New Organization Emphasizes Buying Locally

The audience listens to leaders of the group, Live Local BB, on Thursday.

Live Local BB is a grass-roots organization that had a public  introductory meeting Thursday at Sharkey’s Pub and Grub.

BB stands for Bourbon County and Live Local BB encourages growth of local businesses in the county.

“We want to educate the community on how it benefits the community to live locally,” Geoff Southwell told the group of interested  people. “Use local whenever possible. Money stays in the community. It’s creating and maintaining wealth and jobs”

Board member Geoff Southwell addresses a group of interested people Thursday at the initial public meeting of Live Local BB. Board member Melissa Wise listens in the background.

The group’s board members are Cindy Bartelsmeyer, Richard Goldston, Bryan Holt, Dave Lipe, Chris Maycumber, Andy Norris, Angie Simons, Southwell,  Rebecca Sutterby and Melissa Wise.

Live Local BB Board Members Rebecca Sutterby, left, and Melissa Wise, facing away, sign in interested attendees at the initial public meeting of the organization.

 

Live Local BB board members from left: Andy Norris, Dave Lipe, Bryan Holt, Chris Maycumber and Richard Goldston listen as Geoff Southwell addresses the attendees at the initial meeting.

Fort Scott City and Chamber of Commerce officials “have jumped on board with us,” Southwell said.

The City of Fort Scott presented a $500 check to the group  Thursday evening at the initial meeting.

To get the word out, the 65  businesses who have joined so far are encouraged to tell about their business on the local radio station.

“There will be  2 to 3 radio spots a day for the first twelve months,” Southwell said. “Talk in microphone, they will edit that. KMDO brings it together and it’s good. Volunteers are needed to get the word out.”

The group also has a Facebook page, Live Local  BB.

Live Local BB is a grass-roots organization just formed in Fort Scott to encourage residents to buy from local businesses.

U. S.69 Highway Projects Update

Construction is winding down on the highway improvement project through Fort Scott.

A construction crew of up to 10 men a day has been working on a section of U.S. Hwy. 69 that snakes through Fort Scott since April 2016.

“Hopefully, (the project) will be completed in the next two weeks,”  Bob Vipt, superintendent for Laforge and Budd Construction, Parsons, said Tuesday.

The highway improvement project extends from the driveway of Extrusions Inc. north to Briggs Fort Scott on South Main Street, he said.

The crew has added a turning lane at the intersection of National and U.S. Hwy. 69 and also at 23rd Street and U.S.Hwy.69

The intersection of U.S. Hwy. 69 and South National Avenue, Fort Scott, where new traffic lights were installed and a turning lane added  as part of a highway improvement project.

“I think these were congested intersections at times,” Vipt said.

Newly installed traffic lights and a turning lane at the intersection of U.S. Hwy. 69 and 23rd Street in Fort Scott.

Also included in the construction project paid for with federal, state and city funds are:

  • two new stop lights
  • new storm drains on the east and replaced storm drains on the west side
  • new curb and guttering
  • New curb, guttering and storm drains recently installed on U.S. Hwy. 69, also known as South Main Street in Fort Scott.
  • new sidewalks
  • A new sidewalk lines the west side of U.S. Hwy. 69/South Main Street in Fort Scott.
  • new asphalt surface
  • new striping down the middle
  • new landscape sod

To be completed are the new  surface with roadway striping and also placing sod along both sides of U.S.Hwy. 69 adjacent to the project.

Laforge and Budd Construction is the general contractor, RFB Construction, Pittsburg, is a subcontractor on the project.

Highway expansion south of Fort Scott

Construction crews are also busy expanding a six-mile section of U.S. Hwy. 69 south of Fort Scott and north of Arma.

The section is being upgraded to an expressway, which is a four-lane highway but with access points.

This project was started in March 2017 and is scheduled for completion in November 2018, according to Priscilla Peterson, a Kansas Department of Transportation Public Affairs Manager.

RFB Construction workers were on site Tuesday in Fort Scott, working on the turn lanes..

 

Patty LaRoche: God Does Not Show Favoritism

The teary-eyed, African-American woman turned from the fast-food counter in San Bernardino, Calif., her takeout bag in hand and young son standing by her side. “I have never, ever felt so disrespected in my entire life,” she said to me. I looked around.

Good grief! I thought. What have I done this time?

“I’m sorry,” I responded, not a little embarrassed. “Is there a problem?”

She explained—loudly—that she had handed the cashier a $20 bill at which point the young gal held the money above her head, examining it carefully before announcing it “clean.”

“I watched the other three cashiers take $20 bills, and none of them checked the bills. It was an absolute disrespect to my color. This is 2016. I’m married to a white man, an attorney, and I’m going to call him right now and file a complaint. My son has read about this type of prejudice, but he’s never seen it. I feel so disrespected.”

