Fort Scott City Commission Agenda and Minutes

The agenda for the Fort Scott City Commision meeting, June 5 at 6 p.m. at City Hall, 123 S. Main.

 

 

I. ROLL CALL:

ADAMSON BARTELSMEYER NICHOLS PARKER MITCHELL

II. FLAG SALUTE

III. INVOCATION: Pastor Norman Tillotson, First Baptist Church

IV. PROCLAMATIONS/RECOGNITIONS:

V. CONSENT AGENDA:

  1. Approval of minutes of the regular meeting of May 15th, 2018.

  1. Approval of Appropriation Ordinance 1216-A totaling $653,024.45.

  1. Resolution No. 28-2018 – Notice of Hearing With Reference to Alleged Unsafe and Dangerous Structure and Accessory Structure located at 608 S. Broadway – Public Hearing Date – 7/17/2018 at 6:15 p.m.

  1. Resolution No. 29-2018 – Notice of Hearing with Reference to Alleged Unsafe and Dangerous Structure located at 1914 E. Wall Street – Public Hearing Date – 7/17/2018 at 6:15 p.m.

  1. Certificate of Appropriateness – Sign at 23 S. Main

VII. APPEARANCE/COMMENTS/PUBLIC HEARING:

  1. APPEARANCE:

Dave Bruner – Red Cross Smoke Detector Update and Presentation of Check to Dicie Nicklaus, Disaster Program Manager for American Red Cross

Fort Scott High School – Amber Toth’s class

B. CITIZEN COMMENTS (Concerning Items Not on Agenda – 3 minute limit per citizen)

C. PUBLIC HEARINGS/COMMENTS:

6:15 p.m. Resolution 23-2018 directing the repair or removal of an unsafe and dangerous structure located at 504 S. Judson Street

Discussion of 523 E. Wall demolition

Discussion of 1523 E. Wall demolition

Discussion of 309 S. Lowman demolition

Discussion of 13 N. Holbrook demolition

Discussion of 310 N. Cleveland demolition

VIII. CONSIDERATION:

  1. Approval of Ordinance No. 3534 authorizing the City to issue Taxable Industrial Revenue Bonds, Series 2018 (Price Chopper Project) for the purpose of the acquisition, construction, renovation and equipping of a commercial facility; and authorizing certain other documents and actions in connection therewith – $6,250,000

IX. COMMENTS:

  1. Director Updates: Rhonda Dunn
  1. Commission:
  1. City Attorney:
  1. Director of Finance:
  1. City Manager:

EXECUTIVE SESSION:

I MOVE THAT THE CITY COMMISSION RECESS INTO EXECUTIVE

SESSION FOR ________________________________ IN ORDER TO

(see below justification)

DISCUSS ______________________________________. THE

EXECUTIVE SESSION WILL BE ___________ MINUTES AND THE OPEN

MEETING TO RESUME AT ________________.

Justifications for Executive Sessions:

  • Personnel matters of non-elected personnel

  • Consultation with an attorney for the body or agency which would be deemed privileged in the attorney-client relationship

  • Matters relating to employer-employee negotiations whether or not in consultation with the representative or representatives of the body or agency

  • Confidential data relating to financial affairs or trade secrets of corporations, partnerships, trusts and individual proprietorships

  • Preliminary discussions relating to the acquisition of real property

X. MOTION FOR ADJOURNMENT: ROLL CALL

CITY OF FORT SCOTT

CITY COMMISSION MEETING

Minutes of May 15, 2018 Regular Meeting #10

The regular meeting of the Fort Scott City Commission was held May 15th, 2018 at 6:00 p.m. in the City Commission Room, 123 S. Main, Fort Scott, Kansas.

ROLL CALL:

Commissioners Adamson, Bartelsmeyer, Nichols, and Parker were present with Mayor Mitchell presiding.

INVOCATION: Michael Mix, Public Utilities Director, said a prayer asking God for guidance for the city and all government and City officials.

