pm
24
T.O.P.S. Meeting Held – Buck Run Community Center, 735 Scott Ave.,
4-5pm
24
Farmers’ Market – Skubitz Plaza, downtown, 4-6pm
25
Breakfast Bingo – Buck Run Community College, 735 Scott Ave., 9-10am
25
Summer Reading: Libraries Rock! – FS Public Library, 201 S. National Ave.,
10-11am
25
Rotary Meeting – Presbyterian Church, 308 S. Crawford, 12-1pm
25 Adult Coloring Program – FS Public Library, 201 S. National Ave., 2-4pm
25 TAG – Teen Advisory Group, FS
Public Library, 201 S. National Ave.,
4-5pm
26
Chamber Coffee – Skitch’s Inc., 8am
26
Kiwanis Meeting – FSCC Heritage Room, 2108 Horton St., 12-1pm
26
Thursday Card Players – Buck Run Community Center, 735 Scott Ave.,
6-9pm
27-29
Lowell Milken Center for Unsung Heros – Poland 2017 Trip Reunion, 1 S. Main St.
27-29 The Polish Life in a Jar Reunion – Lowell Milken Center, 1 S. Main St., The events are three days for the 32 and families who traveled to Poland in the summer of2017. They are from all over the county and Poland.
27-28
Livestock Sale – Fort Scott Livestock Market, 2131 Maple Rd., 10am-5pm
27-28
50-min. narrated Trolley Tours of Historic Fort Scott on the hour from 11am-4pm leaving from the Convention & Visitors Bureau at 231 E. Wall St., $6 adults, $4 children 12 and under, last tour leaves at 3pm.
27
Chamber Golf Classic – Woodland Hills Golf Course, 2414 Horton St., registration begins at 11am and tee-off at 12pm
To register or to look into more information about the event click here
27 Gordon Parks Museum presents: Wine & Design: Create a Masterpiece – Participiants will experience creating a one-of-a-kind piece of artwork using photography, pastels, and/or watercolors. The finished work will be printed on 11 by 17 paper and be suitable for framing, $25 fee, 2108 S. Horton, 1-4pm
27
Mercy Health Foundation Fort Scott Wine Stroll, Art Walk, and Concert – Wine Stroll & Art Walk from 5-8pm and Blane Howard country music at Liberty Theatre from 8:30-11:30pm, registration at 2nd & Main St.
$25 for Wine Stroll and you must be 21 years or older
$30 for Blane Howard concert and if you purchase both you will save $10
27
Friday Night Concert in the Park – Heritage Pavilion, 1st & Main St., downtown, 7-8pm, will be at Common Ground Coffee Co. if excessive heat.
28
Come visit the art show at Fort Scott National Historic Show! This is fun for the whole family and kids K-12 grade may put their best creations in the art show. First and second place winners will recieve a prize. The creations must be brought to the fort by July 26th at 5pm.
28 KS Rocks Recreation Park Summer
Off-Road 101 Course
28 Farmers’ Market – Skubitz Plaza, downtown, 8am-12pm
28 Lowell Milken Center for Unsung Heros – Life in a Jar author Jack Mayer, Liberty Theatre, 113 S. Main St., 10am
28
Dr. Roger Parris Retirement Reception – Mercy Hospital in the Catherine’s Cafe, 10am-2pm
28 Gordon Parks Museum Cinema Saturdays – The Learning Tree, Gordon Parks Museum, 2108 S. Horton St., 1-2:45pm
28 Lowell Milkens Center for Unsung Heros – Life in a Jar Performance, Liberty Theatre, 113 S. Main St., 2pm
31
Summer Reading: Libraries Rock! – FS Public Library, 201 S. National Ave.,
10-11am
31 Kiwanis Meeting – FSCC Heritage Room, 2108 Horton St., 12-1pm
31
T.O.P.S. Meeting Held – Buck Run Community Center, 735 Scott Ave.,
4-5pm
31 Farmers’ Market – Skubitz Plaza, downtown, 4-6pm
31
Harry Potter Birthday Party for Teens – Fort Scott Public Library, 201 S. National Ave., 4-6pm

This event is for middle and high schoolers only, based on their grade this fall. To qualify for the party, you must have attended at least one prior program and been registered for summer reading.

31
Election Candidate Forum – FSHS, 1005 S. Main St., doors open at 5:30, forum at 6-8pm

The Process of Cleaning Water

Jason McReynolds releases water from a hydrant on 2nd Street Wednesday, which is part of the process of cleaning the water system. The flushing gets the chlorine into the system faster and farther, Scott Flater said.