“Do you think there’s any chance this is just a coincidence?” I asked.

“No,” she said, looking at me like I had just crawled out of a dumpster. “It’s obvious she thinks that because I’m black I’m using counterfeit money. I’m going outside to call my husband.” I turned to Dave, my husband, who was pretending not to hear our conversation. “She’s really ticked,” I told him.

“I didn’t notice,” he said, staring at the menu board.

Typical.

Dave and I were driving to California last year when we (correction: when I) observed this woman’s wrath. I suggested we wait in our car for her husband to arrive, just in case I was needed as a witness to a crime. Dave started the engine and skedaddled out of the parking lot.

I don’t know if the customer had a legitimate complaint, but let’s assume she did. Let’s assume the gal behind the counter was prejudice against blacks. Let’s assume none of us would have behaved like that. After all, as Christians, we love everyone…right? We can’t possibly have a prejudiced bone in our judgmental little bodies, now can we?

The Bible spends several chapters addressing personal prejudices, especially the ones between the Gentiles and the Jews. Even Peter was guilty—until the Lord forced him to face his bigotry when He orchestrated events to bring together Peter and Cornelius, who, from childhood, had been taught to disrespect (despise) each other. To Peter, Cornelius was a leader in the hated Roman/Gentile military whose job it was to oppress the Jews, and to Cornelius, Peter was from the opposite side of the camel tracks, a low-life Jew.

Until God got involved.

He did the unpredictable. God put in motion two events: He sent an angel to Cornelius who instructed him to send his soldiers for Peter; and He gave Peter three visions making it clear the Jews now could eat “unclean” Gentile food (a big No-No in Mosaic Law). Things were imploding on both fronts.

The end of this story is probably more optimistic than the San Bernardino one. At Cornelius’ home, Peter preached the “Good News” to Cornelius, his family and friends, and they committed their lives to Jesus and were baptized. Peter’s words (written in Acts 1:34-35) summarize the event. “I now realize how true it is that God does not show favoritism but accepts from every nation the one who fears him and does what is right.”

The result? We Gentiles (non-Jews) are fellow partakers of the promise in Jesus Christ, all because two men were willing to do things God’s way and not their own. I would guess the San Bernardino outcome might have been drastically different had both women chosen to do the same.

Riverfront Park Pavillion Coming Spring 2018

Members of Fort Scott Bourbon County Riverfront Authority discuss updates on construction projects at Riverfront Park Tuesday evening at the Carriage House. Clockwise from left: Danny Magee, Bob Love, Allen Warren, Jerry Witt and Jeff Sweetser.

As part of the ongoing Riverfront Park project on North National Avenue in Fort Scott, a 30-foot by 50-foot pavilion will be available for public use next spring.

Schenkel Contracting, Fort Scott, will construct the building which will arrive in late October from Lester Building Systems of Minnesota.

“It will be a wooden frame, with commercial scissor trusses, with a steel roof and gable ends,” Schenkel said. “It’s an open concept. It will have electricity and lights.”

The pavilion will be located east of the parking area just inside Riverfront Park in the Belltown Trail area, north of the Marmaton River.

The Riverfront Park parking lot. The new pavilion will be east of this site.

Members of the Fort Scott Bourbon County  Riverfront Authority met Tuesday evening at their regular monthly meeting to discuss this and other items upcoming in the park.

The board envisions this pavilion use for family gatherings or public concerts/meetings, according to Jerry Witt, chairman of the authority board.

The new pavilion will sit amidst the trees east of the parking lot.

The authority board has overseen the $2.2 million project, paid for with no taxpayer money, according to Jeff Sweetser, secretary/treasurer of the group, since 2007.

Reimbursements from Kansas Wildlife, Parks and Tourism were received in the amount of $20,114.02 for expenses on the pavilion and the overlook walkway. The City of Fort Scott provided in-kind labor for the park, which is an 80/20 cost split grant from KWPT.

The overlook will be a  wooden, pentagon-shaped walkway which will be at the intersection of the Marmaton River and Mill Creek in the park. Westar Energy is supplying recycled electric power poles for the overlook construction.

The authority board approved the overlook design from Brian Leaders Design, and discussed adding seating to the overlook walkway.

In other business, the authority board:

  • Discussed where information kiosks will be located.
  • Was updated on the Mercy Hospice Memorial area, to be located in a wooded section of the park near the river.  It will be circular with benches.
  • Learned that the Long Shoals Bridge bid-letting will start in December. The historic Parker Truss Bridge located in northeast Bourbon County will be relocated and restored over the Marmaton River in Riverfront Park.