AUDIENCE IN ATTENDANCE: Lindsay Madison, Jody Hoener, Carol Lydic, Marlene Braker, Tammy Helm, Vickie Chaplin, Kenny Howard, Chris Garrett, Dave Mohler, Angie Kemmerer, Dawna Hudiburg, Ella Beth, Michelle Hudiburg, Kenny Hudiburg, Whitney Beth, DeWayne April, Samantha Shadden, Clifton Beth, Cody McGehee, Terry Sercer, Bill Peterson, William Polk, Deb Needleman, Janet Braun, Tina Rockhold, Michael Mix, Denton Wescoat, Rachel Pruitt, Larry Gazaway, Shane Walker, Kyle Parks, Coby Jones, Robby Sharman, Frank Halsey, Todd Farrell, Travis Shelton, Frank Halsey, Paul Ballou, Clayton Miller, and Jason Silvers, representing the Fort Scott Tribune.

PROCLAMATIONS/RECOGNITIONS:

Recognition of New City Employees – Deb Needleman, Human Resource Director, introduced Dave Mohler and Cody McGehee as new Police Officers. Dave started on March 28th and Cody started on May 9th.

Buddy Poppy Day Proclamation – May 25, 2018Mayor Mitchell read a proclamation which proclaims May 25th, 2018 as Buddy Poppy Day in the City of Fort Scott and urged men and women to wear a buddy poppy as evidence of our gratitude to the men and women of this country who have risked their lives in defense of the freedoms which we continue to enjoy as American citizens.

Kiwanis Pioneer Club 30th Anniversary Proclamation – May 2018 – Mayor Mitchell read a proclamation which proclaims the month of May as Kiwanis Pioneer Club Month in the City of Fort Scott. The Kiwanis Pioneers strive to be a positive influence in our community so one day all children will wake up in a community that believes in them, nurtures them and provides the support they need to thrive. Carol Lydic, Marlene Braker, Tammy Helm, and Vickie Chaplin accepted the proclamation on behalf of the Pioneer Kiwanis group.

Presentation of Kress Building Idea – Dawna Hudiburg and Ella Beth, along with their teacher, Angie Kemmerer, presented to the City Commission their 3-D model of the Kress building which they used as a project to repurpose. These two freshman girls presented their idea of using the basement of the Kress building as a 7 lane bowling alley, and the main floor as an ice cream/soda fountain and retail area, and the top floor as a laser tag and mini golf area.

The Mayor and Commission thanked the two girls for their great ideas and for sharing them with the Commission.

Recognition of Healthy Bourbon County Action Team who helped with the installation of the bicycle racks for the non-motorized transportation plan:

Shane Walker with Bourbon County

Kyle Parks with Fort Scott High School FFA and AG Dept.

Coby Jones with Peerless

Robby Sharman with Peerless

Frank Halsey with Mid-Continental

Todd Farrell with the City of Fort Scott

Jody Hoener, Bourbon County Action Team, and Mayor Mitchell presented the above individuals with Certificates of Recognition for their help and assistance in the development, sand blasting, painting, and installation of the bicycle racks.

APPROVAL OF MINUTES AND APPROPRIATIONS/CONSENT AGENDA:

  1. Approval of minutes of the regular meeting of May 1st, 2018.

  1. Approval of Appropriation Ordinance 1215-A totaling $339,530.18.

  1. Good Ol’ Days Parade Request Form

  1. Cereal Malt Beverage Beer Garden Application – Bourbon County Shrine Club – June 1st & 2nd, 2018 – Skubitz Plaza location

  1. Certificate of Appropriateness – Alterations to the building at 16 N. National

Bartelsmeyer moved to approve the Consent Agenda. Adamson seconded. All voted aye.

APPROVED CONSENT AGENDA.

APPEARANCE/COMMENTS/PUBLIC HEARING:

  1. APPEARANCE:

Frank Halsey – Marmaton Massacre Festival & Update on new trails – Mr. Halsey appeared before the Commission to request Gunn Park trails and Shelters #6 and #7 be used again this year for the Marmaton Massacre Festival which will be held July 7th and 8th. He also asked to reserve the camping area for this weekend for the riders that will come in. They will have events both days. A band will play in the park that evening. He also gave an update on the new trails that have been created. There are now about 8 miles of trails with the new property that was purchased in 2017. A beginner’s loop has been constructed and a pump track will be constructed soon. They have named their trails to keep the history of this area alive. The Kansas State Mountain Bike Championship race will be held the weekend of July 7th and 8th also this year.