The Marmaton River is the source of drinking water for almost all of Bourbon County, except for the most extreme western portion, which has a private reservoir.

Scott Flater is the superintendent of the City of Fort Scott Water Production Department, who is tasked with providing clean, safe water from the Marmaton River to all of Fort Scott and Consolidated Rural Water District # 2 residents.

“We make water for the city,” Flater said. “But our number one customer is Rural Water #2.”

Over two million gallons of water a day is processed and sent out to the city and the county, he said.

“Everything comes through this building,” Flater said. “We have a river intake on 5th and Short Streets.”

The rural water district then sells and distributes the water from Fort Scott to the small towns in Bourbon County.

The city’s water production employees are in the middle of a cleanout process.  It’s called burn out/flushing, and it’s an annual event.

“The water is safe during the rest of the year or during this burnout (cleaning out), it’s safe,” Flater said. “We are sending it out to our family and our community. It’s the highest quality.”

The cleaning out of the system is a maintenance practice for the distribution system, Flater said.

They started July 16, and if all goes as planned the water cleaning process should be completed by the end of next week, Flater said.

“The burnout won’t reach outside of Fort Scott until today (July 20),” Flater said.

Flater commended a small town in Bourbon County for being far-thinking in their water supply.

Flater said Uniontown, in the western part of the county, has been “pro-active to rebuild their water infrastructure” in the last few years. “They’ve done a great job.”

This computer screen is set up in the office of the water treatment plant at Ninth and Burke streets and shows the outline of the water cleaning process, so the plant operators can see what is going on in the plant.
Scott Flater shows the water samples that are tested: from left is water directly from the river, the middle is water that has been mixed with chemicals and the right is the water that has been fully processed and is ready to drink. This is so plant operators can do “right now” testing on the water, he said.
Brandon Russell, one of four plant operators, does comparative water testing in the water treatment plant Thursday.
The turquoise and blue pipe in the center of the photo is located in the lower level of the city’s water plant. The 24-inch pipe is where all the Marmaton River water is piped into the plant. It is then processed in a mixer with chemicals. The water is then transported to a settling basin. Following this step, chlorine is added to the water. It is then run through a filter and goes into a clear well from where the water proceeds to water towers then to the water distribution system.

Trees in Roadway, Power Lines Down as Result of Storm

Workers clear away a tree from a yard at 12th St. and National Avenue Friday morning, following a storm Thursday evening.

Bourbon County wide the Fort Scott Police Department had approximately 25 calls for service that were storm related, according to Cpt. Shaun T. West, Fort Scott Police Department.

Most of the calls were for trees in the roadway, power lines down or alarms due to power issues, he said.

“We did have one non injury vehicle accident in the county which may have been weather related, but I don’t enough information on it as it was worked by Kansas Highway Patrol,” West said.

“There was one accident reported,” Sheriff Bill Martin said. ” That occurred on south 69 Highway at Birch Road. The Kansas Highway Patrol worked that.”

Martin noted there were power outages in the Uniontown area.

The majority of Bourbon County was never issued a severe thunderstorm warning,  William Wallis,  Bourbon County Emergency Management Director, said.

“This was due to the fact that we didn’t meet one or both of the required criteria that enables the National Weather service to issue a Severe Thunderstorm Warning,” Wallis said. ” When the National Weather Service issues a warning it is sent to CodeRed who then issues a warning to the exact location within our county, per the address that the individual signs up with. That is the reason why no one received a CodeRed especially in the Fort Scott area.”

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Parris Reception July 28

The public is invited to a retirement reception for David Parris, M.D., from 10 a.m. to noon on Saturday, July 28, in the Mercy Hospital cafeteria.

Dr. Parris earned this medical degree from University of Missouri – Columbia and completed his family medicine residency at Wesley Medical Center in Wichita. He specializes in family medicine and emergency medicine. Dr. Parris is board certified by the American Board of Family Medicine.

In May, Dr. Parris was awarded the coveted 5-Star Award by ranking in PRC’s top 10 percent nationally for “excellent” responses in patient satisfaction surveys. He is also a fabulous vocalist and has performed in many musicals.