 

Southeast Kansas Grazing Management School Set for October 14

Submitted by Christopher Petty, Southwind Extension Agent

A grazing school, focusing on ways Southeast Kansas farmers and ranchers utilize their resources to be productive, will be held on Saturday, October 14, at the Cherokee County Extension 4-H Building in Columbus, Kan. The meeting will begin at 9:30 with registration at 9 a.m. The program will feature experts from the Missouri, Oklahoma and Kansas Extension Systems as well as pasture tours and a demonstration of a fall fescue stockpile plot.

Topics will include:

 “Utilizing Your Resources to Meet Your Goals”

 “Grazing’s Effect on Plant Growth and Development”

 “Animal Nutrient Needs”

 “Matching Forage Resources to Your Herd”

 “Economics of Different Grazing Systems”

 Tours of two different pasture systems

 Fall Fescue Fertilization Demonstration

This program is jointly sponsored by K-State Research and Extension, Southwind Extension District, Cherokee County Extension, and Wildcat District. Cost for the meeting is only $10 per person, which is payable at the door. To facilitate planning and meal count, please call the Cherokee County Extension office at (620) 429-3849 by October 6. The meeting begins at 114 W. Country Road in Columbus, Kan.

Kansas State University is committed to making its services, activities and programs accessible to all participants. If you have special requirements due to a physical, vision or hearing disability, contact Dale Helwig, Cherokee County Extension (620) 429 3849 or email dhelwig@ksu.edu.

New Face At Mercy: Amanda Stice

Mercy Clinic staff in Fort Scott welcomed Amanda Stice on August 5, 2017 as a new nurse practitioner.

As a registered nurse, Stice decided to take on a bigger role in patient care and went on to become a family nurse practitioner.

Specializing in family medicine, she is board certified by the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners and earned  her master’s degree from the University of Missouri-Kansas City, according to a press release from Mercy.

She offers routine health care, management of chronic diseases, wellness exams, well woman exams, sports and school physicals, vaccinations and immunizations, treatment of minor illness and injuries and more.

Experiences in her practice have created many rewarding moments, Stice said.

“These experiences are what keep  me passionate about my career and role in my patient’s health,” she said.

Previously, she worked for nearly six years at University of Kansas Hospital as a registered nurse in acute care units.

After earning her master’s degree, she worked in urgent care in Independence, transitioning into primary care at the same location.

She and her husband live in Fort Scott with their two children.

Stice will see patients at Mercy Clinic Suite A, located in the hospital.

To make an appointment, call (620) 223-8040.

 

 

Obituary: Charles Leonard Workman

Cheney Witt Funeral Home

Charles Leonard Workman, age 90, a resident of Fort Scott, Kan., was welcomed into the arms of God on Friday, September 15, 2017.

He was born July 26, 1927, in Cato, Kan., the son of Ivan Lee Workman and Elva Naomi Palmer Workman. Charles graduated from the Fort Scott High School. He married Rose Ann Williams on April 6, 1947, at Cato. He served with the United States Army from 1950 to 1952. He was stationed in Germany and served as a radio operator as well as an instructor for the Howitzer 155 artillery gun. Following his service with the Army, Charles worked for General Motors in Kansas City for several years. He later moved to Fort Scott and worked for the United States Postal Service for thirty years. While with the postal service he served as Union President for many years. In addition, he owned and operated his own business American Breeding Service which he operated through the spring of 2017. He was a member of the Community Christian Church, and a life member of the Olson Frary Burkhart Post #1165 V.F.W. In earlier years, he enjoyed playing and coaching baseball.

Survivors include his wife, Rose Anna, of the home; three daughters, Rosetta Bailes and husband, Jon, of Fort Scott, Loma Marvin and Sid Smith, also of Fort Scott, and Lora Strong and Kevin Marvin, of Pittsburg, Kan.; five grandchildren, Melanie Lamb, Christopher Bailes, Charity Jackson, Cory Strong and Charley Bailes, and seven great-grandchildren. Also surviving is a sister, Agnes Armstrong of Fort Scott and several nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents, a sister, Loleta Tracy; two brothers, David Workman, who died in infancy and Bill Workman and twin great-grandsons.

Funeral services will be held at 10 a.m. Friday, September 22, at the Community Christian Church. Burial will follow in the U. S. National Cemetery with full military honors. The family will receive friends from 5 to 7 p.m. Thursday at the Cheney Witt Chapel. Memorials are suggested to the Community Christian Church and may be left in care of the Cheney Witt Chapel, 201 S. Main, P.O. Box 347, Fort Scott, KS 66701. Words of remembrance may be submitted to the online guestbook at cheneywitt.com.