Mitchell moved to approve the Marmaton Massacre Festival to be held in Gunn Park on July 7th and 8th and to allow the use of Shelters #6 and #7 and the use of the camping area. Nichols seconded. All voted aye.

APPROVED MARMATON MASSACRE TO BE HELD IN GUNN PARK ON JULY 7TH AND 8TH, 2018 AND THE USE OF SHELTERS #6 AND #7 AND THE USE OF THE CAMPING AREAS.

Tina Rockhold – Street Closure – Wine Stroll – Tina informed the Commission that the Bourbon County Arts Council is planning an Art Walk that would also include a Wine Stroll. There will be five wineries from across the State set up on the sidewalks on Main Street. New this year will be breweries and distilleries set up as well. After checking their ID, tickets can be purchased and a wrist band given and a wine glass. The idea is to stroll down Main Street sampling the wines and you can purchase your favorite unopened bottle to take home. She asked for Main Street to be closed from 1st to 2nd Street starting at 3:00 p.m. She said that 250 people attended last year. The date is July 27th, 2018. The evening will conclude with a concert at Liberty Theatre featuring Blane Howard.

City Manager suggested giving approval for the event with City staff coordinating the street closure.

Bartelsmeyer moved to approve the Arts Council Wine Stroll and Art Walk with Main Street closed from 1st to 2nd starting at 3:00 p.m. on Friday, July 27th, 2018. Parker seconded. All voted aye.

approveD the Arts Council Wine Stroll AND ART WALK with Main Street BEING CLOSED FROM 1ST TO 2ND STARTING AT 3:00 P.M. ON FRIDAY, July 27th, 2018.

B. CITIZEN COMMENTS (Concerning Items Not on Agenda – 3 minute

limit per citizen) – None

  1. PUBLIC HEARINGS:

Bartelsmeyer moved to open the Public Hearing at 6:45 p.m. Parker seconded. Motion carried.

OPENED PUBLIC HEARING AT 6:45 P.M.

6:15 p.m. Resolution 26-2018 directing the repair or removal of an unsafe and dangerous structure located at 1306 E. Wall Street – City Manager informed the Commission that Rhonda Dunn is away at a conference and asked that this hearing is to be continued 30 days.

Mayor Mitchell asked if anyone was present to comment on this structure.

DeWayne April, the owner, was present and informed the Commission that he has removed the old roof and put a new roof on. He is working on the siding also, but ran out of funds.

Mitchell made a motion to continue this public hearing on this structure at 1306 E. Wall in 30 days. Bartelsmeyer seconded. All voted aye.

CONTINUED PUBLIC HEARING ON 1306 E. WALL FOR 30 DAYS.

Bartelsmeyer moved to close the Public Hearing at 6:47 p.m. Parker seconded. All voted aye.

CLOSED PUBLIC HEARING AT 6:47 P.M.

CONSIDERATION:

  1. Presentation of 2017 Audit – Terry SercerMr. Sercer appeared before the Commission to present the 2017 Audit. He reminded the Commission that this is an unqualified opinion, but the highest level of opinion received. This financial statement presents fairly the aggregate cash and unencumbered cash balance for the City of Fort Scott as of December 31, 2017. He said that the City did not have any violations with compliance with Kansas Statutes. He stated that the General Fund has a good solid balance. There were no violations of the cash basis law. There are no federal or grant violations.

City Manager thanked Jon Garrison, Director of Finance, for the good job he does with the City’s finances.

Parker moved to approve the 2017 Audit. Nichols seconded. All voted aye.

APPROVED 2017 AUDIT.

  1. Approval of Resolution 25-2018 approving the form of Supplemental Trust Indenture No. 2 to a certain Trust Indenture entered into by the City in connection with the issuance by the City of its Taxable Industrial Revenue Bonds, Series 2014 (Sleep Inn and Suites Hotel Project) – Bob Farmer, City Attorney, informed the Commission that this bond issue is being refinanced for a better interest rate. Approval of the Resolution is recommended.

Parker moved to approve the Resolution and documentation for the refinancing of bonds for Sleep Inn & Suites. Bartelsmeyer seconded. All voted aye.