Mercy, named one of the top five large U.S. health systems in 2018, 2017 and 2016 by IBM Watson Health, serves millions annually. Mercy includes more than 40 acute care and specialty (heart, children’s, orthopedic and rehab) hospitals, 800 physician practices and outpatient facilities, 44,000 co-workers and 2,100 Mercy Clinic physicians in Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri and Oklahoma. Mercy also has clinics, outpatient services and outreach ministries in Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas. In addition, Mercy’s IT division, Mercy Technology Services, supply chain organization, ROi, and Mercy Virtual commercially serve providers and patients in more than 20 states coast to coast.
supply chain organization, ROi, and Mercy Virtual commercially serve providers and patients in more than 20 states coast to coast.
The public is invited to a retirement reception for David Parris, M.D., from 10 a.m. to noon on Saturday, July 28, in the Mercy Hospital cafeteria.

Dr. Parris earned this medical degree from University of Missouri – Columbia and completed his family medicine residency at Wesley Medical Center in Wichita. He specializes in family medicine and emergency medicine. Dr. Parris is board certified by the American Board of Family Medicine.

In May, Dr. Parris was awarded the coveted 5-Star Award by ranking in PRC’s top 10 percent nationally for “excellent” responses in patient satisfaction surveys. He is also a fabulous vocalist and has performed in many musicals.

Mercy, named one of the top five large U.S. health systems in 2018, 2017 and 2016 by IBM Watson Health, serves millions annually. Mercy includes more than 40 acute care and specialty (heart, children’s, orthopedic and rehab) hospitals, 800 physician practices and outpatient facilities, 44,000 co-workers and 2,100 Mercy Clinic physicians in Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri and Oklahoma. Mercy also has clinics, outpatient services and outreach ministries in Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas. In addition, Mercy’s IT division, Mercy Technology Services, supply chain organization, ROi, and Mercy Virtual commercially serve providers and patients in more than 20 states coast to coast.
supply chain organization, ROi, and Mercy Virtual commercially serve providers and patients in more than 20 states coast to coast.

FS Community Foundation Grant Adds To Therapeutic Garden at Presbyterian Village

Grant enables therapeutic garden expansion

Fort Scott Area Community Foundation gives $1,000

 Fort Scott Presbyterian Village’s efforts to build a therapeutic garden on the campus got a boost from the Fort Scott Area Community Foundation through the foundation’s grant program.

“The therapeutic garden at Presbyterian Village was started in 2017 with funds from Modern Woodman, Presbyterian Village funds and hundreds of volunteer hours,” said Ginger Nance, executive director at the Presbyterian Village. “This year with an additional $1,000 grant from the Fort Scott Community Foundation, we were able to add essential elements such as a concrete water fountain, some additional plants, bushes and constructed raised garden boxes which are being built to replace the ones that are deteriorated.”

The mission of the Fort Scott Area Community Foundation is to partner with and be a resource to organizations whose goal is to improve the quality of life in the Fort Scott, Kansas, area. FSACF strives to create connections between donors and a variety of many worthwhile causes.

“We can’t thank the foundation and other donors enough for their help with our project this year,” Nance said.

A therapeutic garden is an outdoor garden space that has been specifically designed to meet the physical, psychological, social and spiritual needs of the people using the garden as well as their caregivers, family members, visitors, and friends. Many studies suggest positive therapeutic benefits are gained when people are exposed to nature, even for just a few minutes each day. A natural outdoor garden setting promotes exercise and stimulates all the senses. Therapeutic gardens promote movement, positive reminiscences, decrease stress and stabilize sleep-wake cycles.

“The therapeutic garden is enjoyed by family members and tenants, by employees, volunteers and the community at large,” Nance said. “The garden has been utilized for the Mother’s Day banquet, patio music entertainment, outdoor dining, growing vegetables and most of all, for a peaceful relaxing retreat daily to everyone who has entered.”

Each year special features and plant life are added to the retreat space. Volunteers and tenants who love to garden have worked the soil and planted flowers and vegetables all spring and summer in order to improve the space and benefit from the sights and sounds of nature.

“We invite everyone out to enjoy the wonderful space,” states Nance. “The design is a work in progress as financial resources, weather and time allow.” “Next year, we hope to add more to the space and include improved patio dining possibilities by adding umbrellas, a possible pergola, and other shading options,” Nance said.

Thank you to all who have helped make this possible for our community! If you would like to get involved to contribute toward continued improvements to the therapeutic garden, please contact Nance at gnance@pmma.org or call 620-223-5550.

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Fort Scott Presbyterian Village has been offering independent and assisted living apartments for seniors from southeast Kansas and southwest Missouri since 1994. Learn more at FortScottPresbyterianVillage.org. It is a member of the nonprofit Presbyterian Manors of Mid-America network of 17 communities in Kansas and Missouri. Learn more about PMMA at PresbyterianManors.org.