APPROVED RESOLUTION NO. 25-2018 OF THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE CITY OF FORT SCOTT, KANSAS APPROVING THE FORM OF SUPPLEMENTAL TRUST INDENTURE NO. 2 TO A CERTAIN TRUST INDENTURE ENTERED INTO BY THE CITY IN CONNECTION WITH THE ISSUANCE BY THE CITY OF ITS TAXABLE INDUSTRIAL REVENUE BONDS, SERIES 2014 (SLEEP INN AND SUITES HOTEL PROJECT).

  1. Resolution 27-2018 adopting and providing for standards for procurement, bidding and contract awards – USDA Rural Development – River Intake Project – Jon Garrison, Director of Finance, informed the Commission that this Resolution needs to be approved as part of the U.S.D.A. River Intake Project documentation.

Mitchell moved to approve Resolution No. 27-2018 – U.S.D.A. Rural Development documentation. Nichols seconded. All voted aye.

APPROVED RESOLUTION NO. 27-2018 OF THE CITY OF FORT SCOTT, KANSAS ADOPTING AND PROVIDING FOR STANDARDS FOR PROCUREMENT, BIDDING AND CONTRACT AWARDS – RIVER INTAKE PROJECT.

  1. Consideration of Hay Bid – Fort Scott Municipal AirportKenny Howard, Airport Manager, informed the Commission that bids were taken for the Airport Hay. This is a one year hay contract. There were two bids received: Dale Bollinger in the amount of $4,576.00 and Hubert Thomas in the amount of $4,554.00. He asked the Commission to approve the high bid from Dale Bollinger.

Nichols moved to approve the high bid for airport hay from Dale Bollinger in the amount of $4,576.00. Adamson seconded. All voted aye.

APPROVED THE BID FROM DALE BOLLINGER IN THE AMOUNT OF $4,576.00 FOR THE HAY AT THE FORT SCOTT MUNICIPAL AIRPORT FOR 2018-2019.

  1. Approval of proposal for generator maintenance from Generator Services of Independence, Missouri – Michael Mix, Water Utility Director, informed the Commission that the City has nine large generators used for emergency power supply in the event of power outages. The City should be performing load bank testing annually to 75% and then every three years to 80% for four hours. Valve lash adjustment should also be performed every three years. The City’s generators were last tested in 2014. City personnel lacks the equipment required to perform this maintenance. He recommended Generator Services of Independence, Missouri. The annual cost is $18,029.00.

Nichols moved to approve the proposal from Generator Services of Independence, Missouri in the amount of $18,029.00 for maintenance of the City’s nine generators. Parker seconded. All voted aye.

APPROVED PROPOSAL FROM GENERATOR SERVICES OF INDEPENDENCE, MISSOURI IN THE AMOUNT OF $18,029 FOR MAINTENANCE OF THE CITY’S NINE GENERATORS.

  1. Consideration of minor alteration for Chamber building – 231 E. Wall – Lindsay Madison, Director, Fort Scott Area Chamber of Commerce, appeared before the Commission and requested that along with the renovation the CVB is doing, the Chamber would like to have a minor alteration made to create a small window opening to the lobby on what will become the Chamber Administrative Assistant office. The window will be approximately 48” wide and 36” high and will allow Chamber staff to serve the needs of the members and community coming into the building for Chamber needs. The CVB will be greeting and taking care of visitors from their new office.

Mitchell moved to approve the minor alteration for the Chamber building at 231 E. Wall. Adamson seconded. All voted aye.

APPROVED MINOR ALTERATION FOR THE CHAMBER BUILDING AT 231 E. WALL STREET.

COMMISSION/STAFF:

  1. Director Updates: Rachel Pruitt – Rachel updated the Commission on two items. The first item is the funding for the Airport. The first announcement for the KDOT Aviation Airport Improvement Projects was on April 27th and Fort Scott was not listed. The next announcement was on May 3rd and KDOT announced four additional airport improvement projects of which Fort Scott was listed. Fort Scott was awarded $286,522 to upgrade the Automated Weather Observation System and relocate runway lighting to accommodate runway construction. The City asked for $3.75 million. She said she is disappointed but will apply again. There are also federal grants that she can apply for in July. All the engineering that has been done at the Airport to date will be good for 24 months.

Fort Scott Lofts – Rachel announced that she was notified earlier today that Fort Scott Lofts was awarded the tax credits for the renovation of this building. The next step is to apply for the Neighborhood Revitalization Program which will rebate taxes for the next 15 years. They look to open early in the fall of 2019. Rachel said that she is looking to put up “Coming Soon” banners in the windows of the building. This building will have retail on the bottom level and market rate apartments on the top floors.

B. City Commission:

Adamson Nothing to report.

Bartelsmeyer Remarked that she is excited to hear all the good things going on in Fort Scott.

Nichols Said kudos to the two young girls who presented their project tonight. They have great ideas!

Parker – Said that she is excited to see the young people get involved and be creative in the future of our downtown.

Mitchell Nothing to report.

C. City Attorney: Nothing to report.

  1. Director of Finance: Nothing to report.

  1. City Manager:

  1. Murph Challenge – Smallville Crossfit – City Manager announced that Crossfit will be having a Murph Challenge on Monday, May 28th, 2018. He asked to have National Avenue closed from 1st to Wall from 5:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. on that morning.

Mitchell moved to close National Avenue from 1st to Wall Street from 5:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. on Monday, May 28th, 2018. Nichols seconded. All voted aye.

approved to close National Avenue from 1st to Wall Street from 5:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. on Monday, May 28th, 2018 for the murph challenge for crossfit.

  1. SEK Mental Health Building Dedication – City Manager reminded the Commission of the dedication of the SEK Mental Health building in the memory of late Judge Samuel Mason at 11:00 a.m. on Wednesday, May 16, 2018.

  1. Project List – City Manager shared the Project List with the Commission. He updated them that the pool is being filled and some work has been done in the bathrooms.

  1. 2nd Street Park – City Manager said that he has met with Shane Walker and Jerry Witt on 2nd Street Park. They will be memorializing some items there.

  1. Airport Annexation – City Manager said that the City Attorney is working on annexing the Airport into the City limits.

ADJOURNMENT:

Parker moved to adjourn the meeting at 7:15 p.m. Bartelsmeyer seconded. All voted aye.

ADJOURNED MEETING AT 7:15 P.M.

The next regularly scheduled meeting is to be held on June 5th, 2018 at 6:00 p.m.

RECORDED BY:

____________________

DIANE K. CLAY

CITY CLERK

Fort Scott Talent Extravaganza May 31 Results

The list of contestants of the Fort Scott Talent Extravaganza 2018 posted at Memorial Hall Thursday afternoon.
Morgan Eaton, 16 years old, Fort Scott, rehearses her performance Thursday afternoon for the Fort Scott Talent Extravaganza later in the evening.
Contestants were judged on talent, entertaining and appearance for the Fort Scott Talent Extravaganza Thursday evening at Memorial Hall. Pictured is the judges tally sheet.

 

The final results of the competition are:  First Place, Kenna Miles  who won $300; Second Place, Christina Ramirez, who won$200;
Third Place, Jakob Slinkard and Jorden Willard, who won $100.

 

Grand Opening/Ribbon Cutting of Boiler Room Brewhaus June 2

GRAND OPENING AND RIBBON-CUTTING OF THE BOILER ROOM BREWHAUS
Saturday, June 2, 2018
1:45pm

FORT SCOTT – The Fort Scott Area Chamber of Commerce announces a Ribbon Cutting Ceremony to celebrate the Grand Re-opening of The Boiler Room Brewhaus in their new location of 10 S. National Ave. The ceremony will take place this Saturday, June 2, 2018, at 1:45 pm, just prior to the official opening of the business at 2 pm.

Tickets to the Grand Re-opening event are not required but are free and may be obtained through The Boiler Room Brewhaus Facebook page. Those with tickets will have reserved seating. Attendees must be 21-years-old to sample or purchase alcoholic beverages; soda, tea, and water will also be available. Minors are allowed but must have adult supervision.

The Chamber invites members and the community to attend and congratulate the Ritter’s on the re-opening and expansion of the Brewhaus. The owner of the building known as the former “Downtowner Motel”, Josh Jones, is also to be commended for investing in upgrades to the property located in the Historic District.

For questions or more information email the Fort Scott Area Chamber of Commerce at information@fortscott.com.

Kids Summer Food Programs in Bourbon County Begin

Children of all ages came to the Keyhole Wednesday for the free sack lunch.

Communities in Bourbon County have taken advantage of the government’s opportunities to feed children and youth for free this summer.

Fort Scott

The Kansas Food Bank Federal Summer Meal Program provides free shelf-stable food for area youngsters up to 18 years old at the Keyhole Youth Center, 1002 S. Main, across from Fort Scott High School.

The program started May 29 and serves lunch from noon to 1 p.m. and will continue until July 29.

A look at what is inside the free sack lunch offering at the Keyhole Youth Center.
Fresh fruits are provided with the free sack lunch by The Beacon.
On Wednesday, May 30, Diana Spencer and Joyce Gobl helped serve the free sack lunches at the Keyhole.

Community groups volunteer their time to help serve the meals: Mondays the First Methodist Church serves, Tuesday-Fort Scott Church of the Nazarene, Wednesday-Pioneer Kiwanis, Thursday-City of Fort Scott, Friday-First Presbyterian Church and Community Christian Church.

On May 29, the first day of the food program there were 28 children who were served, according to Bethany Hartford, Keyhole director.

Hartford coordinates the meal program with Dona Bauer.

Uniontown

Uniontown’s Food Service Director Michelle DeMott is facilitating the Summer Food Service Program for USD 235. It is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The food is free to children birth to 18 years old, DeMott said.

“It is no cost, regardless of any financial standard,” she said.

Their program offers cooked breakfasts and lunches Monday through Friday and starts next Monday, June 4.

Breakfast is from 8:30 to 9 a.m. and includes such menu items as biscuits and gravy, breakfast pizza, waffles, cereals, donuts, cheese, and yogurt, plus milk and juice. Each day features a different menu.

Lunch is from 11:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. and includes the standard American diet offerings of hot dogs, spaghetti, tacos, hamburgers, and sandwiches.

The school has a summer school program, of which the food service is a part. But other children in the community may come for the food at breakfast and lunch, she said.

Additionally, the Uniontown High School weight-lift program and the volleyball practice students come to the meals, DeMott said.

The meals are provided at West Bourbon Elementary School, located at 602 Fifth Street.

Bronson and Redfield

Bronson and Redfield communities will also have meals available at the same time at the Bronson Community Center, 503 Clay, and the Marmaton Community Church, 102 Cedar in Redfield.

“We will have activities for the kids between breakfast and lunch at these sites,” DeMott said. “For those who would like to stay”

Community members volunteer to facilitate activities for the youth in these communities, she said.

“Some had parents not at home and who didn’t want to go home,” DeMott said.

 

 

 

DCF Announces New Child Welfare Grants and Contract

 

Grants and contracts, effective July 2019, improves Kansas foster care services

 

TOPEKA – Kansas Department for Children and Families (DCF) Secretary Gina Meier-Hummel is pleased to announce the new child welfare grants and contract Request for Proposals (RFPs). DCF posted the RFP’s today, May 31, and they include substantial changes from the current child welfare contracts. DCF developed the improved child welfare grants and contract to address known issues within the Kansas foster care system after receiving input from the public, legislators and stakeholders.

The new child welfare grants improve accountability, oversight, fiscal responsibility, quality services, conflicts of interest, are client-centered, focused on needs-based services, competition and innovation. In addition, foster homes, kin, children and families will be more empowered. The grants also emphasize permanency in child-time, preferably with family, if safely possible. With these grants, Secretary Meier-Hummel is also committed to safely reducing the number of children in out-of-home care.

“By listening to Kansans, and by taking a careful look at our systems, we created grants and contracts that we truly believe will have a positive impact on the children and families in this state,” Secretary Meier-Hummel said. “Overall, this is a dramatic change, creating more accountability and oversight. We will be controlling more of the process, monitoring and expecting results for the families we serve.”

Currently, DCF offers four family preservation and four foster care contracts, to two providers statewide. Moving forward, DCF will offer two grants—Family Preservation and Foster Care. Potential providers can bid for both grants, but will only be awarded one grant in each DCF Region. This will eliminate current perceived conflicts of interest. Additionally, a statewide Placement Matching System contract will be released soon. Below are some of the changes included in the RFP’s:

  • Family Preservation
    • A new program focused on keeping children with their families, when safely possible, and safely reducing the number of children coming into out-of-home care.
    • Previously a one-size-fits-all program will now be tailored to the needs of each family
    • The state determines when providers are in the home working with families, and the intensity of services
    • Rates will differ based on the intensity of services needed, and payments will not be made to providers until milestones with the family are met (previously payments were made regardless of progress made)
  • Foster Care
    • Services will be provided to the entire family, not just the child(ren)
    • Grantees will be required to use the Placement Management System.
    • New grant structure will contain costs, allowing negotiation of changes only if there is a substantial change in caseloads.
    • Caseload sizes will not be allowed to exceed 25-30, per case manager, for foster care/reintegration/adoption cases, and 50, per case manager, for aftercare cases.
  • Placement Matching System
    • Currently, each provider has its own system, and the State does not readily have available data. This new contract will require every licensed foster home or residential bed, to be entered into a single statewide system
    • DCF will monitor the system to ensure children’s placement needs are being met, and they are remaining in their home communities, when possible.
    • The system will capture electronic records for the youth that are in the foster care system

 

The grants also include a long list of other substantial changes:

  • Smaller foster care catchment areas, bringing more community providers to the table to serve Kansas children (previously four catchment areas, now eight)
  • The new grant establishes an advisory board—consisting of youth in care, biological families, foster parents and providers—to provide feedback directly to Secretary Meier-Hummel
  • DCF contracting directly with CPA’s
  • DCF establishes rate settings for placements—this includes increased rate setting for relative and kin placements.

 

“These new grants and contracts are essential to enacting major reform in Kansas child welfare. We are building an infrastructure that puts the children and families of Kansas first, while still bringing private providers, innovation and competition to the table,” said Governor Jeff Colyer. “These are our kids, they are Kansans, and they deserve the best care possible. Moving forward, they will receive quality, timely services.”

All of these improvements follow internal reviews of the agency, as well as a formal Request for Information (RFI) process, in which DCF gathered feedback from the public and stakeholders. Through the RFI process, we received 393 submissions, that will be available for review on the DCF Public website by 8 a.m., Friday, June 1.

“It was clear, based on the feedback and the work of the legislative Child Welfare System Task Force, a change in the structure and work in the child welfare contracts was needed,” Secretary Meier-Hummel said. “Quite simply, the public, stakeholders and legislators spoke, and we listened.”

“It has been my pleasure to be a part of the Child Welfare System Task Force. We have had purposeful, albeit difficult conversations, that are essential to cause statewide, systematic changes and break down barriers for Kansas children and youth,” said Senator Barbara Bollier. “It is obvious that Secretary Meier-Hummel and her team have been listening to these conversations, and are taking action to address much-needed issues within the system.”

RFP submissions are due by Monday, Aug. 9. Presentations will begin in October, and the child welfare grants and Placement Management System contract will be awarded no later than December 2018. The new providers will begin serving Kansas children and families on July 1, 2019. You can find the Foster Care and Family Preservation RFP’s here.

 

Fort Scott City Commission Work Session June 5 at 5 p.m.

There will be a work session of the Fort Scott City Commission held on Tuesday, June 5th, 2018 at 5:00 p.m. in the City Commission meeting room at 123 S. Main Street. This work session will be held to discuss the updated Comprehensive Plan. No action will be taken at this work session. This meeting is open to the public.

Make The Most of Opportunities By Patty LaRoche

Conduct yourselves with wisdom toward outsiders, making the most of the opportunity. (Col. 4:5)

We met in the exercise room. “I’ll only be in here two minutes,” she said as a way of introduction. Two became twenty, during which time I learned the following:

  • She is divorced from an abusive man who pays her only $600 a month in alimony. Her attorneys took most of her life savings.
  • She has fibromyalgia and has battled Lyme’s disease for 20 years.
  • She has been in three car accidents.
  • Her siblings all say she is a hypochondriac.
  • Some of the doctors she has seen have been really mean, especially her urologist.
  • The house she put a bid on won’t be ready for three weeks, all of her possessions are in five storage bins, and that’s what led her to stay in the same 2-Star motel as I am. (Read last week’s article.) She is not happy here for several reasons.
  • Feral cats live by the dumpster and someone feeds them.
  • Geese, which are a protected species but should not be, leave their feces everywhere around the motel.
  • Her room is filthy and filled with cockroaches. (I have seen only one.)
  • The people above her have children who bounce off the bed.
  • Last night she was awakened by a woman screaming. It was “really hard” to go back to sleep.
  • Her previous apartment had mold.
  • Her Labrador/best friend returned neurotic from a week at dog obedience school, refusing to mind and jumping on people. Not what she expected for $1500.00, and since there is so much geese/feral cat feces and people-litter around this motel, she has difficulty finding a place to get him some exercise.
  • She has gained twelve pounds, has a muffin-top, and her hair is falling out.

Twice I interjected some thoughts, like how I probably would have alerted the desk about the screaming and surely there are some dog parks nearby. She ignored the first suggestion and spent five minutes explaining how, in her condition, it is difficult to navigate the dog park.

From that point on, I vowed to keep my thoughts to myself.

Then, looking at her watch, she said she had to scoot because she had a fibro-myalgia massage scheduled but maybe I could go out with her this weekend to a fun bar or movie.

Rats!” I answered insincerely. “In two days my husband and I will be relocating to the other side of Jacksonville.” She seemed disappointed and said she hoped we could get together sometime.

Lord, please, NOOOOOOOOOOOO! I said to myself.

As a Christian, I know God wastes no opportunities. Pastor Andy Stanley once wrote, “We don’t need to pray for more miracles, we just need to be more sensitive to the opportunities that God brings our way.” Do I believe God had a reason for Ms. Chatterbox and me meeting? Yes. Maybe to tell her Jesus is the answer or maybe just to be a listening ear or maybe to hear someone complain non-stop so I know what I sometimes sound like to God. No doubt to pray for her.

In actuality, I did all of the above…well, except for telling her Jesus is the answer. For that one, as I had vowed, I kept my thoughts to myself.

And with that opportunity, I failed her the greatest.

Obituary For Linda Hurd Riley

Linda June Hurd Riley

Linda June Hurd Riley, age 75, a resident of rural Ft. Scott, Kansas, passed away early Wednesday, May 30, 2018, at the Mercy Hospital in Ft. Scott.

She was born September 5, 1942, in Fort Scott, the daughter of Grant Wesley Wiggans and Osa Lavetta Morrow Wiggans.

Linda first married Willis L. Hurd on September 27, 1958, at Fort Scott. He preceded her in death on December 14, 2011.

Following his death, Linda married Richard Riley on April 6, 2013. Linda and Richard enjoyed six years of marriage.

In earlier years, Linda had worked in the cafeteria of both the Junior and Senior High Schools. She later retired from Smico-Norvell after many years of employment. Linda and Richard attended both the Fort Scott Church of the Nazarene and Diamond Community Church.

Linda enjoyed the fun times spent with her family and friends. She enjoyed nature and liked to spend time outdoors.

Survivors include her husband, Richard, of the home; three grandchildren, Ryan Robison, Charles Robison and Jayden Robison, all of Ft. Scott and a great-granddaughter, Elena Robison. Also surviving are her step-children, Christine Bosley and husband, Gary, of Ft. Scott, Belinda Yockey, of Joplin, Missouri, Nathan Riley of Newark, Ohio and Carol Johnson and husband, Mike, of Lawrence, Kansas; several step-grandchildren and step-great-grandchildren, a sister, Nancy Kelly, of Springfield, Missouri and numerous nieces and nephews.

In addition to her first husband, Willis, she was preceded in death by a daughter, Barbara Gibbs, a son, Charles “Chuck” Hurd, a great-grandson, Benjamin Robison; four brothers, Earl, Virgil, Don and Robert Wiggans and two sisters, Helen Lunday and Lois Wiggans.

Linda’s niece, Lavetta Simmons, will conduct graveside services at 11:00 A.M. Monday, June 4th at the Clarksburg Cemetery.

The family will receive friends on Monday from 10:00 A.M. until leaving for the cemetery at the Cheney Witt Chapel. Memorials are suggested to Care to Share and may be left in the care of the Cheney Witt Chapel, 201 S. Main, P.O. Box 347, Ft. Scott, KS 66701. Words of remembrance may be submitted to the online guestbook at cheneywitt.com.